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'th*- Book of past Timea shall he imsealeti. 



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A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY, 



OR 



WHICH CONTAINS EVERY REQUISITE ILLUSTRATION 



OF THE 



; 



OR THE ART OF FORETELLING FUTURE EVENTS, 
By the influences of the Heavenly Bodies. 

COMPRISING 



1. An historical narration of the aoti- 

qiiity and ▼erity of Astrology. 
1 Elbmentabt Principles or the Sci- 
* ENCE ; comprisiog a complete system 
of the Universe according to modern 
Astronomers. 
8. The Natures of the Twelre Signs, the 
Hoases of Heaven, the Planetary 
Orbs, the Fixed SUrs, &c. &c. 
•^ 4. The art of casting a Figure oir Theme 

of Heaven, or Scheme of Nativity, for 
any time whatever, by Perpetual 
Tables. 

5. Requisite descriptions of the Zodiacal 
and Mundane Aspects. 

6. The Doctrine of Nativities ; with 
select experimental Rules, for fore> 
seeing each particular event, from the 
cradle of iotancy to the tomb of age. 

7. The method of working Celestial 2>t- 
rectionst both in the zodiac and in 
mundo. 
8. The art of foreknowing the chief 

T%e wHole iOustraied and esr< 



events of life by Celbstul Pebiods ; 
a new and ivt]Mrtant di$cnvery. Also 
the theory of Progressive Directions. 

9. A number of remarkable Horoscopes, 
evincing the power of the Stars in Life 
and Death, 

10. The art of resolving; everv important 
question in the affairs of human life, 
b]r the science of Horary Astrology; 
with the Horoscope of London Bridge, 
&c. &c. 

11. The theory of State Astrology ; 
or the method used by Astrologers in 
foretelling the fates of Kingdoms, 
Thrones, and Empires, exemplified by 
a^ prophetic glance at the late Lunar 
Eclipse. 

18. An highly curious extract from an 
Original Mamucript ; communicated 
by a valuable correspondent, relative 
to the mystic signatures of the Seven 
Planets. 



^empl^ied by various inyportant and appropriaU , 
Dtagrams, and 

THREE ELEGANT ENGRAVINGS. 

AUTHOR OF " THE ASTROLOGER OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY/' 
" THE PROPHETIC MESSENGER/' &C. &C. 



•t I 



The book of past times shall be unsealed—a star shall arise in the north, whose 
beams shall enlighten the world." Ancient Prophecy, 



LONDON: 

PUBLISHED BY C. 8. ARNOLD^ TAVISTOCK STREET, COVENT GARDEN; 

OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH ; AND 

WESTLEY AND TYRRELL, DUBLIN. 



MDCCCXXVin. 



*7 



s, 



t > 



') . 



. ................. — . — . — nr i rn'r i f 

J. tPSMfn »nd8»n, Orttt irimimiittatnH, 



TO 



SIR WALTER SCOTT. 



THIS 
WHICH CONTAINS THE SELECT PRINCIPLES OP 

STARRY SCIENCE, 

TO WHICH HIMSELF, AS THE CELEBRATED 

AUTHOR OF WAVERLEY, &c. 
Hcis so often referred in his matchless writings ; 

And wbicb the author of this book feels a peculiar pleasure in presenting 
thus publicly to his notice ; in consequence of its being 
iree from the errors^ superstitions, and absur- 
dities of the dark ages ; 

M rejEl^ectfunp I9e]itcateti, 

With the most exalted opinion of his unrivalled talents ; and with the 
heartfelt voiih, that beneficent stars may henceforth shower down upon 
him their ''selectest influence;" in order that mankind, in general^ 
may long continue to enjoy that feast of intellectual pleasure^ which the 
author of this work, in common with thousands, has ever derived from 
the perusal of his inimitable labors in the field of literature. 

Jjondxm, January 1st, 1898. 



tf^ All Letters or Communications to 

B.APBASZ., 

The Author of this Work,; 
Are requested to be addressed, under oover, to the Publisher, 

MR. C. S. ARNOLD, 
21, Tavistock Street, Covbnt Garden. 



PREFATORY REMARKS 



TO TBB CAUBZB IbBABBR. 



** My Ifockteller UlU me the demand for those my papers increatet daily." 

AODISON. 



Jn again reverting to the interesting subject of planetary influence^ I 
cannot but express mv warmest and most grateful acknowledgments, for 
the kind support (ana I might, without vanitj, subjoin applause,) which 
my writings nave uniformly received, from the liberal and enlightened 
ot almost every class of readers. 

Scarcely has the Sun rolled thrice through the vaulted heaven, nnce 
the author first boldly adventured his writings upon the ocean of public 
opinion; but securing them^ in the bark of truth, they have had the 
proud satisfaction of stemming the torrent and weathering the gale, 
with calm and placid serenity : while hundreds of their more dazzling 
and adventurous contemporaries, who set sail with them, crowded with 
the full canvass of favourable criticism, and swelled with the fair wind 
of ephemeral applause, have been engulphed in the lethe of public con- 
tempt ; or after striking against the rocks of candid and impartial (but 
to them fatal) enquiry, have at last, wearied with the perils of their dis- 
astrous voyage, perchance, arrived at the desired haven of particular 
patronage — ^merely to be consigned to *' the tomb of all the Gapulets," 
where " Uieir names are no more remembered," and their merits are 
blotted for ever from the world of standard literature.—- Neither has the 
success of the author's writings been confined to England, nor to the 
British dominions; but '^the Astrologer" has reached the burning 
plains of fertile India ; and has even set at defiance the mighty waters 
of the vast Atlantic, reaching even the shores of the new worid ; — ^where 
the phalanx of prejudice, so usually arrayed against every thing meri-* 
torious out of '' the track of custom," has failed to stop its extraordinanr 
career.— For these victorious exertions in " the science of tiie stars, 
the author himseff daxms nothing praiseworthy.— Truth oniy, invincible 
truth, has been the magic talisman, at whose display these grand advan- 
tages have been gained I 

In the present volume, I have studiously avoided recording any thing 
which might be deemed superfluous, and at the same time, have been 
equally careful to refrain from omitting any thing of real utility in a sci- 
entific way. This the reader will at once perceive, in the Ferpetual 
Tables of the Sun's right ascension ; by which a " Theme of Heaven,*^ 



VI PREFATORY REMARKS. 

or horoscope^ may be cast, fcr any time, either past^ present^ or future, 
with singular faciUty^ and without anj reference to the celestial globe, 
the planisphere, or even the Enhemens. The table of the '* Planetary 
Dignities,; will at once evince tne superiority of my system, over Jthe sys- 
tems of former sidereal authors ; in which the brevity and consequent 
facility in becoming acquunted therewith, is only to be eauaUed by its 
experimental certamty. The nature and properties of " the Planetary 
Orbs," the ''Celestitd Signs," and of ''the Houses of Heaven," are the 
result of a most sedulous enquiiy for a series of years, into' this part of 
nature's secrets; added to which, they are enriched with many valuable 
discoveries from original and costly manuscripts ; but at the same time 
they are entirely divested of the superstitions and absurdities of the dark 
ages, — Those aosurdities which have hitherto been the reproach of As- 
trolo^, but for which the ancients may be wdl excused, without im- 
peaching their candour ; since the vacuum In the system, which the dis- 
covery of Herschel supplies, might well be supposed to lead to the 
adoption of many erroneous rules, by those persons who found the sci~ 
ence itself to stand the united test of reason and demonstration. 

Enough of Astronomy is given to render the Newtonian system of the 
universe intelligible to general readers, which, being described in as popu- 
lar a manner as the subject would permit, it is presumed will be an extra 
attraction to the work, and may cause it. to become a source of scientifie 
information, even to the most casual enquirer ; clearness and precision 
herein having been most particularly the author's chief aim, in whidi 
he trusts he has succeeded sufficiently to merit notice. 

In the latter part of the work, where the author has treated of ''the 
Doctrine of Nativities," &c. his rules for ascertaining the particulars of in- 
dividual fate, are, he presumes, superior to what any other author has 
given ; being founded on a true philosophical attention to cause and 
effect, the result of actual observation, and therefore far more valuable 
than if they were the mere assertions of a former writer. Tlie author 
likewise requests particular attention to his important discovery relative 
to the method of foreknowing those particular times of life, which are 
likely to prove more fortupate, or more remarkable than others, by the 
theory of " Celestial Periods ;" a discovery which, after years of unre- 
mitting and patient labor, he feels proud in submitting to the notice even 
of the most erudite student in the art ; as thereby may be perceived 
many hidden beauties in this sublime science, whidi would otherwise 
havQ escaped observation, while the peculiar simplicity, yet elegance, of 
the theory, aqd the demonstration it affords, will amply repay the stu- 
dent for the trifling pains he may take in acquiring it. 
. Next to the foregoing, may be mentioned, the easy rules which the 
author has laid down for finding and equating the various Celestial Arcs 
of Direction, iu nativities^ whether primary or progressive— the method 
of solving Horary Questions; and the brevity but perspicuity of the 
theory he has given, for foreseeing the destinies and revolutions of king- 
doms, thrones, and empires, which constitute nfhat is termed State Astro^ 
logy. Being'deduced from the actual position of the heavenly bodies at 
the instant of any. eclipse, comet, solar ingress, or other celestial pheno- 
mena. These, with various other subjects of importance, will be found 
to render the principal part of the book most peculiarly interesting, 
and replete with select instruction in the different branches of the As- 
tral science. 

Pythagoras maintained that the world is actuated by a divine soul ; 



L - 



Mi^ 



PRErATORT REMARKS. \n 

and when we come to examine that miraculous gympathy in nature, %9 
adinirably manifested between the heavenly bodies ana the amazingp 
body of water surrounding our earth, which is incessantly agitated by 
sympathetic influence, we are involuntarily brought to think of the doc* . 
trine of this ancient sage. No fact in philosophy is more indisputable, 
than that which assures us of the influence of the Sun, Moon, Planets, 
and Stars, on the Earth and its inhabitants. The continual and pe- 
riodical change in the weather — the constant and the variable winds to 
which particular climates are subject— the phenomena peculiar to the 
several seasons, and many other effects that might, were it necessary, be 
pointed out ; are proofs which render the existence of such planetary 
influence unquestionable. There is, however^ one means more visible,* 
than either of those before mentioned, by which the reality of Astro- 
logical influence may be exemplified, and pretty well estimated ; and 
that is^ the alternate ebbing and flowing of the sea^ or the theory of the 
tides; which^ even the greatest incredulist in celestial philosophy, is 
compelled unequivocally to allow^ is produced entirely by the Soiar and 
hmar agency. The phenomena exhibited in this department of nature, 
is flo analogous to those operations on which Astrological doctrines rest, 
that it cannot be too doseiy examined into; and the more scrupulously 
it is brought into comparison with atmospheric fluctuations, tne more 
these will be understood^ and (it is presumed) the science of Astrology 
venerated. — Those persons who have taken the trouble to examine witn 
attention the immediate Influence of the luminaries upon the waters of 
the ocean, will^ no doubt, come to this inference ; namely, if those bo- 
dies do thus compel so gross a mass of matter as the ocean, to periodi- 
cally toss and roll in a manner contrary to its own nature, which is inert 
repose ; so must their respective influences operate to disturb and alter, 
the state of every sort of matter whatsoever, sensible and insensible, 
l^t is connected with the eaxth, — For it is a conspicuous axiom in the 
Newtonian theory, ^' That every particle of matter in the universe i^ 
endued with a sympathetic enei^ or influence, by which it is capable 
of communicating imperceptibly with every other particle throughout 
the system of nature.' 

The whole surface of the human body, when moderately corpulent, is 
about fourteen feet square; and the pressage which occasions the rise 
and fall of the mercury in the thermometer wews, by its variation, that 
at one time, when the air is most heavy, such a bod^ sustains a pressure 
externally of 33,905tb ; while, when the pressure is the lightest, the 
pressure on the same body is not more than 30,634lb ; and consequently 
an increase or decrease of weight equal to 3,2811b may be externally 
acting on the body of a person ; and which change he may suffer every 
few hours, as the fluctuations of the mercury evidently proves. 

Now we well know that this vast external pressure, could not be 8us-> 
tained unless it were properly counterbalanced by some adequate means 
of resistance within the said body ; and some internal means of acoom-v 
modating itself to these fluctuations of the atmosphere, which are sup-s 
plied by the Author of Nature to every animal body. Yet that equili-, 
brium which is necessary to ease, is constantly being disturbed; and 
agitations, which may be compared to the ebbing and flowing of the sea, 
are constantly being experienced by every living animal. In a body 
that is robust, and has all its members perfect, pulsation or the natural 
vibration of its organs will soon effect composure ; but where any mem- 
bar or organ is out of order, the free and necessarily i^pid ciiculatioa 



^1» PREFATORY REMARKS. 

of the internal matter is obrtmcted, and pain, or unpleasant sensatioiM^ 
are the conseqaence, nor will these cease untU a perfect equilibrium be- 
tween the internal resistance, and external force, has been restored.— 
Now the human body cannot be materially affected, without the mind 
partaking at the same time of those effects, whether agreeable or psun- 
ful, from which it is plainly demonstrated, that the combined or con- 
trary influences of the planets are constantly operating, to produce cer- 
tain effects on the body and mind of every living bdng on the face of 
the earth, in a manner comparatively similax to uie phenomena of the 
tides of the ocean ; and that the Uvea and actions of men, and the fate 
of individuals and nations, are thus subject in h greater or lesser measure 
to planetary controL 

Therefore (in the words of PUdemy, that ^' Prince of Philosophers") 
^' what therefore hinders, but that he who exquisitely knows the mo- 
tions of the stars, and of the Sun and Moon, and-is not ignorant oi the 
times, nor the place, nor any of the aspects, and is further well skilled 
in their natures, and their efficient powers. — What I say, hinders any 
man thus furnished from knowing, both naturally, and suitably, the 
^ects of all these miseed together, so that he may be able to foretel, in 
every season, the proper state of the air ; as that it will be hotter or 
moister, which he may foreknow by a manifest aspect or ray of the stars 
and Moon to the Sun ? — ^and as it is possible for him that is very well 
skilled in these matters before mentioned, to foretel the qualities of the 
seasons, what hinders but he may likewise predict concerning every imbi. ? 
for, from the state of the ambient at the time of the constitution of each, 
it is easy to know in general the quality and temperament of each person 
bom ; that such he shall be in body, and such in mind, and the future 
events, advantageous or disadvantageous, foreknown by the state of the 
ambient. — Therefore it is apparent that a presage is poesihle to be de- 
duced from these, and sudi like, of the heavenly causes." 

As to the absurd and foolish idea that it is superstitious, unlawful, or 
sinful, to stud^ Astrology, a moment's reflection will convince to the con- 
trary ; since it will be manifest, from the perusal of this volume, that 
every problem is calculated merely by an arithmetical process, devoid of 
any thing resembling divinations. Likewise the consequent prediction 
is deduced therefrom in a demonstrative and strict mathematical way, 
according to a certain chain of causes, which for ages past have been 
found uniformly to produce a correspondent train of effects. — Where 
then consists its sinfulness or its saperstition ? since the whole system 
is founded on the result of actual observation. — If Astrology, which 
foretels future events by the courses of the stars, is sinful or unlawful, 
so were the labors of the late celebrated astronomer Herschel, who nightly 
pored over the starry heavens with his optic instruments, '' guaging the 
Armament" as he expresses it, in search of discoveries. — ^And idike un- 
lawful are the present labors of the astronomer royal. — F^ be it re* 
membered, ikat the Aetroloffer*s koroacope is nothuiff more than a ceJeS" 
tiai map, chart, or pictnre, qf the heavens, for a certain hoar of the day, 
erected on fMnpr, iudffed ac^miinjf to kng established rules, which con- 
not be qf itneff either meritorions or wnlaaifkl; since the map or picture 
of the heavens so east and erected, as well as the stars and planets placed 
therein^ do^n oi«rtainly exist in the heavens at that time, whether the 
Afitrohi^r t^twin hli horoscope or not« — And by predictinff from the said 
eonflgtt ration of tlii* lt0nvi»nly Uodio^ the Antrohtjiicr does but verify and 
fulfil ihttt (mhinitft ol* t)ii> Hnorcd hcriptuifn^ \vhich |K>6itively deeiares, 



PREFAT.OKT REMARKS. '-^ 

that the stars and planets were created expressly for the benefit of man, 
the terrestrial lord of the creation ; and that they were placed in the 
fiimament for '' Signs" of that which s^terwards should come to pass.* 
Therefore, the same vindictive and blotted spirit which would perse- 
cute or contemn the Astrologer for contemplating the heavens, and de* 
daring, in deference to the actual conviction of his. mind, that the stars haoe 
power over all sublunary affairs, would, in the dark ages, have sentenced 
Galileo to the stake, or banished the immortal Newton from the dwel- 
lings of civilized man ! 

To those persons, whether critics or otherwise, who judging irom mere 
hearsay, and foUowing the base track of sla^dsh custom, would proceed 
to pronounce the condemnation of Astrology, without investigating its 
theory, or hearing aught in its defence, (contrary to the inimitable policy 
of British jurisprudence, which in every case wisely endeavours to sound 
the mysteries, and hear the merits of whatever is brought before the 
pultlic tribunal,) the author would just ask, were an illiterate plough* 
man, or an ignorant cobbler, each of whom were ignorant of the theory 
of letters, to deny wi toto, the laws of vision, the problems of longitude, 
parallax, refraction, or any of the more intricate theories of modem 
science, would they not instantlv laugh him to scorn, for declaring his 
absurd denial, of that which his ignorant understanding would not lead 
him to comprehend ? Certainly they would ; and therefore let me im- 
press on the minds of these gentlemen, that however learned they may 
he m other respects, yet if they deliver th^ unqualified veto against 
the doctrines of Astrology, without having first analysed and well ex- 
amined its truth or falsehood experimentally , without proving by the ap- 
plication of its rules to their own horoscopes, that the influence of Saturn 
was not evil, nor that of Jupiter benevolent ; or in a similar way, de- 
monstrating by facts, the actual fallacy of the science, they are acting 
equally as absurd and ridiculous, as the ploughman or cobbler aforesaid, 
which must be self-evident to every one. — Therefore, let those who wish 
to explode our system, first remember the saying of Plato. 

OYAEIX ATEnMETPHTOS EISITfi. 

And until they have cast their own horoscopes, or proved from some 
nativity, or theme of heaven, that there is no truth in Astrology, the 
author can easily bear with their reproaches ; and whatever pompous 
assertions they may bring forward, upon perusing this work, the author 
thereof, as a believer in the system he vindicates, from experience, will still 
have the best of the iurgument, in the opinion of every unprejudiced 
person. 

Neither should the occasional failures of its professors, afford any 
argument against the science itself; since men do not condemn the scrip- 
tures, merely because heresies, and heretical schisms, have arisen there- 



* I am well aware that it is quite anfashionable, at present, to qnote scripture io 
support of my theory, bat for the better proof of what I have advanced as above, 
let the candid and impartial reader consult Gen. i. 14, 15. Deut. xxxiii. 14. 
Psalm xix. 1. and xix. 3. Judges v. 20. Job xxxviii. 31. Amo» v. 8. Job ix. 9, 10. 
Wisdom of Sol. vi. 22. Ecclesiasticus xliii. 6', and numerous other passages of 
holy writ, where the influences of the stars is recorded. 



X PREFATORY REMARKS. 

from ; nor do they deny the art of the physician, through his own ineffi- 
ciency, nor explode the whole science of chymistry, merely hecause the 
chymist fails in some of his analytical experiments. — ^Why then should 
Astrolo^ry (iUmey which of all other sciences, claims the most serious 
and undivided attention^ become the butt of incredulity^ through the 
sins of its professors ? 

In looking deeply into the sympathies of nature, which we are ood- 
stantly experiencmg, we can hardly quarrel with those who have ascribed 
to them an agency more than we can comprehend. We see a gift of 
foreknowledge strongly implanted in the badger, the hedgehog, the fox^ 
the hare, and almost every animal with which we are acquainted. — We 
see also that birds and reptiles have a surprising forecast : and who can 
fail to perceive effects constantly working oetween the heavenly bodies, 
and the bodies and souls of mankind- — whether their exists an etherial 
effluvium that is communicated from one body to another^ and which 
produces those strange sjrmpathies we are witnessing, is not to be de- 
clared : — 

*^' Nil fine magno 
Vita labore dedit mortalibus.*' 

Horace. 



we know they are produced ; and being able to connect them with what 
we term "planetary irdkience,** is sufficient to show, we have sound and 
sufficient ground-work for forecasting the effects incident to known 
causes — and this is all the Astrologer contends for in the ''BOOK OF 
THE STARS " 

Throughout the whole of the present treatise, the utmost care has 
been taken to faciliate the student in the knowledge of each Astrological 
problem. No obsolete or difficult tables are inserted therein, (merely to 
puzzle the reader, as too many writers have heretofore been guilty of^) 
and when to these considerations, are joined, the important diagrams — 
the judiciously selected horoscopes — and the elegant engravings which 
adorn, while they illustrate the work — ^the author confidently trusts it 
will appear evident, that neither labor, pains, nor expense has been 
spared to render the present volume the most valuable treatise on Astro- 
logy, that the English nation has yet produced — and more worthy of 
popular support than any work of tne kind that has preceded it. 



EXPLANATIONS and REFERENCES 



TO THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



1. %%t etngcmn Vifpntu Zitit* 



An embleinatical representation of the pag^e of Ancient His- 
tory, illumined by the lig'ht of Celestial Science, and thereby 
noTeiling' the secrets of future times, which the horoscope and 
ibe yarious Astrological signs are found to intimate. 

3. V^ Ifitxn^fif^it of t|e late tntunc €clfp£e- 

The ominous configurations of the Heavenly Bodies at the 
instant of the aboTe occultation, are faithfully depictured, by a 
prophetic glance at their various effects ; which the Engraving 
(by an eminent artist) clearly exhibits. 

To/ace the Title Page. 

S. W^t JKiatttitiW Ifowtopt of tl^e Ifitog of QbiglanQ. 

An emblematical and Astrological view of the benefits con- 
ferred upon the British nation, through the fated reign of this 
puissant monarch, — and whose nativity is seen replete with 
Vemarkable verifications of Astral influence. 

To face Page 141. 

4. A WOOD ENGRAVING OF THE LATE PRINCESS 
CHARLOTTE'S FATAL HOROSCOPE. 

Page 179. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 
Historical and intro- 
duotort remarks on 
the antiquity, veri- 
ty, and utility, op 

' AStROLOGY - - 17 to 39 

Elementary principles 

OF THE science - - 40 

Solar system - - 42 

A CELESTIAL 'TABLE OF THE 
MAGNITUDES^ PERIODS^ &C« 

Of the planets - •< 44 

Phases of the moon - 45 

Comets - - - 46 

The fixed stars - 48 

The galaxy . . 50 
Revolutions among the 

fixed stars - 51 
Distances of the fixed stars 52 
Divisions of the starry hea- 
vens - - - 54 
Table of the 12 signs 55 
Names and characters of 

ditto ... 57 
Division of the signs 58 59 

Aspects of ditto - 60 

Signification of ditto 61 

Aries - - 61 

Taurus - - 62 

Gemini - - 63 
Cancer - .64 

Leo - - 64 

Virgo - - 65 

Libra - . . 66 

Scorpio - - 66 

Sagittarius - - 67 



Capricorn 

Aquaries 

Pisces 



Page 
68 
68 
69 



Celestial influences of 
the planetary orbs. 

OfHerschel - - 70 
Of Saturn - - 72 
Of Jupiter . - 75 
OfMars - - 77 
Of the San . - 79 
Of Venus - - 83 
Of Mercury -w - 86 
Of the Moon - - 89 
A diagram of the 12 houses 91 
A diagram containing the 
significations of the 12 
houses, according to au- 
thors - - 94 

Effects of the 12 houses 
OF heaven. 



The first house 
The second house 
The third house 
The fourth house 
The fifth house 
The sixth house 
The seventh house 
The eighth house 
The ninth house 
The tenth house 
The eleventh house 
The tv^elfth house 



95 
96 

97 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
104 
106 
107 



CONTENTS. 



ZIU 



Page 
A diag^m of the manu- 
script significations of 
the houses of heaven, 
not found in authors 109 
Perpetual tables of the ce- 
lestial houses, for cast- 
ings nativities and erect- 
ing* themes of heaven 

110 to 115 
Perpetual tables of the 
Sun's right ascension 
in time - - 116, 117 
InstractioDs for casting the 

figure of a nativity 1 1 8 

A scheme of nativity * 122 
Explanation of White's 

Epbemeris » - - 123 
Copy of an Ephemeris 124, 125 
Directions for placing the 

planets in the horoscope 126 
A table of the most emi- 
nent fixed stars 129 
A sideral horoscope 131 
Essential fortitudes and de- 
bilities of the planetary 
bodies . 132 
Table of ditto according 

to authors .133 

Table of ditto according 

to the author's system 135 
The zodiacal aspects 136 

Order of application 139 

A celestial diagram, exhi- 
biting, at one view, the 
whole of the mundane 
aspects 140 

The doctrine of nati- 
vities • 141 
Space of life . . 142 
The giver of life . ib. 
The anareta • .143 
Signs of a violent death 145 
Nature and quality of the 

mind 149 

Riches and poverty 152 

Signs of wealth . ib. 



Signs of poverty 
The fortune of rank 
Of marriage 



Page 
153 
154 
. 156 
Of children 157 

Of travelling 158 

Of friends and enemies 159 
Quality of the profession 160 
Parents and relations 162 

To calculate the times of 

events .163 

Important discovery of the 
celestial periods of the 
planets .164 

Table of ditto 165 

Effects of ditto 166, 167 

Progressive directions 168 
Nativity of his late ma- 
jesty, calculated by the 
Astronomer royal 170 

Nativity of the late queen 

Caroline . . 172 
Primary zodiacal direct 

tions . . 173 

Mundane primary direc- 
tions to the angles 175 
Mundane combined direc- 
tions . . 176 
Rapt parallels . 177 
A table to measure the 

time in all celestial arcs 178 
Nativity of H. R. H. Prin- 

cess Charlotte . 179 
Calculations of her death 180 
A remarkable horoscope 183 
Nativity of R. M. a satirist 184 

a great traveller 185 

— a naval gentle- 
man . . 186 

■ one who died 
insane . 187 
the Duke of 



Wellinsrton 



188 



Arcs of direction in ditto 190 
Nativity of young Napo- 
leon . 192 



XIV 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
Nativity of the king of 

England . 195 

Horary Astrology 196 
Terms of art used in ditto 198 
A diagram to measure time 

in ditto . 201 

The effects of the lords of 

the houses . 204 

An illustrative diagram 210 
Horoscope of London 

Bridge . .214 

Horoscope of " The book of 

the stars" . .217 

State Astrology . 218 
Entrance of Sol into Aries 224 
An. illustrative diagram 



Page 
peculiar to state Astro- 
logy . 224 
The new vAoon of the year 226 
Ingress of Sol into s £b Vf 228 
Eclipses . . 230 
Diagram of an eclipse 233 
Prophetic observati6ns 

thereon . . .234 

Duration of the effects of 

eclipses . 239 

Of comets 240 

Meteors and unusual ce- 
lestial phenomena 246 
Mystic signatures of the 
. seven planets . 247 



A MANUAL 



OP 



ASTROLOGY. 



Ik the newspapers of February 18S0^ the death of a Mr. Samuel 
Hemmings was noticed. It was stated^ that he had been an ironmonger 
and prosperous in trade — ^that he was born on the 4th of June 1738^ at 
nearly the same moment as his late majesty George III, and in the same pa- 
rish of St. Martin's in the fields ; — ^that he went into business for him- 
self in October 1760^ when his late majesty came to the throne ; — ^that he 
married on (the 8th of September 1761>) the same day as the king : and 
finally, after other events of his life had resembled those which happened 
to the late king^ that he died on Saturday, January 9,9th 1820^ on the same 
day, and nearly at the same hour as his late majesty ! 

Query. After such an authenticated and luminous instance as the 
foregoing, where the lives of two individuals bom at the same moment, 
corresponded in every remarkable particular, even in life and death ; can 
the Astrologer be justly accused of superstition or absurdity, should he 
pronounce the fates of mankind to be subject to planetary influence ? 
Or can any rational mind, upon mature and sober reflection, attribute the 
foregoing most pointed agreement in their destinies — ^to mere chance ? 



MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



'^ Beautiful stars, in other days 
The prophet's eyes might read your rays, 
And tdl of many a strange event 
Of warfare and of warning sent.** 



HISTORICAL AND INTRODUCTORY REMARKS 
ON THE ANTIQUITY, VERITY, and UTILITY op the SCIENCE. 

THE celestial science termed Astrology, or the doctrine of 
the stars, may be properly defined the art of foreknowing and 
predicting future events, by the motions, positions, configura- 
tions, and influences of the planetary orbs, and various celestial 
phenomena ; as eclipses, comets, and peculiar aspects of the 
most powerful stars : deduced from various experimental obser- 
vations of the philosophical enquirer, through a series of ages, 
commencing with the earliest known records ; whereon i^ 
founded a system that neither the revolutions of empires, the 
fall of the mightiest monarchies, nor the physical changes in 
the moral and intellectual world, have been able to annihilate : 
but which, like the fabled phoenix of old, has not unfrequently 
arisen, splendid and beauteous, even from its own ashes. And 

B 



18 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

while in former times it might be compared to a mighty 
Colossus that overstrode all other sciences, commanding the 
submissive homage of kings and princes ; or, like " the bright 
star of the morning," heralding the path of learning, and en- 
, lightening the way to knowledge : In modern times, it has 
not unfrequently, in its etherial circuit, asserted its supremacy 
above other perishable arts ; by some remarkable prediction 
(or curious coincidence, as the fashion of the day is pleased to 
term it) that could not have been founded on any natural con- 
jecture, but which like *' a meteoric flash" has so enlightened 
the gloomy atmosphere of incredulity, that the thinking part 
of mankind, who are not content with judging these myste- 
rious matters upon mere hearsay, have been half inclined to 
believe in the pqssMlity of presdence by the etherial orbs. 

" Knowledge ; by favour sent 
Down from the empjrean, to forewarn 
Us timely . ■ ■ 

For which, to the infinitely good, wc owe 
Immortal thanks*' 

MlLTOV. 

The antiquity of the Astrological Science, and of Celestial 
Observations, may be fairly inferred from what was spoken by 
the all wise Creator of the universe ; who is said in the sub- 
lime language of the sacred scriptures, to have " prepared the 
light */* to have formed the celestial orbs, and appointed them 
fcy the Almighty fiat, " to be for signs and for seasons, and for 
days and for years." Whence it is probable that the human 
i^ason never existed, without some portion of this heavenly 
knowledge being diiAised amongst mankind ; because, inde« 
pendent of motives of ctiriosity> which may of themselves ex^ 
cited the wisest of the ancient philosopbers^ to contemplate the 
splendors of the celestial canopy — ^It i\ easy to perceive that 
some parts of the 8cien<^e answer such essential purposes to man- 
kind, that they could not be dispensed with. Instance, the 
irising and setting of the planetary orbs and the constellations ; 
peculiar to the seasons — whereby the antediluvians, no doubt, 
were enabled to order their most important transactions ; so nA 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 10 

to euhivate the auspices of favouimble periods ; uid apply the 
beaevolentiiifltteiices of the " Starry orbs" to the arts aod eiuH 
toms of life. Indeed, the pastoral way of livusg^» the aeveiie 
unclouded sky and the longerity, not only of the antediluvians^ 
but of the i^atriarchs of the first agpes, were extrenely IkTonr- 
abie to astronomical observations ; and hence we nay trace the 
causes of the symbolically terrestrial signs, which mankind 
have by conimon consent placed to occupy the heavens. But 
those were probably not *' exalted to the skies/' until mankind 
iiad made some progress in poetry s which Also is of great an«- 
tiquity, having been practised in the very first ages of the 
world, whilst they ** tended their flocks/' Hence, also poetry 
and astrology shioald be combined together, as accompanying 
each other from the earliest ages ; even in the antediluvian ssra. 
This will not derogate from the dignity of these sciences, when 
it is remembered, that the ancient shepherds were not merely 
the vulgar, or illiterate of mankind, for in those times even 
printes did not think U beneath themselves to act as shepherds, 
and to *' watch their flocks," or attend to i>astoral affairs ; 
which can be proved from many instances of the sacred history, 
of Laban, Jacob, David, Job, &c : nay, we know that several 
•ages afteirwards, many of the chief magistrates of ancient 
Rome, had been husbandmen themselves. Thus Luoiua Cin- 
ciMNATUB was found at the plough, when he was lulled to be 
dictator: and Fabrigius CuRiua and Camillus were no less 
skilled in the science of husbandry, than in the art of war. 

Indeed it appears that husbandmen were in such esteem 
among the Romans, that they highly resented the least affront 
oflei^d to any of them, of whiph Soipio Nasioa was an in^ 
stance, for he being a candidate for the place of Edile, meeting. 
i| plain countryman, took him by the hand, and jesting with 
hia on '^ the baldness of his hands," the Rowftns so resented 
it that he lost the Edileship. 

In the unrivalled poems of Virgil, particularly the '' Geor-^ 
giss," the poet has enriched his work, in almost every page, 
with an astrological regard to the months, seasons, the ascend* 
ing and descending signs and consteUc^tions, as though he 
had himself traced effects to their first cfiuse; ^nd by thus 



^0 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGT. 

availing himself of the accumulated wisdom of past ages, re- 
specting the extensive sciences on which he wrote, he produced 
the most beautiful poem on the subject of husbandry that the 
wx>rld has ever beheld. While so just, are the greater part of 
his observations, and so extensively useful, that the principal 
part of them are put in practice in many places of the world, 
even at this very day. Amongst other beautiful references to 
the magnificent machinery of the heavenly host, the following, 
Georg. I. 835.' beginning '* Hoe metuetia eali menses et 
eidera aerva, SpeJ' is veiy appropriate. 

** Id few of this, obaenre the stany wgns. 
Where Satam*s houses and whete Hermes join*--* 
The sovereign of the heav'ns has set on high, 
The moon, to mwV the changes of the sky. 
When southern blasts should cease.*' 

It is also reported by the poet Luoan (observes Dr. Johnson 
wkh '* historical veracity^') that Caesar, the imperial *' Lord of 
the world" " noted the revolutiona of the stars, in the midst of 
preparations for btxtlle." 

According to Josephus, the celebrated Jewish historian, '* our 
first father Adam, was instructed in Astrology by divine inspi- 
rcUion/' Adam taught it to his posterity ; for it appears that 
Seth was so excellent a proficient therein, '' that foreseeing the 
flood, and the destruction of the world thereby, he engraved 
the fundamental principles of his art, in hieroglyphical em- 
blems, for the benefit of after ages, on two pillars of brick and 
stone." Josephus affirms, that '' he saw himself thai of stone 
to remain in Syria in his own time:'* and in the 3rd chapter 
of his first book, he says, that '' man lived so long before the 
flood, to learn the arts and sciences, especially naming Astro- 
logy and Geometry," and in the same work he states, that 
Abraham^ *' having learned the art in Chaldea, when he so- 
journed into Egypt, he taught the Egyptians the knowledge 
of Arithmetic and Astrology." 

The great sir Isaac Newton has the following remarks in re- 
gard to the origin of Astrology. " After the study of Astronomy 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 21 

was set on foot for the use of aavigRtkMi, and the Bgyptknt* 
by the heliacal risinga and aettiqga of the stais, had detenuiied 
Ibe length of the solar year, and by other o bsei f a liona had 
fixed the solstiees, and formed the ized start into asterisBM, all 
\?h]ch was done in the leigns of Ammon, Sesac, Oros, and 
Memnon, oftovi a fAonJoml feort ^fere Gfcrttt/ Nkepsos, 
king of Sais« by the assistanoe of a priest of Egypt, invented 
Astrology ; gnmnding ii en ike oMpesU pf the pUmeU, and 
after the Ethiopians had invaded Egypt, those Egjrptiaim who 
fled from him to Babylon, carried thither the study of Astronomy 
and Astrology. And so says Diodoms, " the Chaldeans in 
Babylon, being colonies of the Egyptians, became famoos for 
Astrology, having learnt it from the priests of Egypt*' 

The eastern noltone have ever been famous for their skill in 
these abstruse sciences, which in those oonntries have always 
served as a ruling principle for the public administration of the 
state. It is true that as Astrology is practised in those despotic 
countries, it is liable to very great abuse ; and in too many in- 
stances has led the way to fanaticism and imposition. But 
these considerations should have no real weight with the cha- 
racter of the science in general, since the most meritorious of 
discoveries, the most pure theories of an abstract nature, are 
liablef to the same objection ; which in fact will always be the 
case, where the fallibility of human nature is concerned. Ac- 
cord iqg to the oriental records, the birth of Astrology is conr 
fottoded with the epocha, of the creation of the world. We 
are informed by their historians^ that the son of Misraim, 
Naorawousoh^ was the first Egyptian prince, and the firstof the 
magicians who excelled in Astrology and (as they never fail to 
add) enchantment. Retiring into Egypt with his family, con- 
sisting of eighty persons, he settled on the banks of the hill, 
built Essous, the most ancient of the Egyptian cities, and com- 
menced the first dynasty of the Missraimian princes, who 
were stated to be cabalists, diviners, and eminently skilful in 
the mystic arts. The most celebrated of these were Naerasch, 
who according to oriental mythology, was the first who repre- 
sented in figures and images, the twelve signs of the zodiac. 
Gharnak, who had the folly to publish these mysterious sq- 



22 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

•ttiiB, aw iliea conceatod by hia tanily. Khasslim, author o( 
tbe niloraeter. Hbrsall, who devoted himself to the worship 
of idols. Sehlouk» who worshipped Are ; Sourid, his son, 
who erected the first pyrsnidfl, and who is also considered as 
the inventor of that wonderful mirror, which the ancient ori- 
ental poets have so much celebrated in their verses: and 
Firawnn; or Pharoah, the last prince o( that dynasty, whose 
name was afterwards attribated to the most iniquitous kings of 
Egypt 

Terrified by the predictions and menaces of Noah, this prince 
endeavoured to destroy that prophet, believing that he should 
prevent, by his death, the threatened deluge. It, however, 
destroyed him and his whole family. Efilimoun alone, chief 
Astrologer of his time, had the good fortune to save himself 
from that general desolation. Admonished in a dreamy to seek 
refbge in the ark of Noak, he flew to Babylon, v^here he ac- 
knowledged the divine mission of that prophet, embraced the 
dogma of the unity of God, and was admitted into the ark with 
all his family. Forming an alliance with Noah's family^ he 
became the ancestor of twenty-six kings of the second dynasty, 
and built the city of iHmfn^fi^, 

Misraim, his descendant, was the depositary of all the ma<!> 
gical and Astrological secrets of the first ages of the world* AU 
bis descendants are sakl also to have excelled in these sciences, 
and in others which the enemie^^ of Astrology have endeavoured 
to link with the science of the stars* From that prince was 
descended the celebrated Elbocd-Sobir, who surpassed all 
his ancestors in the great art of Cabal ; and Adine, his 
son, under whose reign the noted magicians Haroutu and 
Marouth filled the east with their reputation : they were consi- 
dered *' as two demons escaped from hell." Under this reign 
the celebrated magician Nbdoure, established the worship of 
the great idol of the sun. This person, to whom tradition 
attributes a thousand astonishing and incredible events, was the 
author of that inexhcntotibU va$e, which is mentioned by ail 
the oriental poets. 

Of his successors, they who were most distinguished in these 
mysterious sciences, were Schedad, whom the orientals con* 



HISTORICAL REMARKS, ^ 2$ 

aider as the first astronomer, and the father of the signs and 
celestial themes, w houses of hea»en, which he formed from 
viewing the stars and constellations. Mbnmoawousch, the 
first who puhlished these mysteries, and who is said to have 
circulated throughout Egypt several thousand oofHes of Ihs 
work. He was said also to have been the invenlor of warm 
baths ; the institutor of the twelve religious feasts, in honor of 
the twelve signs of the zodiac ; and ia said, by his own single 
genius, to have discovered the aeerets of the philosopher's 
stone: whereby the orientals affirm he acquired " an imtnense 
treasure," by converting simple metals into gold and silver- 
Menawovsch, who is said to have made an ox, the object of 
his adoration. When afflicted by a severe malady, he heard a 
voice announcing his death, except he should have recourse to 
the benign influence of that animal. Under his leign, Egypt 
was desolated by the Arahians, tcho took this opportmuiiy qf 
learning from the Egyptians the Theurgie sciences, by which 
they afterwards acquired such distinguished reputation. 

To the unfortunate view of these sciences. My thqlogy. attri-» 
butes much of the cruelties of the Pharoah of Moses» Terrified 
by the alarming predictions of his Aatrologers, who announced 
his death by the hand of a young Israelite, he commanded, in 
the weakness of his mind, that all the male ehildren of that 
chosen people should be thrown into the Nile. The hand of 
omnipotence, which never fiuls even ftom the most unexpected 
and discordant causes, to produce the desired eifbct, if such be 
his divine will, ordained that this event should opernte for the 
deliverance of the Israelites, and the^ ruin of the tyrant, who 
with his nobles and his whole army, were overwhelmed in the 
depths of the Red Sea. Amidst this general desolation, there 
being no male surviving on whom the widows eonid bestow 
the throne, the oriental writers affirm, that they chose Dblukb. 
the most aged amoi^fst themselves, concerning whom they re- 
count the following tradition, which Is perhaps as wild and 
singular as any to be found in the oriental i«ooids. 

'' To preserve the state from foreign invasion, this queen 
had recourse to the enchantments of Nxdourb, the greatest 
female magician of the country. In the centre of the capital. 



24 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 

she erected a superb edifice of stone, whose four doors fronting 
the four cardinal points, vers decorated with figures and 
images, representing numerous armies. Several thousand per« 
sons were day and night employed in the most active exertions. 
" Now" said she to the queen, " you may enjoy tranquillity, 
your capital and empire are exempt from danger. If an enemy 
should have the temerity to approadi youi combat him, by 
att€u:king the figures, which are on that side of the edifice, to 
which he directs his march ; cut off their heads, break their 
arms and legs, beat out their eyes: the destiny of these figures 
shaU bp that of your enemies.^ The virtue of this magic edi- 
fiee, says the historian, kept in awe all the neighbouring people ; 
and Egypt continued in prosperity during four centuries, till 
the epocha of the destruction of that miraculous building, 
which began under the reign of Licass, and fell down entirely 
under that of Cawmess. It is strange, that the event verified 
the baneful prediction of the fall and ruin of that monarchy. 
In consequence of CaWmess having afforded an asylum to the 
melancholy remnant of the Israelites, who were subjected and 
led into captivity by Nabuohodonosor ; that savage conque* 
ror, irritated by the contemptuous refusal of the Egyptian king, 
made war against him, and killed him in battle: this was fol- 
lowed by the massacre of one part of the nation, the captivity 
of the other, and Ihe entire ruin of Egypt, This remarkable 
de&olation, which the Astrologers had predicted, fortified more 
strongly the popular opinion of these occult sciences. They 
were perpetuated in the nation, notwithstanding the political 
revolutions which it successively experienced under the Baby- 
lonians, Macedonians, Romans, Persians, Greeks, and Maho- 
metan Arabs. 

Amidst the " crash of empires," the vicissitudes of ages, and 
the revolutions of public opinion, (which in no other instance 
had evinced such firmness) these sciences, but more especially 
AsTROLoov, were preserved in Egypt from one generation to 
another ; with various degrees of power and enthusiasm ; now 
reigning *' Lord of the ascendant/' and again suffering a tempo- 
rary wane, as fanaticism occasionally overshadowed its sublime 
truths. Hence these sciences were circulated amongst the differ- 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. ^^ 

eiit Arabian tribe9, by whom they were as much respected as 
in Egypt : indeed the respect entertained for them by the Ara* 
bians in general* contribated in a great degree to the success 
of Mohammed, {n his life we see the favoarable predictions 
of many very celebrated Astrologers of his time ; and among 
others, that of a priest of Eukbaz, who told the uncle of the 
" Prophet/' that all circumstances in his infancy conspired to 
announce that he would be an extraordinary man, and that his 
life should be guarded with the most vigilant attention. As 
also the prediction of another, no less famous in the art, who 
on being presented to him at Bassora, took Mohammed by the 
hand, and exclaimed with transport, " Behold the Lord of the 
World, the Mercy of the Universe,*' &c. These predictions are 
said to have been corroborated by a remarkable vision, which 
Mohammed made known at the beginning of his enterprise. 
He declared, that in a dream he saw the two hemispheres re- 
cede in such a manner, as to show him .distinctly the utmost 
extremities of the east and west. This he explained to his 
disciples, as expressive of the extensive territories and immense 
dominion which, by the decrees of heaven, were reserved for 
those, who in obedience to the Cour'ann, combated for his 
religion. 

The annals of the Othoman empire, and the history of Mo- 
hammedanism, are replete with marvellous events, predictions, 
supernatural warnings, and ominous details ; no less wonderful 
than the foregoing recitals ; some few of which shall be re- 
lated, since they will not only prove interesting to the curious 
reader, but will serve to give an idea of the spirit of that nation ; 
and the extraordinary events which have sprung from their 
wild enthusiasm. 

Osman I. experienced happy presages, respecting the future 
prosperity of his family. A Scheykh, who was an Astrologer, 
who passed a solitary life in the study of the occult sciences,*^ 
came to him, and declared with enthusiastic rapture, that the 
prophet Elijah had appeared to him, and commanded him to 
announce, by his authority, the successful enterprises of Osman ; 
that he should be the brightest sun of the east, and that his pos" 
terity should reign over seven climates ; that is, over all the 



26 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

habitable regions of our globe. Osrtian loaded 4he old ^maa 
with caresses ; he offered him a rieh sabre, and a costly vase. 
He accepted only the latter, and left the young prince with many 
blessings. The prediction became fulfilled, so far as success 
and enterprise were concerned ; and at the height of his sove- 
reign power, Osman recollected the Scheykh,sent him valuable 
presents, and ordered an ample convent to be built in the city 
where he resided, with a considerable fund, which subsists even 
at present 

' The appearance of a Comet, determined the intrepid and fe- 
rocious TiMOUR, in the midst of his quarrels with Bayezbd L 
to decide for war. He. was at first impelled by terror, to pre- 
pare the means of avoiding a rupture with the Othomans, when 
he consulted Abdullah Lissan, at that time the most skilful 
Astrologer of the east, and desired his opinion respecting the 
tendency of the comet. The Astrologer declared that this 
phenomenon having appeared to the west of his 4ominions, and 
of the constellation Aries, could only have an evil influence in 
regard to his enemies, and that it presaged the utmost disasters 
to the Othoman empire* Relying on this prediction, Timour 
determined immediately upon war, refused every kind of accom- 
modation, and entered at the head of a powerful army the do- 
mibions of the empire. The consequences of this war between 
the two heroes of the east, are well known ; as also .the disag* 
tera which befel the Othoman monarchy, after the fatal battle 
of Angora, 

The death of Mourad II. justified a strange prediction. 
This sultan was hunting in the vicinity of Adrinople ; at the 
close of day, as he entered the city, a Derwisch placed himself 
on the bridge over which Mourad was obliged to pass ; as soon 
as he perceived him, he fixed his eyes upon the sultan, and as 
be approached, e^i^claimed in an inspired tone, '' You have no 
time, august monarch, to spare, to impede the progress of that 
abyss, which is the effect of our sins and prevarications against 
the divine law ; you are just approaching the limit of your 
reign, and the laet moment of your life ! The angel of death tV 
already at your door; open your arms, and receive with entire 
resignation, this messenger from heaven." These words made a 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 27 

strong' impression upod Che monarch and his retinae ; he imme- 
diately expressed his profession of the faith, and performed 
several acts of contrition. Convinced that this prediction was 
the decrees of heaven, from hearing that this Derwisch was the 
disciple of a profound Astrologer, he prepared for deaths made 
his will, settled the succession to the throne, and died on the 
third day ; notwithstanding (says the annals,) aU the aid of 
medicine, and every exertion of his ministers, officers, and cour- 
tiers, to prevent the catastrophe. 

The most favourable prognostics accompanied the accession 
of Mohammed It. The Astrclogers foretold that his reign 
should become illustrums by the glories of conquest : he de- 
pended also on the circumstance of his proclamation, which 
happened on a Thursday, the dth day of the week ; and on his 
being the seventh sultan of his family. The following words 
of the Cour'ann were quoted : ^' God hath blessed the fifth and 
the seventh." These predictions had a powerful effect on the 
projects of this monarch, who became the conqueror of Con- 
stantinople, the destroyer of the Greek empire ; and one of the 
most iUustrious princes of his family for genius, talents, and 
taste for learning. 

SeIim I. previous to his turning his arms against Egypt, 
consulted a celebrated Astrologer, who resided at Damas, and 
living like a hermit, had the reputation almost of a saint. He 
assured the sultan iheU victory should attend his steps ; and 
that the kingdom of Eg3rpt should be subject to his power. In 
the transports of his joy, Selim loaded him with kindness and 
honor ; he would not however depart from him, till he had 
learned the fate and duration of his reign. The sage refused 
for some time to comply with his request, but at length obliged 
to yield to his earnest solicitation, he informed him '* his reign 
would conclude before the expiration of nine years ; but that 
from its glorious events, he would hold a distinguished rank in 
the history of nations." At these words, Selim observed a 
melancholy silence, which was only interrupted by deep sighs 
and accents of grief. After a gloomy pause, he desired to know 
the horoscope of prince Suleyman, his son. ^' He shall be 
♦>*PPy/' replied the hermit. " He shall reign near half a cen- 



28 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

tury, and be equally distingtiished by bis splendid actions and 
warlike virtues/' The above observation determined the 
sultan to march ag^ainst his enemies^ and the event having' cor- 
responded with the prediction, he from that moment became a 
prey to fatal. melancholy > and died in the ninth year of his 
reign. 

As the hermit had foretold, hit son, Suleyman I. ascended 
the throne, attended by a thousand presages respecting the 
future splendor of his reign, and the prosperity of his empire. 
These favourable predictions were chiefly founded on the g'ood 
fortune which the Arabians attribute to whole numbers, since 
this sultan was born in the 900th year of the Hegira, and was 
the tenth monarch of his family. Prompted by these circum- 
stances, Suleyman undertook those enterprises which rendered 
his reign so illustrious. He extended the limits of hia empire 
on our continent in three directions, and his reign was indeed 
the most prc8perou8 period of the monarchy. 

In the reign of Selim II. (Id72) there appeared a (hmet, 
which had the brightness and mag>nitude of Venus. This ex- 
cited his apprehensions, which were augmented by the predic- 
tions of his Astrologers, who declared that this phenomenoa 
announced the calamities which' excessive rain would inflict 
upon the empire. Forty days afterwards, says the historianv 
" they imagined themselves threatened with an universal de* 
luge : incessant rains overflowed his dominions in Europe and 
Asia ; laid waste three of his chief cities ; swept away on aU 
sides, men, cattle, houses, and rendered impassable, during* se- 
veral weeks, the bridges and public roads ! This prediction, 
whi<;h is well authenticated by historians, afibrds a striking 
instance of the singular skill possessed by the Arabian Astro- 
logers, and how astonishingly correct those rules must have 
been on which their presages were founded. 

The death of Mohammed. III. was likewise extremely sin- 
gular and remarkable. On entering the seraglio, he met one 
day a Derwisch, who exclaimed in the following terms : " O 
august monarch ! do not slumber over your situation. / an- 
nounce to you a melancholy event, which will happen in/Sfty- 
six days from the present time. The sultan was agitated by 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 20 

this addiess. He soon after sickened^ and really died on the 
Jifty^9%xih day. 

Some months previous to the death of Mourad IV. an Eclipse 
of the Sun, alarming this monarch, he wished to consult a mys- 
terious volume, which Selim L the conqueror of Egypt, had 
brought from that kingdom, with many other curiosities, which 
are still carefully preserved in the seraglio. It is believed that 
this volume, written in cyphers and magic characters, mentions 
the name and destiny of every sultan, and of every sovereign, 
who will reign over Egypt to the end of the world. After 
long and studied diligence, he fancied that he had discovered 
his own name, and his approaching death. In the anguish of 
grief he shut the volume, and denounced a thousand anathemas 
against whoever should hereafter presume to open it. His agi- 
tation was still further increased, on hearing that a Scheykh 
from Mecca, who was considered at Constantinople as a mo&t 
akilful Astrologer, had privately predicted that the month of 
SchewcU, in which the sultan was born, would produce in that 
year (1640) something unpropitious, and that alms should be 
speedily delivered to avert the impending evil. Mourad IV. 
ordered these preventives to be profusely used ; he even opened 
the public prisons, and set all at liberty except assassins ; but a 
prey to his fate, he fell sick and died the 16th day of the month 
otSchewal. 

" The arcana of Astrology,'' as a judicious writer observes, 
** constituted a main feature in the doctrines of the Persian 
magic,'' to which the following extract from the ''Ancient 
Universal History," is appropriate. " In the reign of Darius 
Hystaspis, king of Persia, flourished a celebrated Astrologer, 
whose name wasGjamasp, surnamed Alhakim, or " the wise." 
The most credible writers say that he was the brother of the 
king, and his confidant or chief minister. He is said, by the 
most credible historians, to have predicted the coming of the 
Messiah ; and some treatises under his name are yet current in 
the east. Dr. Thomas Hyde, in speaking of this philosopher, 
cites a passage from a very ancient author, (having before told 
us that this author asserted there had been among the Persians 
ten doctors of such consummate wisdom, as the whole world 



^ A MANUAL OF ASTROLOX>T. 

could not boiist the like. He then gives the author's words.) 
Of these the sixth was GJamaap, an Astrologer who was eoun- 
sellor In Bystaspis. He is the aatfaor of a book intitled Jttdicia 
Gjmaapi^, in which is contained his judg-rnent on the Planetary 
Conjunctions : and therein he predteled that Jesiut should ap* 
pear ; that Mohammed should be born % that the Magian reli- 
gion should be abolished, &c. Nor did any Astrologer ever 
come up to him. '' But of all the provinces of Persia, Choras- 
san is the most famous for producing great men in that art ; 
and in Chorassan, there is a little town called Genabed, aad in 
that town a certain family, which for six or seven hundred 
years past, has produced the most famous Astrologers in Persia. 
And the king's Astrologer is always either a native of that 
place, or one brought up there." 

By the foregoing historical researches into the records of the 
Oriental Nations, we have given' their account of the origin 
and beginning of the Celestiar Science ; biit the ancient Cfreek 
and Roman historians affirm, (pardcularly Diodorus Sicufus) 
that Hercules first brought Astrology into Greece ; and Plutarch 
reports, that Uesiad . practiced the ^rt. But another ancient 
writer (Philostratus) states, that Palamedes^ brfore. the siege of 
Troy, was esteemed skilful in Astrology ; and was the first that 
limited the course of the seasons, and thje ord^r of the months 
by the solar motion. Anaximander, and his scl^plar Anaxi? 
menes, were learned in the art of Geometry and Astrology, if 
we may believe the ancient historians ; as the one is said to have 
discovered Geometrical Astronomy, the other the obliquity of 
the zodiac. Tholes and Democritus also gained a singular 
name in the annals of ancient history, by their foreseeing^ the 
one a dearth, the other a plentiful crop, of olives, whereby they 
not only enriched themselves, but are said to have confounded 
the despisers of their art. Hippocrates, the father of medicine> 
is said to have foretold the plague, which took place long 
before it happened ; and relying on the verity of his foresight, 
it is stated by historians, that he sent his scholars abroad into 
diflferent cities, to be prepared for the dreadful calamity. la 
eonsequenee of this, it is said that ''all Greece looked up tp 
iiim as a God, and decreed to his name the sacrifices of Herr 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 



31 



cules." Anaxagorag is said to have been so addicted to Astro- 
logy, and the cof^templation of the heavenly bodies, that he 
'' accounted not the earth, bnt the heavens to be his country/' 
Affirming himself born for ho other purpose than to contem- 
plate and behold the Sun, the Moon, and the rest of the celestial 
orbs. TkoLeB is knovrn also to have predicted thtit great Eclipse 
of the Sun, in the time of Astyages, which presaged those mu- 
tations in Asia that afterwards took place. ApolUmius Tyaneua 
is said to have travelled over the greater part of Egypt, India, 
Persia, and Chaldea, growing to that admirable perfection in 
the celestial art, that for ius oracnlar presages, he was by the 
persons of those times, " reputed almost as a God, in the shape 
of man*" He is said to have written four books of Astrology, 
which were lost in the confusion of those dark ages. These, 
with numerous others of the ancient worthies, are on record as 
delighting in the astral art. The poet Virgil, who has beeo 
before quoted, andwho was a great mathematician, which in the 
sense of those times, always induded Astrology, and skill in 
the Chaldean mysteries, describes his hero Eneaa, as being born 
under the favourable influence of Jupiter, Venus, and the Sun, 
Horace, Persius,9nd even Auguatue himself, thought highly 
of Astrology. In latter times, we have on record the famou* 
prediction relative to Pieus, earl of Mirandola, who from hi9 
antipathy to the art, was surnamed the Scourge of Astrology^ 
who being foretold by three different Astrologers, that he should 
not live above the age of thirty-three years ; flattering himself 
that the art and its predictions were false and groundless, as if 
he could (as Sir Christopher Heydon observes) " wrangle away 
death, by writing against Astrology." Lo, while he sought to 
prove the art vain, hii own death, concurring exactly with the 
time foretold by the Astrologers, confirmed it to be true ; and 
more actually confuted that which he had written against it, 
than if all the worid besides had conspired to answer him. Thia 
is perhaps the most striking instance on record as to the truth 

of the art. 

In the writings of Nostradamus, the Gallic Astrologer, are 
to be found almost every important event, that for centuries 
past has taken place. A writer in the Gentleman's Magazine 



32 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

(in December 1824) has pointed out to its readers the truth of 
two remarkable prophecies ; one regarding the death of Itenry 
11. of France, who was killed at a tournament, by an unlucky 
thrust in the eye, through the gilt bars of his royal helmet ; 
which event was prophecied and printed full three years before 
it happened. The other, a more remarkable one still, of the 
French revolution, wherein Nostradamus predicts ''that the 
Christian religion would be abolished in France, and many of 
the nobles and clergy put to death." This prophecy was like- 
wise in print so ^arly as the year 1556, or near 242 years before 
the event, which was certainly an instance of singular skill in 
this great Astrologer. 

No less extraordinary to those who are ignorant of the firm 
principles on which this art is founded, was the prediction of 
Guido Bonatua, an Italian Astrologer ; who being at a city in 
Italy when it was closely besieged, he elected a proper time 
for the earl of Montserrat to make a sally, predicting that the 
earl would rout his enemies and obtain a complete victory, but 
not without receiving a slight wound in the knee ; and that the 
earl might be more assured, Bonatus marched out with him, 
carrying every necessary to dress the wound ! The event cor- 
responded accurately and fully with the prediction ; for the 
enemy was vanquished totally, and the earl wounded, punctu- 
ally as he foretold. 

Valentine Naibod, a celebrated Astrologer of Padua, from 
the rules of Astrology, predicted his own death in the follow- 
ing singular manner. . Living at Padua^ he spent his time in 
study, and having considered his own nativity, he found some 
directions approaching, that gave him ground to fear he should 
*' be killed or uwunded taith a sword /" to prevent which, and 
to shun the fate he apprehended* he took in all sorts of provi- 
sions from abroad, to serve him for some months to come ; shut 
and barred all his gates, doors, and windows : and resolved to 
continue there to avoid the mischief, in the mean time, it hap- 
pened that some thieves went by, and seeing the house made 
so secure, supposed, no doubt, that there must be some great 
wealth therein ; and in the night time, breaking into the house 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. .' 33 

vid meetiog with the master thereof, ih^y barbarou0lff fnur^ 
dered him, h& h\% horoscope foteiold, - 

' Michael Scot, a mathematician and Astrologer of the thir- 
teenth trentory , was miieh esteemed hy the ^peror Ffederic li. 
U^ predicted that the emperor should die. at Floreikeej 'wbifili 
firedictipn was answered by the event. He likewise fojretold 
that himself should die with the fall of a eUme ; which hap- 
pened accordingly ; for being in a church at his devotions, jor 
MitnefeUfrom the roof, which gave him a mortal wound. His 
singular predictions caused him to be accused by the vulgar for 
a' magician, although his contemporaries report him as a man of 
learning, andca gteat divine. 

. AfUioehus Tibertus was one of the most famous Astrologers 
of the fifleeiiUit century ; and ^ although his death was very un- 
happy, yet^is sihgMar predictions render _his name immortal. 

^ He was a :nMive: of: a town; in Romagna : a certain officer 
carried'hlmttcK Paris; where he studied; and. where following the 
bent of his genius, he applied himself to the occult sciences, or 
rather to all the branc^hes of that secret and:curious art, caHed 
fMuralmagie. . v.' '-: 

• Conkiderii^giih his own mind that this science had been de- 
cryed'from'its having, been mostly in the hands of. bold, igno- 
rant, and profligate persons, he thought to restore it to its 
former credit and repute, by giving it all the advantages that 
could .possibly be derived from physic, mathematics, natural 
philosophy, history, and the fine arts ; of which he was a per- 
fect master. The pains he took in this respect, were attended 
with rather more success than he anticipated : so much indeed, 
tlat before he quitted France, he had attained a veiry high re- 
piitation, and was considered as the cleverest Astrologer of the 
day. :•'.-■ ■ ♦ • 

* Upon 'his return to his native country, where that sort of 
knowledge was in the highest repute, be found it necessary; 
for his own security, to ingratiate himself with Some of the 
petty tyrants,, or little princes, ' that were ' possessed of the 
se^ral cities and territories in Italy. Nor was it long be- 
fore he gained the confidence of Pandolfo Malatesta, at that- 
time sovereign of Remini, with whom he lived in the greatest 

C 



34 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY 

ease and credit. His reputation was quiekly raised to such a 
heig^ht, (as well by the curious books he published, as by the 
happy yeriftcation of many of his predictions) that bis house 
was continually throng^, either with visitors, who were per* 
sons of distinction, or clients who came to him for advioe ; so 
that in a very short time, he amassed a competent fortune : and 
as he was esteemed, courted, and beloved by persons of the 
higphest rank, lie might, accoiding to appearances, haiiepro^^ 
mised himself a eomfortahle journey through life, and a peace- 
able passage out of it, in his old agCr But fate, (to whose cto* 
crees Antioc^us Tibertus was na stranger) had it seems willed 
otherwise. In a word, he has established his f^me to posterity 
by three irtixmieBtilile predieiiana ; one with respectta his most 
intimate friend ; another in regard to himself ; and the thirds 
relating to the prince his patron. Each of them wludLy tm- 
prolMihle at the time they were delivered ; all of them in«sru- 
table, by the rules of hwman policy or prudence ; and yet all 
, eataeily accomplished. 

This fHend of his was eutefe cfe Bogni, one of the. greatest 
captains of his time, as well as one of the bravest and boldest 
men that ever lived. He was very earnest with Tibertus to 
reveal to him the secret of his. destiny. After consideralde re* 
ludtKnce, this great master of his art declared that Guido wouUl 
oertiiiilly h»e Ma Ufeip the hands of aneoj hia heHfrietuh, 
upon an ill-grounded suspicion. Some time after this, Tibeiliis 
calculated his Wn nibtivil^; and made no scrapie of deetaring 
that himself was fated to loae hia head upon the scaffold. 

Pandolfo,hi8 patron, would likewise have hia horoscope ca^ 
cttliited, whicb Tibertus would willingly have declined; but 
finding it impossible, he would net hazard the credit of his^ art 
by telling a falsity; and therefore, although he. was at that 
time the We/i^f person in all Italy, Tibertus ventured ta ac- 
quaint him, that ajten auffering great waM, he would, die in 
the eammon haapiUd at Bologna. 

Not long after this Guida was made commander^in-ehi^of the 
army of Pandolfo, the aforesaid prince, and patron of Tibertus* 
u|)on which the count de Beulivoglio, who was fatlMar-in4aw 
to that prince, wrote him a letter, in which he assured him. 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 36 

^^ fbiat he bdd made a shephefd of a wolf/' and that Gaido 
" was actively iatrigniDg* with the pope, and bad promised to 
deliver Qp the city of Remint, whenever he desired \U" The 
tyrants of Italy were never men of miicb diseemment, and 
Uierefore the prince Pandolfb^ aft soon t& he had tfaia informal' 
tion, made a great entertainment, to which he invited all his 
favourites, and among the rest QuidOy and TibvrtuB the Astro- 
loger/ Atl^is supper Quido %ba» stabbed, (exactly as the for- 
mer predicted} and as it was suspected that Tibertus, from his 
gyeat intimacy with him, might have some share in the conspi- 
racy, — Hettaa thrown into a dungeon, and loaded with irons. 

It may ea^ly be imagined that Tibertns passed his time very 
unpleasantly itt this dismal situation, and therefore it will not 
be deemed situ^HibiDg, when it is stated^ that he endeavoured 
to seize the tot importunity of escaping which offered. It 
seems the gaolet to whose care Tibertns was committed^ bad a 
daogbter of singularly mild and gentle manners^ whom he at 
length peiBuaded to fornish him with the means of breaking 
out of his dungeon into the castle ditcb/ from whence he might 
easily escape. 

In the interim, count Bentivoglio had discovered that the 
inftcnmiatiOa he gave hii$ celatiou was ill-founded ; and of this* 
he sent him an account, as soon as it was in his power ; at 
wfakfa newsPandolfo vvas infinitely affscted, and grieved at his 
late rai^ and cruel measures^ 

: It was hawevet impossible to recall hift unfortunate general 
GuidOf from tbe grave ; bat he gave instant orders that Tiber- 
tns should be set at liberty. The persons who brought these 
orders, came just at the fall of night, and strange to say, pre- 
cisely at the time that the Astrologer h^d forced his passage 
into the dttch, where, alter a slight search they found him. 

When this was repotted to the tytant, his former Suspicions 
returned apon bim witb redoubled vigour ; and recollecting at 
the same time, the predictiotf of Tibertaa, that he should be 
deprived of his patrimony before his death, he concluded that 
the first information could not be groundless : but that, without 
doubt, tbe Astrologer must be concerned in some such perni- 
cioue design. To free himself therefore from these appreh«»- 



36 A Manual of astrology. 

.sioDS^ he gave orders that the next' morning' Tibertas should be 
Aeheaded, before the prison gate : and thus the second predic- 
tion was verified, in a manner equally strange, and out of the 
reach of human foresight to penetrate unassisted by the rules 
x>f art. Let us now proceed to the third prediction, which 
really took place not long after. 

. It is to be observed that though the intelligence of the count 
proved false, with respect to the persons concerned, which 
very probably was the effects of his own suspicions, yet his 
information was right enough in the main ; for a conspiracy was 
actually carrying on, to place the city of Remini into the hands 
of the pope: and it was accordingly seized by the Duc-de- 
Valenttnois, not long after; but in the confusion which this 
occasioned, Pandolfo made his escape. He fled for 'some time 
from place to place^ vigorously pursued by his enemies, and 
meeting (as is generally the case of tyrants) with very few 
friends ; at length, having endeavoured to sow dissension among 
his own children^ he was abandoned by them, and every one 
^Ise ; inasmuch, that falling ill of a languishing disease at Bo- 
logna, where nobody cared to take him in, he was at last ear- 
ried to the hospital j inhere he dragged out the remainder of his 
days in penury and pain, and at last died there, as the Astro- 
loger had foretold. 

, At the birth of Louis XiV. the king of France, the gentlemen 
of the Royal Academy of Inscriptions, caused a splendid medal 
tb be struck to cbmm^motate the event. Around this m^al 
was placed the twelve signs of the zodiac, forming the twelve 
houses of heaven. The planets were placed rn the same degi^es 
as they then occupied in the heavens. The following was 
given as the interpretation of the celestial theme. '' The sun, 
who gives perfection to the other planets, is in the mid-heavra ; 
Mars, lord of the ascendant, in reception with Jupiter, the pro- 
tector of life ; Saturn, the enemy of nature, is in his dignities, 
which makes him less malevolent. The moon is in conjunction 
with Venus ; and Mercury, in his house of predilection to the 
sun, but out of combustion, giving a superiority of genius in 
the most difficult enterprises ; which his being in square to 
Mars, is not able to abate." Such was the interpretation of 



HISTORICAL R£MARKS. 37 

this monarch's horoscope, which was figcared in the. midst of 
this medal, by a rislDg sun. The. king was placed in the cha- 
riot of this gflorioos planet, of which Ovid has given us a de- 
scription. This chariot was drawn by four horses, guided by 
victory. The. inscription, was in these words : " Ortus Solis 
Gallici.'' " The rising of the Gallic Sun/' and the exergue 
thereof, contained this other inscription. " Sbptbmbris Quinto 
MiNUTis 38 Ante Meridian, 1638." This curious medal ex- 
hibits a remarkable instance of the high reputation in which 
Astrology was held .at the period .of its formation. Neither 
were the predietiong of the Astrologers, relative to. the cele- 
brity of the future '.^ Grand Monarque!' unfulfilled, as history is 
sufficient to prove. 

In. the reign of the, Stuarts, we have many striking ac- 
counts. of remarkable predictions and celebrated Astrologers ; 
but the chief amongst, these (and indeed in the History of 
England) was the.renowned Astrologer WilliamLiUy; amongst 
a series of Astrological Hieroglyphics, relative to the fate of 
the EInglish nation, and to last for several centuries ; Published 
by him in 1651, were two immediately succeeding each other ; 
the first of which represented several dead bodies in winding, 
sheets, a church-yard with sextons employed, and cart-loads of 
dead emptying into the graves. The second was a view of 
London Bridge, on both sides the water, and the city of Londoa 
in flames. Nothing could have more unequivocally predicted, 
the Plague and dreadful fire, (which really succeeded each. 
otheic« as did these hieroglyphics) than the above forewamings,. 
After the fire, and when Lilly had for some time retired from; 
business, and lived at Richmond, the House of Commons sent 
him an xxder to attend at their bar ; when appearing, the. 
speaker informed him, that " as he had fifteen years before pre^ 
dieted the Plague and dreadful fire, the House wished to ask< 
him, if he could give any intelligence concerning the causes or 
authors thereof?". Lilly answered, "that the House might 
readily believe, that having predicted it, he had spared no pains 
to investigate the cause, but that all his endeavours had been 
ineffectual; fipm whence he was led to attribute the confla-. 
gratk>n, to the immediate finger of God." It is singular, that; 



96 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

what this profound Astrologer was unable to disoover^ every 
one else has failed in, even the usual lights which the revalu- 
lion of ages generally throw on snbjectf which, at the period 
of their transaction, may be enveloped in casual gloom, in this 
instance have totally failed to give any real information as to 
the actual perpetrators of the above calamity. 

No less singular was this distinguished Astrologer's presage 
respecting Charles I. In a volume of *' Lilly's Astrology/' pur- 
chased at the sale of the Duke of Marlborough's library, there 
is the following curious note. " The immediate use which 
Charles I. made of one thouisand pounds, which was sent to him 
at Hampton Court, was to Isonsult Lilly the Astrologer/' ^' / 
advised him,'* says the sage, *' to travel eeist^oard, whereas he 
ircnjeUed westward, snd all the world knews the eonsequenee/* 

The deaf A of William, earl of Pembroke, was foretold by 
lady Davy's, to happen on his hirth day in the year \690 (which 
is mentioned in Kushworth's collections). When evening 
came, the earl cheerfully took notice '' how well he was,'' 
saying '^ he would for lady Davy's sake, never trust a female 
prophetess again/' He was notwithstanding found dead in 
his bed next morning ! 

in still more recent times, we have the instance of a remark- 
able prediction relative to the late fallen emperor Napoleon, 
by a celebrated French Astrologer. Observing that in Napo- 
leon's horoscope ^' the planet Saturn was in the house of honor, 
he declared, without hesitation, that '' at the moment when the 
meridian altitude of his power should be obtained : from that 
period he should meet with a dfecKne, as rapid as his elevation 
and be finally deserted by his friends." After the fall of Napo- 
leon, this circumstance was noticed publicly in the French 
journals. And if Napoleon's horoscope tc^ere correct, the above 
configuration of the " evil orb" was quite suflScient to authorise 
the afbresaid prediction, on the most rational grounds. 

Numerous other instances are on record, which we could 
readily adduce in support of the astonishing verity of this art, 
in judicious hands , but let those suffice. The Sacred Scrip' 
tures abound with the most beautiful imagery, derived from 
the heavenly host ; thus we are told by the inspired writers. 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 39 

that " they fought from heaven, the stars in their courses/aught 
against Sisera." Again, *' so let all thine enemies perish ; Aat 
let them that love hlm« be as the sun, fvhen he goeth forth of 
his might :'* and according to the most ancient and approved 
Astrologjj ^' the person who shall have the sun for his signi- 
fwaXor, well dignified, will be invincible in battle." In another 
place, the sacred writer declares, '' the sun shall not smite thee 
hy datf, nor the moon by night," which plainly refers to the 
oflSce of Hyleg, or what is termed by Astrologers, '* the Lord 
of life,'' which is always chosen from " the sun by day, and the 
moon by night" Also it is declared, that *' to every thing 
there is a season, and a time to every purpose under heaven," 
&c. which plainly relates to the doctrine of "Astrological 
Elections," or the choice of appropriate " times and seasons," 
for the most important purposes ; wherein it is observed, that 
** there are times so peculiarly propitious to the spirit of enter- 
prise, that if a man were to go out to battle, although assisted 
by a comparatively small force, yet he shall obtain the victory ; 
while there are other times, when with a mighty army, more 
completely equipped, instead of laurels, he shall acquire no- 
thing but disappointment and disgrace." The sacred writers 
also speak of the '' sweet influences of the Pleiades," and the 
'* bands of Orion." In short, Wherever we searchi whether 
amongst sacred or profane historians, numerous instances are 
to be found, which set forth the astonishing pfesages of this 
formerly respfendent science; which even in the rniiis that 
time and the revolutions of public opinion have brought upon 
it, is grand and magnificent, and like the starry host, from 
which its principles are derived, continues wherever its stu-* 
pendoiiB footsteps are traced, to soar above all other arts, even 
by the lofty and dignified nature of its pretensions ; but when 
these pretensions are backed by truth, and demonstrated by the 
light of philosophic reiearch, it may be asserted, without fear 
of contradiction, that there exists not a science more truly sub* 
lime, or more generally interesting, than the celestial science 
of the stars. 



36 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

.siops, he gave orders that the nexf moniing Tibertos should be 
,hekeaded, before the prisoo gate : and thus the second predic- 
tion was verified, in a manner equally strange, and ont of the 
reach of haman foresight to penetrate unassisted by the rales 
x>f art. Let ns now proceed to the third prediction, which 
really took place not long after. 

. It is to be observed that though the intelligence of the count 
proved false, with respect to the persons concerned, which 
very probably was the effects of his own suspicions, yet his 
information was right enough in the main ; for a conspiracy was 
actually earring on, to place the city of Remini into the hands 
of the pope : and it was accordingly seized by the Duc-de- 
Valentinois, not long after ; but in the confusion which this 
occasioned, Pandolfo made his escape. He fled for 'some time 
from place to place, vigorously pursued by his enemies, and 
meeting (as is generally the case of tyrants) with very few 
friends ; at length, having endeavoured to sow dissension among 
his own children, he was abandoned by them, and every one 
^Ise; inasmuch, that falling ill of a languishing disease ai Bo-- 
logna, where nobody cared to take him in, he was at last car" 
ried to the hospital, inhere he dragged out the remainder of his 
days in penury and pain, and at last died there, as the Astro- 
^ger had foretold. 

■ ' At the birth of Louis XIY. the king of France, the gentlemen 
of the Royal Academy of Inscriptions, caused a splendid medal 
to be struck to cbmm^inolrate the event. Around this mcfdal 
was placed the twelve signs of the zodiac, forming the twelve 
housiies of heaven. The planets were placed in the same degiees 
as they then occupied in the heavens. The following was 
g^ven as the interpretation of the celestial theme. '' The sun, 
who gives perfection to the other planets, is in the mid-heaven ; 
Mars, lord of the ascendant, in reception with Jupiter, the pro- 
tector of life ; Saturn, the enemy of nature, is in his dignities, 
which makes him less malevolent. The moon is in conjunction 
with Venus; and Mercury, in his house of predilection to the 
sun, but out of Combustion, giving a superiority of genius in 
the most difficult enterprises ; which his being in square to 
Mars, is not able to abate.'' Such was the interpretation of 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 3? 

this monarch's horoaeope, which was figared in the. midst of 
this medal, by a rising sun. The. king was placed in the cha- 
riot of this glorious planet, of which Ovid has given us a de- 
scription. This chariot was drawn by four horses, guided by 
victory. The. inscription, was in these words : " Ortus Solis 
Gallici." '' The rising of the Gallic Sun/' and the exergue 
thereof, contained this other inscription. " Septbmbris Quinto 
MiNUTis 38 Ante Meridian, 1638.'* This curious medal ex- 
hibits a remarkable instance of the high reputation in which 
Astrology was held .at the period. of its formation. Neither 
were the predictions of the Astrologers, relative to. the cele- 
brity of the future "Grand Monarque'/ unfulfilled, as history is 
iofficiept to. prove. 

In. the reign of ih^, Stuarts, we have many striking ac- 
counts.of remarkable predictions and celebrated Astrologers ; 
but the chief amongst, these (and indeed in the History of 
England) was the.renowned Astrologer WilUamLilly ; amongst 
a series of Astrological Hieroglyphics, relative to the fate of 
the English najtion, and tq last for several centuries ; Published 
by him in 1651, were two immediately succeeding each other ; 
the first of which represented several dead bodies in winding, 
sheets, a church-yard with sextons employed, and cart-loads of 
dead emptying into the graves. The second was a view of 
London Bridge, on both sides the water, and the city of London 
in flames. Nothing could have more unequivocally predicted, 
the Plague and dreadful fire, (which really succeeded each, 
othe^^as did these hieroglyphics) than the above forewarnings. 
After the fire, and when Lilly had for some time retired from; 
business, and lived at Richmond, the House of Commons sent: 
him an jorder to attend at their bar ; when appearing, the: 
speaker informed him, that " as he had fifteen years ^before pre- 
dicted the Plague and dreadful fire, the House wished to ask^ 
him, if he could give any intelligence concerning the causes or 
authors thereof?". Lilly answered, ''that the House might 
readily believe, that having predicted it, he had spared no pains 
to investigate the cause, but that all his endeavours had been 
ioeflTectual; from whence he was led to attribute the confla-. 
gration, to the immediate finger of God.'' It is singular, that^ 



36 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

.siops^ he gpave orders that the next' morDing^ TibertQS should be 
jbeheaded, before the prison gate : and thus the second predic- 
.tion was verified, in a manner equally strange, and out of the 
reach of human foresight to penetrate unassisted by the rules 
of art. Let us now proceed to the third prediction, which 
really took place not long after. 

. It is to be observed that though the intelligence of the count 
proved false, with respect to the persons concerned, which 
very probably was the effects of his own suspicions, yet his 
information was right enough in the main ; for a conspiracy was 
actually carrying on, to place the city of Remini into the hands 
of the pope : and it was accordingly seized by the Duc-de- 
Valentinois, not long after ; but in the confusion which this 
occasioned, Pandolfo made his escape. He fled for 'some time 
from place to place, vigorously pursued by his enemies, auA 
meeting (as is generally the case of tyrants) with very few 
friends ; at length, having endeavoured to sow dissiension among 
his own children, he was abandoned by them, and every one 
^Ise ; inasmuch, that falling ill of a languishing disease di Bo^ 
logna, where nobody cared to take him in, he was at last edr" 
Tied to the hospital, adhere he dragged out the remainder of his 
days in penury and pain, and at last died there, as the Astro- 
loger had foretold. 

• At the birth of Louis XIV. the king of France, the gentlemen 
of the Royal Academy of Inscriptions, caused a splendid medal 
tb be struck to cbmm^molrate the event. Around this medal 
was placed the twelve signs of the zodiac, forming the twelve 
hou^s of heaven. The planets were placed in the same degrees 
as they then occupied in the heavens. The following was 
given as the interpretation of the celestial theme. '' The sun, 
who gives perfection to the other planets, is in the mid«heaven ; 
Mars, lord of the ascendant, in reception with Jupiter, the pro- 
tector of life ; Saturn, the enemy of nature, is in his dignities, 
which makes him less malevolent. The moon is in coi^junction 
with Venus ; and Mercury, in his house of predilection to the 
sun, but out of dombustion, giving a superiority of genius in 
the most difficult enterprises ; which his being in square to 
Mars, is not able to abate.'' Such was the interpretation of 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. 39 

tliat " they fought from heaven, the stars in their courses f ought 
against Sisera." Again, " so let all thine enemies perish ; but 
let them that love him^ be as the sun, when he goeth forth of 
his might :" and according to the most ancient and approved 
Astrology^ *' the person who shall have the sun for his signi- 
Jicator^ well dignified, will be invincible in battle/' In another 
place, the sacred writer declares, '' the sun shall not smite thee 
by day, nor the moon by night," which plainly refers to the 
oflSce of Hyleg, or what is termed by Astrologers, " the Lord 
of life,'' which is always chosen from '' the sun by day, and the 
moon by night" Also it is declared, that " to every thing 
there is a season, and a time to every purpose under heaven," 
&c. which plainly relates to the doctrine of "Astrological 
Elections," or the choice of appropriate " times and seasons," 
for the most important purposes ; wherein it is observed, that 
'* there are times so peculiarly propitious to the spirit of enter- 
prise, that if a man were to go out to battle, although assisted 
by a comparatively small force, yet he shall obtain the victory ; 
while there are other times, when with a mighty army, more 
completely equipped, instead of laurels, he shall acquire no- 
thing but disappointment and disgrace." The sacred writers 
also speak of the '' sweet influences of the Pleiades," and the 
'' bands of Oridn." In short, Wherever we searohi whether 
amongst sacred or profane historians, numerous instances are 
to be found, which set forth the astonishing pi^sages of this 
formerly resplendent science; whieh even in the rains that 
time and the revolutions of public opinion have brought upon 
it, ia grand and magnificent, and like the starry host, from 
which its principles are derived, continues wherever its stu-* 
pendoBS footsteps are traced, to soar above all other arts, even 
by the lofty and dignified nature of its pretensions ; but when 
these pretensions are backed by truth, and demonstrated by the 
light of philosophic reiearch, it may be asserted, without fear 
of contradiction, that there exists not a science more truly sub* 
lime, or more generally interesting, than the celestial science 
of the stars. 



86 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

.slops, he gave orders that the next' morning Tibertas should be 
Jbekeaded, before the prison gate : and thus the second predic- 
.tion was verified, in a manner equally strange, and out of the 
Teach of human foresight to penetrate unassisted by the rules 
of art. Let us now proceed to the third prediction, which 
really took place not long after. 

. It is to be observed that though the intelligence of the count 
proved false, with respect to the persons concerned, which 
very probably was the effects of his own suspicions, yet his 
information was right enough in the main ; for a conspiracy was 
actually carrying on, to place the city of Remini into the hands 
of the pope : and it was accordingly seized by the Duc-de- 
Valentinois, not long after ; but in the confusion which this 
occasioned, Pandolfo made his escape. He fled for 'some time 
from place to place, vigorously pursued by his enemies, and 
meeting (as is generally the case of tyrants) with very few 
friends ; at length, having endeavoured to sow dissension among 
his own children, he was abandoned by them, and every one 
^Ise ; inasmuch, that falling ill of a languishing disease at Bo^ 
logna, where nobody cared to take him in, he was at last edr" 
ritd to the hospital ^ ithere he dragged out the remainder of his 
days in penury and pain, and at last died there, as the Astro- 
loger had foretold. 

• ' At the birth of Louis XIV. the king of France, the gentlemen 
of the Royal Academy of Inscriptions, caused a splendid medal 
to be struck td cbmm^ftiotate the event. Around this mcfdal 
was placed the twelve signs of the zodiac, forming the twelve 
housiies of heaven. The planets were placed in the same degrees 
as they then occupied in the heavens. The following was 
given as the interpretation of the celestial theme. '' The sun, 
who gives perfection to the other planets, is in the mid-heaven ; 
Mars, lord of the ascendant, in reception with Jupiter, the pro- 
tector of life ; Saturn, the ei^emy of nature, is in his dignities, 
which makes him less malevolent. The moon is in conjunction 
with Venus; and Mercury, in his house of predilection Co the 
sun, but out of combustion, giving a superiority of genius in 
the most difficult enterprises ; which his being in square to 
Mars, is not able to abate." Such was the interpretation of 



HISTORICAL REMARKS. d? 

this monarch's horoscope, which was fig^ared in the. midst of 
this medal, by a rising sun. The. king was placed in the cha- 
riot of this glorious planet, of which Ovid has given us a de* 
scription. This chariot was drawn by four horses, guided by 
victory. The. inscription, was in these words : " Ortus Solis 
Gallici." " The rising of the Gallic Sun/' and the exergue 
thereof, contained this other inscription. '' Septbmbris Quinto 
MiNUTis 38 Ante Meridian, 1638." This curious medal ex- 
hibits a remarkable instance of the high reputation in which 
Astrology was held .at the period .of its formation. Neither 
were the predictions of the Astrologers, relative to. the cele- 
brity of the future '^ Grand Monarque'/ unfulfilled, as history is 
sufficient to. prove. 

In. the reign of the, Stuarts, we have many striking ac> 
eounts.of remarkable predictions and celebrated Astrologers ; 
but the chief amongst, these (and indeed in the History of 
England) was the.renowned Astrologer WilliamLilly ; amongst 
a series of Astrological Hieroglyphics, relative to the fate of 
the English nation, and to last for several centuries ; Published 
by him in 1651, were two immediately succeeding each other ; 
the first of which represented several dead bodies in winding, 
sheets, a church-yard with sextons employed, and cart-loads of 
dead emptying into the graves. The second was a view of 
London Bridge, on both sides the water, and the city of London 
in flames. Nothing could have more unequivocally predicted, 
the Plague and dreadful fire, (which really succeeded each. 
othei;,as did these hieroglyphics) than the above forewarnings. 
After the fire, and when Lilly had for some time retired from; 
business, and lived at Richmond, the House of Commons sent 
him an jorder to attend at their bar ; when appearing,, the: 
speaker informed him, that '' as he had fifteen years l^fpre pre-, 
dieted the Plague and dreadful fire, the House wished to ask^ 
him, if he could give any intelligence concerning the causes or 
authors thereof?", Lilly answered, "that the House might 
readily believe, that having predicted it, he had spared no pains 
to investigate the cause, but that all his endeavours had been 
ineffectual : from whence he was led to attribute the confla- . 
gration, to the immediate finger of God." It is singular, that; 



46 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY 

of this beautiful object^ tbo cause of these appearances are per- 
haps not so much thought of as they would be> were they less 
frequent. The moon is an opaque spherical body, which ap- 
pears luminQus> only in consequence of reflecting the light of 
the sun, and consequently can only have that side illuminated 
which is turned towards the sun, the other side remaining in 
darkness ; therefore it is evident that we must perceive differ- 
ent portions of her illuminated, according to her various posi- 
tions, with respect to the earth and sun. 

At the time of an^'unetion, or when she is between the earth 
and the sun, or the new moon, she is then invisible to the earthy 
because her enlightened side is then turned towards the sun, 
and her dark side towards the earth. In a short time after the 
conjunction, she appears like a fine crescent, soon after the sun 
sets, which crescent begins to fill up, {tnd the illuminated part 
to increase, as she advances in her orbit ; and when she has 
performed a fourth part of her revolution, she appears to be 
half-illumined, being then in h&tfir$t quarter. After describ- 
ing the second quadrant of her orbit, she is then opposite to 
the Sun, and shines with a round illuminated disc, which is 
called the faU moogu After the full, she begins to decrease 
gradually, as she moves throogh the other half of her orbit ; 
and when the eastern half of her only is enlightened, she is 
said to be in her tkird quarter; thence she continues to de* 
crease, until sh^ again disappears at the eof^unction, as before. 
These various phases plainly show that the moon does not 
shine by any light of her own ; for if she did, being globular, 
she would always present a fully illuminated disc, like the sun. 
That the moon is an opaque body is proved by her occultation 
of the stars ; for her body often comes between the earth and 
a star, and while she is passing it, the star is lost to view. 

OF COMETS 

Comets are supposed to to be solid opaque bodies of various 
magnitudes, with long transparent tails, resembling a pale 
flame, and issuing from the part of the comet farthest from the 
sun. They move round the sun in very elliptic orbits, and cross 
the orbits of the planets in all directions. From the curved 



ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. 47 

direction of Iheir paths, Newlon concludes th&t when they dis- 
appear they go much beyond the orbit of Jupiter, and that in 
their Perihelion, they frequently desoend within the orbits of 
Mars, and the inferior planets. He computed the heat of the 
comet which appeared in 1680, when nearest the sun, to be 
two thousand times hotter than red hot iron, and that it must 
vetain its heat until it comes round again, even if its period 
should be more than twenty thousand years, and it is computed 
at only Ave hundred and seventy-five. 

Mn, Whiston has conjectured that the deluge, of which in 
the sacred writings we have the only authentic record, but of 
which the annals of most nations have traditionary accounts, 
was produced by the near approach of a comet, whose atmos- 
phere had been attracted by the earth ; and he further sur- 
mises, that the final catastrophe foretold in the scriptures, may 
be produced by the approach of a comet prodigiously heated in 
its perihelion. We pretend not, however, on such subjects as 
these, to penetrate the secrets of Almighty wisdom, which can 
produce its own ends, by means of which we have no con- 
ception. 

Such is the solar system, and the basis upon which it rests 
is, that the sun, and not the earth, is the centre of it ; and that 
the earth is not fixed, but revolves round the sun like the other 
planets. That this system is true, and agreeable to the consti- 
tution of nature, is certain, from the observations which have 
been made by the greatest philosophers ; aided by telescopes, 
and all the assistance of mathematical and physical knowledge. 
When the heavens are beheld from the surface of the earth, or 
even fromits centre, the motions of the planets appear to be 
very unequal, and not to observe any regular course ; and there- 
fore we may certainly conclude, that the earth is n^t the centre 
of their motions. He, therefore, who would observe the real 
motions of the planets, must place himself in the centre of the 
sun, or not fkr distant from it, and then all the various pheno- 
mena would be perfectly regular, and exactly such as they 
would be if the earth was the centre, round which the sun and 
planets revolved. 

Another proof of the motion of the earth, is drawn from 



48 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

physical causes. Sir Isaac Newton has proved, that all the pla- 
nets gravitate to the sun ; that is> are attracted by it ; and that 
when two bodies gpravitate to each other> without directly ap- 
proaching to each other in right lines; they intist both turn 
round their common centre of gravity. > The .sun and the earth 
therefore both turn round their common centre of gravity ; but 
the sun is a body so much larger than the earth, viz. a million 
times, that the common centre of gravity- of the earth and sun> 
must be within the body of the sun itself, and not far from 
its centre. The earth therefore turns round a point which, is 

within the body of the sun, and therefore turns round the sun. 

♦ ••■.-, 

OF THE FIXED STARS. . 

No part of the universe affords such exalted ideas of the 
structure and magnificence of the heavens, as the considerations 
of the number, magnitude, nature, and distance, of the fixed 
stars. We admire indeed, with propriety, the vast bulk of our 
own globe ; but when we consider how much it is surpassed 
by most of the heavenly bodies, what a point it degenerates 
into, and how little more, even the vast orbit in which it re* 
volves, would appear, when seen from some of the fixed stars » 
we begin to conceive more just ideas of the extent of the uni- 
verse, and the boundless infinity of creation. 

^* How nuuiy bright 
And splendid lamps, shine in heaven^s'temple high^ 
Day hath his golden sun, her moon the night. 

Her fixM and wandering stars, the azure sky.*' 

Fairfax. 
. The Axe4 stars comprehend all the celestial objects, except-* 
ing the sun, the moon, the planets, and those comets, that occa- 
sionally appear. The stars y on account of their apparently 
various magnitudes, have been distributed into several classes 
or orders. Those which appear largest are called Stars, of the> 
first m^ignitude ; the next to them in lustre, stars of the 
second magnitude, and so on to the sixth, which are the small- 
est that are visible to the naked fl^e. This distribution having 
been made long before the invention of telescopes, the stars 



ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES OF THE. SCIENCE. 49 

which cannot be seen without the assistance of those initra- 
ments, at<Q distingtiished by the name of telescopic stars. 

Astronomers have supposed " the innumerable multitude of 
fixed stars to be so many suns, each of which is attended by a 
certain number of planets or habitable worlds like our own, as 
well as visited by comets. The strongest argument for this 
hypothesis is, that the stars cannot be magnified by a telescope, 
on account of their immense distance ; whence it is concluded, 
that they shine by their own light, and are therefore so many 
suns : each of which we may suppose to be equal, if not supe- 
rior, in lustre and magnitude to our own. They are not sup- 
posed to be at equal distances from us, but to'be more remote, 
in proportion to their apparent smallness. This supposition is 
necessary to prevent any interference of their planeisj and thus 
there, may be as great a distance between a star of the^r«^ 
magnitude, and one of the second, apparently close to it, as be^ 
tween.the earth and the fi;ced stars. 

.Others object, that the disiippearance of some of the fixed 
stars is. a demonstration that they cannot be suns, as it would 
be in the highest degree absurd, to think that God would create 
a sun, which might disappear of a sudden, and leave its planets 
aifd their inhabitants in endless night. But this argument will 
have no weight, with those who believe in the doctrines of Re-^ 
velation ; which assures us, that our world will come to an end, 
and that our sun will he deprived of his light, and, conse-i 
quently^ that all the planets which circulate around him, will 
be involved in darkness. In short, there is nothing inconsistent 
with either scripture, or reason, iu supposing, that while infl-« 
Qite space is universally filled with illuminating suns and cir<« 
culating planets, each world, or rather each £olar system of 
worlds, has its own periods of creation, duration, and final con-^ 
summation ; as we are assured ours has bad, and will have. 
And the discoveries of Astronomers respecting old stars disap-^ 
pearing, and new stars being observed, are perfectly consistent 
with the . doctrines of creation and dissolution ; which aU Chri^^ 
tian4 profess tQ believe, with regard to our own solar system, 
^nd.the globe we inhabit. 

' D 



W A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



OF THE GALAXY, OR '' MILKY WAY." 

" A bToad wd ample road whose dust is gold 
And pAvement stan, as stats to thee appear. 
Seen in the ^toxy, that milky way, 
Which nightly as a circling sone thou seest 
Fowder*d with stars.* 



»» 



The Gakupff, or <* milky way/' is a ligbt coloared irregular 
cirel€ or band, which encompasses the heavens, and is distin* 
giiishable from the *'etherial blue," by iU brilliancy. It ap^ 
pears like a shining zone, which owes its splendour to the in« 
numerable stars of which it is formed, and which passea through 
many of the constellations in its ample range* 

Dr. Herschel surveyed this peculiar part of the heavens with 
a powerful telescope, twenty feet io length, and with an aper- 
ture of eighteen inches. With this powerful instrument he 
found that it completely resolved the whitish appearances into 
Mtars. The portion he first observed was about the hand and 
club of Orion, in which he found an astonishing muliUud^ of 
stars, whose number he endeavoured to estimate> by coudting- 
many fields (or apparent spaces of the heavens, which he could- 
see at once through his telescope) and computing from a me-*^ 
dium of these, how many might be c<Matained in a given portion 
of tho " milky way." In the most vacant place he found 63* 
stars ; the other six fields contained 110, 60, 70, 00, 7d, and 74 
stars, a medium of all, which gave 70 f<>r the number of stars 
in each field. Thus he found, that by allowing 15' for the dia- 
meter of his field of view, a belt of 16^ long and 2^ broad, which 
be had often seen pass before his telescope sn an kour*s time,' 
could not contain less than 60,000 stars, large enough to be 
<listinct1y numbered / besides which, he suspected imee as many 
more> which could not for want of light be scarcely perceived* 

Dr. Herschel also remarks, ** that the milky way, is a most 
extensive stratum of stars, of various sizes, admits no long- 
er of real doubt; and that our sun is one of the heavenly 
bodies belonging to it, is as evident. I have now viewied and 
guaged this ehining zone in almost every direction, and find it 



£L£M£NTAR7 PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. 51 

composed of shining stars, whose nomber e^o^yMHtly increases 
and decreases, in praportion to its appaieat hfi^titness to the 
naked eye." 

BEVOI-UTIONS AMONG THE HXED STARS. 

The fixed siafs are liable to changes ; several stars observed 
in former times by the ancients, are now no longer seen^ and 
new ones have appeared, aqknown to the apcients. Sqme of 
them have disappeared for a tine, and then beoQme again vi- 
sible. Some have been observed to increase in soperlative 
Instre ; then decreasing, have, by degrees, vanished from the 
sight even of the best telescope. 

Hippardhua observing an unknown star, in order that pos* 
terity should Icfarn whether any of the stars perish, composed 
a catalogue of the stars. Tyeho Brake, after several ages^ ob- 
served another new star, and in the philosophical transactions, 
we have accounts of several. 

The first new star in the chair of Cassiopeia was not seen 
by Cornelius Gemnio, on the 8th of November 1573, although 
he that night considered the heavens in a very serene sky, and 
saw it not ; but the next night it appeared, with a splendour 
aurpcisaing all the fixed stars, and scarcely les9 bright than 
Venus. Tyeho Brake observed it on the i ith of the month ; 
but from thence he assures us, that it gradually decreased and 
died ataay, so that in Marcli 1574, after sixteen months, it was 
no longer visihle, and at this day no signs of it remain. 

September 30, O. S. 1604, such another star was seen and 
obserVied by the scholars of Keplpr, in the constellation 8er^ 
pentarius. It broke out at once with a lustre surpassing that 
of Jupiter; and' like the former, in nearly the same time, died 
away gradually, and of this, there are no footsteps to be noip 
seen. 

Between these, in 1596, we have the first account of tfaa 
wonderful star in Collo Ceti, seen by Fabrieius on the 3rd of 
August, as bright as a star of the 3rd magnitude, which has 
been isince found to appear and disappear periodically, lis 
period being precisely seven revolutions in six years, though 



'b2 A MANUAL OF ASTR0L06T 

'it retanis not always with the nine lustre, nor is it ever totally 

"^xtiogoishecU hat may at all times be seen with a six feet tabe4 
Another new star was discovered hy Hevelins, July 15, 
1600, as a star of the third magnitude, hot so waned in lustre, 
that by the beginning of October it ¥ras scarce to be seen. In 
April following, it was brighter than before, yet wholly disafH 
petxred aboal the middle of Aognst. The next year iq Miuch 
]602> it Was seen again^ bat not exceeding the etarl4 magni-> 
tade; since then, it has been no further meMe, thoogh fre- 
qtently sought aftor by,AstnMiomers. 

' Mr. G. Kir A in 1686 discovered another, whose period was 

M04^ days. In Aagast this star is visible to the naked eye, hot 
in December scarcely to be seen. It is brightest in the month 

-of September. Independently of these, may be mentioned a 
star, well known to Astrologers, GopiU Algci, a nariaUe star ;. 

>its period is 9 days 21 hoars. It remains for 2 days 14 hoars,. 

.as a star of the second magnitade ; in aboat three hoars and a^ 
half it declines to a star of the/onrtlt magnitade ; and in threet 
hoqrs and a half more, it reeumes its second magnitade, which 
it retains for 2 days 14 hoars, as before. & in L^a likewise 
has a period of 12 days 19 hoars, daring which time it appears 

•of different magnitades, from the third to the fifth ; « in iliUt- 
n9ue, has a period of Id. Ah. 38m. ; and ^ in Cepheue, of 6d. 
Sh. Sim. 'No doubt all these changes have a manifest effect on 
the earth, which may probably produce some of those strange 
vicissitades that baflSe the wisest to determine, and for whicb^ 
even the Astrologer may be at a loss to accoant. 

OF THE DISTANCES OF THE FIXED STARS. 

As to the distances of the stars, no method of ascertaining 

them has yet been discovered. They are so extremely remote, 

that we have no distances in the planetary system wherewith 

'to compare them. The distance of the star Draconis, appears, 

' by Dr. Bradley's observations, to be at least 400,000 times that of 

the own ; and the distance of the nearest fixed star, not less than 

40,000 diameters of the earth's annual orbit, that is, the true 

Sdistance from the earth of the former star is 38,000^000,000,000 



ELEMENTARY PllINClP.I^ES. OF THE SCIENCE. ^ 

•miles; Bdd t)f the latter (the nearest star) not less than 

.7,600,000>000«000 miles* As these distaooes are immeiisefy 

.greats it may both be amusiog, and help to a clearer and more 

familiar idea> to compare them with the velocity of some movingr 

body, by which they may be. measured. 

The mpi/l€9t motion wet kpow of, is that of ligh$ ; which 
passes from the sun to the earth in about eight minuiea: and 
yet this would be ab^e six. years traversing the first space, 
and near a y^ar and a qnarier, in passing from t^ho nearest star 
to the earth ; but a cannon baU, moving on a medium at the 
rate of about twenty miles iu a minute, would be three million 
eight hundred thousand years in passing from JDraconis to the 
earth, and seven hundred and sixty thousand years passing 
•from the nearsst fixed star, Sound, which moves at the rate of 
about thirteen miles in a minute, would be five million six hun*- 
dred thousand years traversing the former distance, and one 
million one hundred and twenty-eight thousand years in pasr 
sing through the la$ter. The profound Astrologer Huygena, 
^tuvued speculations of this kind so far, as to believe it not 
impossible that there may be stars at such inconceii)abl€ liisr 
ianeest that their light has not yet reached the earth since the 
creation ! 

f* How Aiitant some of diise taocturnal suns ! 

"So dif tant, nyt the sage, *twere not absurd 
> To doii|yt, if beams Bet out at nature's birth 

Are yet arrived^ at this so foreign world ^ 

Though nothing half so rapid as their flight, 

An eyv of awe and wonder let me roll) 

And roll for ever ! Who can satiate sight 

Ii^ such % soeno— in such an ocean wide 

Of deep .astonishment ? where depth, height, breadth, 

Are lost in their extremes ; and where to count 

The thick-sown glories in thb field of fire, 

Perhaps a seraph's computation fails." 

. . Young. 

The recent discoveries of the late Pr, Herschel (to whose 
labours the Royal Astronomical Society of London are adding 



&4 A ItfANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

" tttioi«8 Df^i^dfilidietMd'O Wdfd lidglilftHy rdniArkabte ;— they 
pto^^ Ih6 flU^ itHM to bft iminMse, tliQir r^idtift nfibbUnded, 
ttUd p^rti&pfei ittfi&ile. As tte IlUftl, ^o&lrafy to the planets, 
th\i^ tike oat suil by lh«i# tMI^ naiiv^ light, philotoph^n tup- 
pose, that each of them is the ^AttO Of a iyfttem of iiihMted 
^M:U8\ Mrhi^h i^evolve around U» A judiolOllls VrHiar ob^drves, 
"Uiiderthid idfea ^r petimasiod, of how iAnaifletabl« a Uttnily 
do we i^eem to i^ake a pan I the immetteity of the uaivene be- 
coikies peopled with reiioW beingpS) and We feel an interest at 
what appeiM to be ^iogf On at distanoea so vast, that what we 
see, as in litao pi^esent. We have reason to believe (swift, iTv^on- 
^vabtf Mift as is the process of li|^t« darting' ttoia the 
spheres) binst have happeaed ag«s a^. Under the idea of the 
nniverse beings replenished with human being«> how mafnii^ 
tsent, tiow awAil, are the spectacles that present themselMi te 
the observer of the heavens I the ereatui« of a day, of. a few 
ileetingr MOliientS) seems to obtain a glimpse of a new cmation, 
a g^litnpse of the end of time in the passing* away of a system/' 
What an amazing eoneeptioD> if human imagination can 
conceive it> does this give of the works of the Creator I thou- 
sands of tfaonsands of sun8> taaltiplied without end, and ranged 
all around us» at immense distances from each other, attended 
by ten thousand times ten thousand worlds, revolving in bound- 
less space, upheld by nothing, confined by nothings yet pre- 
served in their rapid course, calm, regular and harmonious, in- 
variably keeping the path assigned to them by the mighty arti- 
ficer of the universe ! 

OF THE DIVISIONS OF THE STARRY HEAVENS. 

** As when the moon, Kfhlgezit lamp of nigbt 
O'er heav*ns «leir «im««, tprMids her ilM»ted light ) 
When not a breath distnrbe the deqp «evene, 
And not a cloud o'ereasts the solemn scene : 
Around her throne the vivid planets roll. 
And stars unnumbered gUd the glowing pole. 

The ancient shepherds, during the silent watches of the 
night, (as they slept in the open air) having no other objects 
to contemplate, than the view which the heavens above pre* 



£LEM£NTART PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. 5/$ 

ftented, soon be^tn io divide " the fintaam^nt of stars into par- 
ticular eonstellaiioos, acco^liog' as they aiiyoined each other, 
till the beavenr were filled vrith symbolical objector and those 
which coold not be formed into those clusters of stars* which 
they brought together^ were denominated " unformed stars." 
By this division, the stars were easily distinguished from each 
other; and by help of a celestial globe, on which the constel- 
lations are delineated, any particular star may be easily found 
in the heavens, the most remarkable stars being placed in such 
parts of the asterisms or .constellations, as are most readily dia- 
tingnished. 

The heavens are thus divided into three parts. 1. — The zo- 
diat, which is a great circle extending quite round the hea- 
vens, nearly sixteen degrees broad, so as to take in the different 
orbits of the planets, as well as that of the earth's satellite, 
the moon ; in the middle of which is the Ecliptic, or the path 
of the sun. 2. — All that region of the heavens which is on the 
north side of the -zodiac, containing twenty-one constellations ; 
and 3. — ^The whole region on the south side, which contains 
fifteen constellations. 

With these constellations, Aatrologera confine their observa- 
tions to twelve only, which are denominated the twelve eigns 
of the zodiac. 



Names. 



9riC0 

Qbnntf • • * • 
vnmm •••• 
Canor •••• 

tto 

Oltgo • • • • 

I4ka 

vcei'ffo • • • t 

Capriceniiti 
ZtpmiM . , 

l&iMttft .... 



• • 



English Names. 



The Ram 

The Bull 

The Twins 

The Crab 

The Lion 

The Virgin 

The Balance 

The Scorpion 

The Archer 

The Goat 

The Water Drawer. . 
The Fishes 



Number of 
Stars in each. 



66 

141 

85 

83 

95 

110 

51 

44 

69 

51 

108 

113 





i 





^6 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY^ 

Independent of other. Astrological symbols, these iwelt^Signs 
answer to the twelve nionths in the year ; some have indeed 
imagined that the figures under which they are represented » 
are descriptive of the different seasons, according to the path ^ 
of the greater luminary ; thus the first sign Aries, ** denotQj^^'^IIP^ 
that about the time when Sol enters into that part of the ecliptic 
the lambs begin to follow the sheep : that on the sun's approach 
to the second asterism, Taurus, the cows usually bring forth 
their young. The third sign, now Gemini, was in former times 
represented by two kids, and signified the time of the goats 
bringing forth their young, which are usually two at a birth \ 
while the former, the sheep and the cow, commonly produce 
-only one. The fourth sign. Cancer, denoting the crab, an ani- , ^^ 
mal that goes sideways and backwards, was placed at the^'^ 
northern Solstice, where the sun begins to return back again 
.from the north to the southward ; this answers to the time of 
obr longest days, after which the day gradually decreases, as the 
sun has left his greatest northern declination. The fifth sign Leo, 
denoting the lion, a furious animal, was thought to represent the 
heat and fury of the tropical sun, when he enters this sign. The ^ 

succeeding sign, the sixth in order, Virgo, the maid, received the ^' 

sun at the time of the ripening corn, and the approaching bar- & 

vest ; and in former times, the sign was expressed by a maid at- ^j 

tired as a female reaper, with an ear of corn in her hand. The 
ancients gave to the next sign, both Libra and Scorpio, two of 
the twelve divisions of the zodiac ; as autumn, which amrds 
fruits in great abundance, affords the means and causes of dis- 
eases : and the succeeding time, being in general the most un- 
healthy of the year, was expressed by this venomous animal, 
here, spreading out his long claws into one sign, as if threaten- 
ing mischief, and in the other, brandishing his tail to denote 
the completion of it.' The next sign, Sagittarius, denoted the 
fall of the' leaf, and the season for ancient hunting) for which 
reason, the stars which marked this constellation, were repre- 
sented by a huntsman, with his arrows and his club, the "wesL- )^ 
pons of destruction for the Jarge creatures he piirisued. The 4|y 
reasons of the wild goat's being chosen to mark (the sign ^ 
Cc^ricorn) the southern solstice, when the suii has attained ^ 



fiL£MENTAIlY PRINCIPLED OF THE SCIENCE. 57 

his greatest mmthem declination, and begins again to tnouAt 
iQorthwaTd, lengthening the days, is obvious enough; the cha- 
racter of that aniinal being, that it is mostly climbing, and 
ascending some mountain as it browses: There yet remains 
two signs of the zodiac to be accounted for, with regard to 
their origin, viz. Aquarius and Pisces.-^As to the former, it Is 
to be considered, that the winter is a wet and uncomfortable 
season ; this therefore was shown by Aquarius, the figure of a 
man pouring out water from an urn* The last of the zodiacal 
constellations, Pf«ce«> was represented by a couple of fishes 
tied together, that had been caught ; the lesson was, " The 
severe season is over; your fiocks do not yield their store ; but 
the seas and rivers are open, and there you may take fish in 
abundance.'' 



THE DiVlfflONS OF THE TWELVE 9IGNS. 

The ffodfoo being a great circle of the sphere, is divided into 
three hundred and sixty degrees, every degree is subdivided 
into sixty other divisions, called mtnWe«,and eVery minute into 
sixty seconds, thirds, fourths, and farther, if necessary. 

Names and Stfmholical Characters, 
Northern Signs. Souther^ Signs. 



r attt0 

n ^tMxA 

.^ Cancet 

Si leo 



£b libra 

1Y|, Scorpio 

t dai0ttar(tt«; 

Vf Capdcornnn 

r::: flqtiaritts 

K P<ce0 



These signs are placed above, so that the student may most 
readily discern which are opposite to each other ; thus Aries is 
opposite to Libra, Leo to Aquarius, and so in due order, which 
is requisite to be perfectly known in casting a celestial theme 
of heaven, as the horoscope of a birth or other remarkable event. 






58 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOOT. 

Tiie 'Jir$tm sighs are called fwrihern, because they decline 
from the ^uator towards the north pole ; and the laiier six are 
termed 0mUkem, as decUningf the cobtrary way« to the south 
pole. . This zodiac cuts the equator in two opposite points , 
thM is, ip the beginning' of jtfn'e* and Libra, which are there- 
fore called the equinoctial points. 

The twelve signs of the Kodiac are further divided into four 
trigons or (r^lieities, thus, 

Y SI t we the fiery Trigon. 

n ^ oj ate the airy Trigon. 

Q itg ^ are the earthy Trigon. 

as tit K ttre the watery Trigon. 

Fiery signs, are in nature hot and dry ; airy, hot and moist \ 
earthy f cold and dry ; and the watery, cold and moist. 

In properties, they are thus divided ; 

r ffi :^ Vf are moveable signs. 
ii Tit S2 are fixed signs, 
n ^ t H Are common signs. 

Of these also, r SL / n la « the/«ry and airy tripli- 
cities i^re masculine signs. 

^ iT|^ Vf s HI K the earthy and toatery 
triplicities are feminine signs. 

T £k ^ Vf 9LTe cardinal signs. 

s yf alone, are tropical signs. 
T ^ alone, are equinoctial signs* 

s Q tip r^v trt ^ are signs of right ascension. 
Vf t;:: K T b n are signs of obHpie ascension. 

n ^ H aro bicorporeal, or double-bodied signs, 
s rn. H are termed fruitful signs, 
n Q tQ^ are termed barren signs. 

They are also divided into four parts, answerable to the four 
quarters of the year, thus, 

r b n are vernal, belonging to the ' Spring quarter, in 
nature sanguine, hot, and moist. 



EL£M£NTAltT PftlNCII^LES OF THfi SCIENCE, ^^ 

$ J2 tv)^ &re (StstivAl, h^lotigifkg to the Sttuittier quarter, in 
nature h6t, dry, and tfaol^fie. 

^ ni f are diuhcimuil, Apptdplriated to th6 Autumn quarter, 
and are cold« dry, and melanthdiy. 

yf ^ H are hyemal, as given to the Winter quarter, and in 
nature are cold, moist, and phlegmatic. 

Also, s in. K are mute signs. 

U ^ iHi rsi faUBiaiM ligns. 

Vf bestial signs. 

SI t f^taliigns. 

T O Si yt quadrtipedian, olr four-footed signs. 

The planets, moving in the twelve signs^ form various angles 
and configurations with each other, and from their influx, the 
generation and corruption of all sublunary things ate caused ; 
these are, 

Igi ItWUW^f in nature cold, dry, and windy. 

J} datncn, cold and dry, 

1/. Slnpiter, hot and moist. 

($ SPirjf, hot and dry. 

O ^l> or the <kim, hot and diy. 

i (Hemtf, cold and moist. 

$ 9^rciiti^ variable and controvertible. 

D ittas, the Q^oon, cold and moist. 

The moon in her ascending 'node, is deem^ by the ancient 
Astrologers, of benign influence^ and in her cUscending node, 
the contrary, or unfortunate : these nodes hte termed the Dra- 
gon's Head and Tail. In nativities, the author of this work 
rejects theif use, deeming them as useless appendages to his 
system of celestial philosophy, unhss the moon Should be in the 
very degree of her nodes, when it may be allowed, that corres- 
pondent effects in good or evil will follow, as there would cer- 
tainly be some cause for the presumed effects, which otherwise 
there cannot be ; they are characterised thus, 

3 The Dragon's Head. 
es The Dragon's Tail. 



60 JL MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 

Another symbol us^d by Astrologers in the calculation of 
nativities and other celestial schemes* is the part of fortune 
thus marked ©, which is the true mundane distance between 
the sun and moon, projected from the ascendant, which will, 
be spoken of hereafter. 

The aspects of the planets are as follows. 

^ The aextile, which is two signs of the zodiac, or sixty 

degrees. 

□ The quartile or square, three signs or ninety degrees. 
A The trifie, or. triangle^ four signs or a hundred and 

twenty degrees. 

J> The opposition, ovowhM the zodiac, a hundred and 

eighty degrees. 

J The cor^unctiori, or the same sign, degree and minute. 

The system of Astrological presages is founded on the va- 
rious positions and configurations of certain orbs, presumed 
(from the experience of centuries of ages) to produce certain 
effects ; and being built on a basis, which is thus consonant to 
reason and experience, should certainly merit a fair trial, 
'ere the whole art and its students are set down for " impos- 
tors/' as too many writers of the present day are pleased to 
term it, by a mere begging of the question, and by mere asser- 
tions, not proofs. And yet such is the stupid incredulity of some 
persons, whose . tpsediant alone» seems as the .standard for the 
faith of thousands^ that they have scarcely a clear idea of the 
real or assumed principles of that art, which they generally 
term " exploded," and in other ways betray their ignorance, in 
abusing that which the wisest of them have no cqnception of, 
and which they are generally too idle to analyse. 



£L£]tf£NTART PRINCIPLES OP THJ& SCI£NC£. 0] 



THE SIGNIFICATION OF THE TWELVE CELESTIAL 

SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

*** Now, cauie still evening on ; and twilight grey 
Had in her sober Urery all things dad ; 
Silence was pleased : now glow'd the firmament 
With livid sapphires : Hesperus, that led 
The starry host, rode brightest ; till the moon 
Rising in clouded majesty, at length, 
Apparent queen, unveil*d her peerless light. 
And o'er the dark her silver mantle threw/' 

Aries, the house of Mars and exaltation of the Sun^ or the 
first sio^n of the zodiac, is a vernal, dry, flery, masculine, cardi- 
nal, equinoctial, diurnal, moveable, commanding, eastern, chole- 
ric, violent, and qnadrupedian sign. Persons born solely under 
this constellation, (if unmixed with the rays of either of the pla- 
nets) are in stature rather tall, of a strong and spare bodily con- 
formation ; dry constitution, long face and neck, thick shoulders, 
piercing eyes, black eye-brows, sandy or red hair, and sallow or 
swarthy complexion. In disposition resembling Mars, hyAhe 
ancients termed the lord of this sign, viz. hasty, passionate, vio- 
lent^ and intemperate. These are the natural qualities of this 
sign ; but a good aspect of Mercury, or the moon, to benevolent 
planets, will materially alter the judgment for the better, and to 
ill planets for the worse. This must invariably be remembered 
by the student ; for in Astrology, the majority of astral causes, 
and not general or universal principles, must be considered, 
judiciously combining the various testimonies for good and evil 
together, as a skilful chymist would arrange the materials on 
which he operates ; and after well weighing each aspect, un- 
prejudiced by the case under consideration, and comparing 



02 A, MANUAL OF A$TltOLt)OT. 

each by the known effects of starry influence, the interpretation 
of each si^ and aspect will be plainly discovered. (The same 
remarks will hold good in every other sign ; they will there* 
fore not be repeated.) 

This sign governs the head and face. Its diseases are the 
small pox, ring worms, eruptions, measles, fevers, convulsions, 
epilepsy, apoplexy, palsy, baldness, and all diseases peculiar to 
the head and fac9> And which prpc^ from hwt, oholer, and 
aridity, or a dry constitution. It is generally considered as 
a barren sign. 

Every sign in Astrology is said to govern or reign over cer- 
tain regions, countries, and cities ; and those under Aries are 
England, France, Switzerland, Oermany, Denmark, Lesser Po- 
land, Syria and Palestine, Naples, Capua, Verona, Florence, 
Padua, Marseilles, Saragossa, Burgundy, Cracow, &c. Its 
colours are wbite and red. In horary questions, it denotes 
pasture grounds, where cattl^ frequent, dry sandy soils, and 
hilly gronndSi the cieling or covering of houses, stables, kilns, 
hiding places for tbi^vey, ftnd places not generally knom^ or 
frequented ; also warrens, preserye^ for g»mp, or places for 
small cattle, lands recently enclosed or ploughed, and such like. 
It is generally thoqght to be a fortunate sigp ; although in 
that particular this description is too general and vague to be 
depended oo, without other testimopials. 

Taurus is a 'cold, dry, melancholy, feminine, nocturnal, 
southern sign, of short ascension ; the house of Venus^ and the 
exaltation of the moon. The native born under it, if the sign 
be unaspected by stars of a contrary nature, is generally re- 
markably stout and athletic, broad forehead, thick lips, dark 
curly hair, short neck, dull and apathetic, slow to anger, but if 
once provoked, exceedingly cruel and malicious. It governs 
the neck and throat. Its diseases are melancholy, a consump- 
tive habit, scrophula, croup, defluxions of rheum, disorders of 
the throat, wens or eruptions in the neck, &c. It is generally 
reckoned to be a sign fruitful in nature. 



£LBM£NTART PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. 6^ 

It reigns over Irelaod, Great Poland, part of Russia, Holland, 
Persia, Asia Minor, the Archipelago^ Mantua, Leipsic, Parma, 
Nantz, Franconia, Lorraine, Sous, Bythynia, Cyprus, &c. Its 
colours are red mixed with citron. In horary questions, it de- 
notes cow houses, stables, places holdingc Agrricultural \m* 
plenients, pasture grounds far from houses, grounds lately made 
arable land, trees, chimnies, cellars and excavations in the 
earth. It is generally deemed w\f^riunate. 

Gemini is the house of Mercury, and by the ancients termed^ 
the exaltation of the Dragon's Head ; (this latter the Author 
rejects as superfluous ;) it is a hot, moist, sanguine, masculine, 
northern, diurnal, western, commanding, bicorporeal sign ; in* 
jfluencing the ambient so as to produce a tall and straight sta-> 
tore, of a dark sanguine complexion, dark hazle eyes, quick 
sighted and piercing, dark brown hair, smart active look, always 
in motion ; and from the number of fixed stars of the first mag* 
nitude in this sign, it produces persons of greater intellect, and 
more powerful invention and genius, than any other sign of the 
zodiac. It governs the arms and shauldere. Its diseases aro 
head aches, brain fevers, corrupt blood, bilious complaints, fits 
or mental delirium ; and if afSicted by evil planets, insanity. 
It also denotes falls, fractures, and bruises, especially falls from 
high places. It. is barren in. nature. 

It rules over the south-west part of England, Ana^nca, Flan* 
ders, Lombardy, Sardinia, Armenia, Lower Egypt, London, 
Versailles, Brabant, Wittenburgh, Mentz, Bruges, Louvaine, 
Cordova, and Nuremberg. Its colours are red, blended with 
white. In horary questions, it denotes the wainscot, plaster- 
ijog, and walls of a room. Chests, desks, studies, libraries, 
eoifera, bams, granaries, dep6t8, hilly places, mountains ; and 
from late discoveries^ it is thought to denote aerial apparatus, as 
balloons, and aerostatic machines, of every description. It i.s 
(anaspeeted or possessed of evil stars) a fortunate sign by 
nature. 



M jl manual of astrology. 

Cancer is the sign of the iEstival or Summer tropic, cold, 
watery, phlegmatic, femiDiDe, cardinal, northern, commanding, 
nocturnal, moveable, weak, mute, and particularly frvitful 
sign, more so, perhaps, than any other sign in the zodiac It 
is the house of the, Moon, and exaltation of Jupiter; produ« 
cing a native of fair, but pale, complexion, round face, grey 
or mild blue eyes, weak voice, the upper part of the body large, 
slender arms, small feet, and an effeminate constitution. It go- 
verns the breast, and the whole region of the stomach. Its dis- 
eases are asthmas, shortness of breath, disorders of the chest 
and lungs, pleurisy, coughs, consumptions, loss of appetite, in-^ 
flammations of the vital parts, cancers, dropsy, and imposthumes* 
It also gives great fear of insanity, if malific stars are angular. 
Its colours are green and russet. 

It governs Scotland, Holland, Zealand, Burgundy, Africa, 
Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli, Constantinople, Amsterdam, Cadiz, 
Venice, Genoa, York, St. Andrews, and New York. In horarjf 
questions, it denotes seas, great navigable rivers or canals, 
brooks, springs, wells, marshes, ditches, sedges, trenches, cis« 
terns, bathing or watering places, hydraulic machines, reser- 
voirs, sewers, &c. Being peculiar to the water, and aquatic 
experiments or purposes. 

: The ancients term this constellation unfortunate; yet this 
must be judged (as before said) by the leadinjg configurations, 
iq the borosco^. 

3teo» 

Leo is a hot, dry, burning, fiery, choleric, feral, furious, bru-^ 
tish, barren, quadrupedian, strong, eastern, masculine, northern^ 
diurn&l, and violent sign, of long ascension. The house of the^ 
Sun. The native bom under this sign is generally of a large 
body, broad shoulders, austere countenance, large eyes, dark 
yellow, or reddish hair, strong coarse voice, oval ruddy coun- 
tenance, of a high, resolute^ unbending, ambitious temper, yet 



ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. 06 

often generous, free> and courteous : the latter part of the sign 
is said to produce a weaker body, with lighter hair. It governs 
the heart and back ; and its diseases are pains in the back and 
ribSj syncopes, fevers, convulsions, pestilence, srnalUpox, mea- 
sles^ jaundice, and inflammations. It denotes accidents by fire, 
explosions, and combustible materials, and is wholly, barren. 
Its colours ar0 red and green. 

It rules over Italy, Bohemia, France, Sicily, Rome, Bristol, 
Bath, Taunton, and the west of England, Cremona, Prague, 
Syrficuse, Ravenna, and Philadelphia. In horary Astrology, it 
is found to be a symbol of wild beasts, furious animals, woods, 
forests, dens, deserts, rocky inaccessible places, castles, forts, 
parks, king's palaces, ovens, fire places, manufactories where 
large fires are kept, glass houses, distilleries, chymical labora- 
torieSf powder mills, and fire places in domestic apartments. It 
is generally deemed by Astrologers, to be h fortunate sign. 

Virgo is the sixth sign, comprising one half of the zodiac, a 
sign of long ascension, the house, exaltation and joy of Mer- 
cury ; a cold, dry, earthy, feminine, nocturnal, melancholy, 
barren, humane, commanding sign. Those born solely under 
the rule of this sign, are of middle stature, but rarely handsome, 
slender, but very compact, dark ruddy complexion, round face, 
dark brown hair, small shrill voice, and very ingenious, thrifty, 
and economical. It governs the abdomen, bowels, spleen, and 
diaphragm. Its diseases are all those which proceed from 
wind, melancholy, illiac passion, the dysentery, and all disor-. 
ders of the intestines. 

It governs all Turkey, both in Europe and Asia, Greece, 
Mesopotamia, Crete, Jerusalem, Croatia, Lower Silesia, Tou- 
louse, Paris, Lyons, Padua, &c. Its colour is black, speckled 
with blue. In horary questions, \idex\oie% studies, libraries, 
counting houses, book cases, closets, cabinets, concealed or pri- 
vate drawers, dairys, cornfields, granaries, hot houses, or nur- 
series, hay ricks, malt houses, breweries, and storehouses of all : 
sorts. It is generally reckoned unfortunate, nvXeBS other pow- 
erful aspects assist. 

E 



66 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

Libra is the sign of the autumnal equinox; a hot^ moist, 
airy, sanguine^ western, diurnal, cardinal, equinoctial, move- 
able, masculine, humane, obeying* sign, of long ascension in 
European climates. It is the house of Venus, and exaltation of 
Saturn. Under this sign, generally, the native is tall and well 
made, rather elegant in person, a round beautiful face, ruddy in 
youth, but very plain featured and inclined to eruptions, that 
disfigure the face when old, and consequently, in years, the re- 
verse of being handsome ; generally, the Libra person has blue 
eyes, and yellow or auburn hair. Authors state the disposition 
to be sweet, and the dealings and character just and upright ; 
but this depends almost wholly on the good aspects of the moon 
and mercury ,- for instance, t^ t&e moon or mercury is in aquare 
aspect to Jupiter, Saturn, or.MarSi although born under Libra, 
the native is usually dishonest, untrue, and far from virtuous, 
whether male or female. It is rather a fruitful sign. It governs 
the reins, loins, and all that region of the body, internal or 
external. Its diseases are weakness, debility, tabes dorsalis, 
syphilis, and imposthumes of various descriptions. 

It governs Austria, Alsace, Savoy, Portugal, Livonia, India, 
Ethiopia, Lisbon, Vienna, Frankfort, Fribourgh, Placentia, Ant- 
werp, and Charlestown. Its colour is black, or dusky crimson. 
In horary questions, it denotes detached barns, out houses and 
saw pits. In dwelling houses, the chambers of the luxurious, or 
the boudoir of the elegant ; also inner rooms, attic stories, and 
in the open air, windmills, mountain tops, sides of hills, chaces, 
forests, commons, downs, barren or stony ground, and places 
having a clear sharp air. The ancients deem it h fortunate sign. 

Scorpio is the house of Mars, and also his joy. It is termed 
a cold, moist, watery, phlegmatic, feminine, nocturnal, fixed, 
mute, southern, and extremely fruitful sign, of long ascension. 
It produces a strong, corpulent, robust, bony person, dark curl- 



ELEMENTARY PBlINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. ^7 

ing^ hair and eyes, middle stature, dusky complexion, coarse, but 
active ; generally, they are very reserved in their mode of 
speech. It governs the organs of getiercUion, and the groin, 
bladder, 8fc. Its diseases i^ confirmed laes> and the worst 
kind of syphilis, all secret and virulent diseases, fistulas, rup- 
tures, scurvy, and obstructions of the urethra, or intebtinai 
canal. When afflicted, it denotes great danger from poison, 
and excessive drinking. It is a very peculiar sign for deceit, 
fraud, and hypocrisy. 

It governs Judea, Mauritania, Catalonia, Norway, West Sile* 
sia. Upper Bavaria, Barbary, Morocco, Valentia, Messina, and 
Franckfort on the Oder. Its colour is brown. In horary- ques^ 
tions, it denotes receptacles for filth and vermin ; places where 
reptiles breed, sinks, sewers, drains, quagmires, bogs, marshes, 
pools, ruins near water, muddy swamps, gardens, orchards, 
vineyards, kitchens, larders, wine vaults, docks, canals, and 
such like places. It is by the ancients accounted unjbrtunate, 

Sagittarius is a hot> fiei^y, cholenc, dry, masculine, diurnal, 
eastern, common, bicorporeal, quadrupedian, chaogeable, sou- 
thern, obeying sign ; the house and joy of Jupiter, (and exalta- 
tion of the Dxagon's Tail.) The native born under this sign is 
well formed, genorally tall, or above the middle stature, ruddy 
complexion, handsome jovial looking countenance, oyal 4eshy 
face, fine clear eyes, chesnut eoioured hair ; they are generally 
Jolly fellows, " at either bin or board,'' active, intrepid, gener- 
ous, and obliging. The sign inclines to fruitfulness. It rules 
the thighs and os sacrum : its diseases are gout, rheumatism, 
fevers, falls, and a liability to broken bones. 

It reigns over Arabia-Felix, Spain, Hungary, ]\Ioravia, Li- 
guria, Narbone, Cologne, Avignop, ai^d Buda. Its colours are 
light green and olive. 

• In horary Astrology, it represents symbolically, stables for 
horses, barracks, army dep6ts, magazines, fire places, hills, high 
lands, and any rising place, or elevation ; as also " darts, spearSi 



B8 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

arrows/' ^uns, weapons of war, and military stores. It is a 
fortunate constellation. 

Capricorn is a qold, earthy, melancholy, arid, noctarnal, 
southern, obeying^, moveable, cardinal, quadrupedian, chang-e- 
able sign, the sign of the Winter tropic ; the hoase of Saturn, 
and exaltation of Mars. It is accounted barren : it produces a 
dry constitution, slender make, with a long thin visage, thin 
beard, dark hair, long neck, narrow chin and breast, and weak 
knees. In disposition crafty, thrifty, subtle, and saving, witty, 
but changeable, and very liable to melancholy and curious 
dreams. If Mercury is afflicted, they have much of enthusiasm 
in their disposition, and are sometimes determined myotics. The 
voice is generally weak and effeminate. 

It governs the knees and hams : and its diseases are sprains, 
dislocations, and broken limbs, melancholy, hysterics, cutaneous 
eruptions, and cold chills, with disorders of the chest and lungs. 
The regions subject to this sign are India, Macedonia, Thrace, 
and Greece, in general, Mexico, Saxony, Wilna, Mecklinburgh, 
Brandenburgh, and Oxford. Its colour, blacky or dark brown. 

In horary questions, it denotes houses for cattle, hot houses, 
places for lumber or old work, ship store-houses, arsenals, 
sheep-pens, fallow,.or barren fields, thorny bushy places, dung- 
hills, or places for soil, dark corners near the ground or thres- 
hold, covered jars or urns, mausoleums, church yards, sepulchres, 
vaults under churches, tombs, and obsciure or low houses : the 
ancients have classed it as unfortunate, 

AquarieS'iB a sanguine, atrial, hot, moist, masculine, diurnal, 
western, humane, rational, southern, obeying sign ; the house 
of Saturn. It is rather fruitful, producing a robust, sturdy, 
strong> healthy, middle statured person ; delicate or fair com- 
plexion, clear, but not pale ; sandy, or dark flaxen hair, hazle 
eyes, and generally an honest disposition. 



ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES OF THE SCIENCE. ^^ 

U governs the legs and ancles ; and its diseases are lameness^ 
fractures of limbs, the goat, cramp, rheumatism, and those pro- 
ceeding from foul blood. It reigns over Arabia, Petrea, Tar- 
tary, Russia, Denmark, Lower Sweden, Westphalia, Ham- 
burgh, and Bremen. Its colour is etherial blue. In horary 
questions^ it denotes, quarries of stone or marble, mines of 
precious metals, as well as of lead or copper, or any place re- 
cently dug up, uneven grounds, aerostatic machines, and aero- 
nautic experiments, or apparatus relating thereto ; also springs, 
conduits, roofs of houses, and deep wells : it is deemed ^fortu- 
nate sign. 

Pisces, the house of Jupiter, and exaltation of Venus, is a 
moist, cold, watery, phlegmatic, nocturnal, bicorporeal, effemi- 
nate, sickly, southern> obeying sign ; producing a short, pale, 
fleshy person, stooping, thickset, round shouldered^ and brown 
hair. It rules the feet and toes ; and its diseases are those of 
the feet, with cold, moist distempers. It is exceedingly fruitful,, 
and luxuriantly productive. 

It is said to govern Portugal, Spain, Egypt, Normandy, Ga- 
licia, Ratisbon, Calabria, &c. Its colour is white and glistening. 

In horary questions, it is symbolical of rivers, reservoirs of 
water, the sea, lakes, fountains, springs, marshy grounds, fish 
ponds, water mills, pumps, cisterns and wells ; also places 
where fluids of any kind are kept or sold. It is deemed 
unfortunate. 



70 A MANUAL OF ASTK0LO6T. 



THE 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES 



PECULIAR TO THE PLANETARY ORBS. 



** Can mortal strength presume to soar so high ! 
Can mortal ftigfat 'so oft t)edimm*d widi ttetiB 
Such glory bear ! for lo, the shadows fly 
Fr(>m hatUTc*8 face ; conftiiion disappears 
And order charoiS the ^e, and harmony the car f ' 

BtATTlE. 



Herschel, or (a^ some Astrologers term this planet) Uranus, 
having been so recetitly discovered, that no one living has seen 
more than one half his celestial revolution through the fields 
of space, it cannot be expected that a complete system of his 
Astrological effects could possibly be given ; but from the au- 
thor*s own experience, aided by what other observations he 
could gather from men of skill and science in celestial philo- 
sophy^ this planet is peculiarly unfortunate in his nature, and of 
course his influence, when brought into action by aspecting the 
various significators in a nativity, is replete with evil, also. He 
may be compared to the combined effects of Saturn and Mer- 
cury. He is in nature extremely frigid, cold, dry, and void of 
^ny cheering influence- 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF TMB PLANETS. 71 
" I«>t, HerKkct nlki hii flroalbr raund 
I'he bouDduj of Wndda ; vitb bia pde Moou 
Faint g^mmeting throngh the dukncM ni^l bu Ihcown, 
Deep dyed ud dead : o'a this chill globe foilam 
An endleu de«R, when exticine of cold 
'Etema! nU, H in hii satin aeat. 
On aiiitrj hills of neiei Ibawiog ice ; 
Such Uenehd'i e»rlh !" 

He wu diBGOveced on the 13th March 17SI, by the late Dr. 
Herschel, (ander sin8:alBrly ontiiaoui poaitions, which will be 
noticed in the Utter part of this work, where we treat of mun- 
dane Astrolog'y). His effects are truly malefic ; hut what he 
does of evil, is always in a pecaliarly strange, unaccountable, 
and totally unexpected manner: be causes the native born 
under his influence, to be of a very eccentric and original dis- 
position. Those persons are generally uaasually romantic, un- 
settled, addicted to change, and searchers after novelty. If the 
Moon or Mercury, and Herschel be well aspected, they are 
searchers after nature's secrets, excellent chymists, and usually 
profonnd in the more secret sciences. Ho gives the most ex- 
traordinary magnanimity and loftiness of mind, mixed with an 
nncontroUable and intense desire, for pursuits or discoveries otit 
of the " track of custom." 

In Marriage, if in the seventh house, or afflicting the Moon, 
he causes every thing bat happiness, want of order and socia- 
lity in domestic concerns, listlessness and coldness between 
man and wife, discord from the most entire, strange, and unu- 
sual causes, death of relatives, &c. He is equally evil in love, 
and peculiarly inimical to the fair sex : his ev" 
Hyleg have also a tendency to materially leaden 

As yet there are no peculiar hoases assigned I 
reason to tbink (from several thousand observ 
sign Aquarius, is one wherein he much delij 
fortunate in the airy trigon, Gemini, Libra, ani 
unforluTiale- in fiery, earthy, or watery signs, 
from the long period of his revolution) to b 



/2 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

thing like a syst^m^ as to the bodily coniirmation of those he 
governs ; but they may probably resemble those whom Saturn 
and Mercury are said to govern, if the student can judiciously 
combine the effects of each> which is difficult. Wheu we con- 
sider how much this planet must have baffled the judgment of 
the ancient Astrologers ; and when we reflect also^ that there 
may be other planets equally powerful, beyond his orbit, as yet 
undiscovered, we cannot help remarking the extreme ignorance 
and folly of those persons, who require from the Astrologer 
what they expect from no one else, infallihilUy, 

The anticipated existence,. and subsequent discovery of this 
planet, forms a singular instance on what correct principles the 
moderns have prosecuted their studies. Drs. Halley, Bradley, 
and others, had frequently observed that Satqrn was disturbed 
in his motion by some force, which they concluded must ori- 
ginate beyond its orbit ; as they could not account for it on the 
known principles of gravitation, they pursued the speculative 
theory, till at length the discovery of this hitherto unknown 
planet, crowned their labours with success^ and has enabled us 
to enlarge our present solar system to nearly double its bounds. 
Herschel shines with a fine bluish white light,* something be- 
tween that of Venus and the Moon, and usually appears only 
as a star of the eighth magnitude. 

m Saturn. 

Saturn is by universal experience acknowledged to be the 
most powerful, evil, and malignant of all the planets. In Na- 
tivities he is most destructive : if placed in the mid-heaven, he 
causes infinite tirouble in business, credit, and honor. The per- 
son is generally unfortunate in his principal undertakings ; and 
when Saturn arrives at the cusp of the angle by direction, is 
generally ruined. There is scarcely any aspect^ hQwever pow- 
erful, can counteract' this position. In the fourth house, he is 
not so evil, but «till unfortunate, and so of other places in the 
horoscope ; but it must always be observed in these cases, whe- 
ther Saturn is in aspect with other planets ; because if in good 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF THE PLANETS. 7^ 

aspect to Japiter/the evil is materially diminished, and even 
Venus assists herein most pow^fnlly. 

. Satam is of a dall, virhitish/ leaden colour ; he is considered a 
cold, dry, earthy, melancholy, masealine, malignant, solitary 
star. When the body and mind are formed by Saturn, authors 
describe the native as of middle stature, dark or pale com- 
plexion, small black leering' eyes, thick lips and nostrils, large 
ears, thin face, lowering looks, cloudy aspect, and seemingly 
melancholy and unhappy, broad shoulders, small legs, and thin 
beard. If well dignified by house, exaltation, or aspect, the 
native will be acute, active, and penetrating ; but austere, slow, 
and reserved, grave, elose, and ungenerous, covetous, laborious, 
patient, and mindful of injuries ; careful of what he gets, and 
constant both in attachment and hatred. The beams of Saturn 
and Herschel constitute the most decided Misers. 

If ill dignified, or ill aspected, (for either are the same) the 
native will be sordid, base*- cowardly and suspicious, envious, 
treacherous, malicious, and frowardly stubborn to a fault. The 
real nature of Saturn is repining and gloominess : persons under 
his immediate influence, generally see every thing through the 
worst possible, medium ; this generally breeds fear and mistrust. 
An old author observes, ". The Saturnine man vnll never look 
thee in the face." Another old author declares, that " if they 
take to love any one, they love most constantly ; and if they 
hate, they hate to the death." They are generally solitary, 
and fond of retirement from the busy ways of men, delighting 
in solemn spectacles, deep mysteries, mournful music, tolling 
of bells, and spectacles of horror ; as executions, and such like. 
If Saturn be much afflicted, they become a prey to the most 
gloomy misanthropy, and frequently commit suicide, especially 
if Venus join in the malignancy of the operating directions : 
this so true, that even at the present time, we have the epithet 
"Saiumine" as prefixed to one whose habits are gloomy and 
morose^ even by those who profess not to believe in Astrology. 
He is said to govern the bones, spleen, teeth, joints, and 
right ear, and those born under him are always said to have 
bad teeth, and to be very much afflicted with disorders of the 
teeth and gums, tooth-ache, &c ; he is also presumed to govern 



74 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOOT. 

the i«(eative faculties of* the mind, as the memory, &c. hi 
diseases, he denotes those which proceed from colds and ob- 
stractions^ as agues, melancholy, all nervous diseases, fits, epi- 
lepsy, black jaundice, cold humours and defloxions, fierce ca- 
tarrhs, pthisis, atrophy, fistula, leprosy, apoplexy, palsy, and 
dropsy. The ancient Astrologers record, that he is frienMy 
(according to natural sympathy and antipathy) with the O 1). 
and $ , and at enmity or disagreeing with ^ $ and the ]) . 

In horary questions, Saturn signifies {symbolically) sires, 
grandfathers, ancient men, day labourers, paupers, beggars, 
clowns, monks, husbandmen, the meaner sort of agriculturists, 
sextons, gprave diggers, &c. Of animals, &c, Saturn (accord- 
ing to the ancient Astrologers) rules the ass, cat, hare, mouse, 
mole, dog, wolf, bear, elephant, basilisk, crocodile, scorpion, 
serpent, adder, toad, hog, tortoise, eeU shell fish, and all crea- 
tures delighting in filth, and lu'eeding from putrefaction. 

Of herbs, trees, &c. He rules the hemlock, starwort, bears- 
foot, wolf-bane, fern, hellebore, henbane, burdock, dragon, 
parsnip, poppy, pulse, mandrake, vervain, aightsh^e, moss, an- 
gelica, box, borage, sage, spinach, cummin, fumitory, shep- 
herd's purse, horse tail, tam&risk, capers, polipody, senna, hemp, 
savin, rue, willow, pine, yew, and cypress tree. 

In the " fecUhered creation," are subt^ect toiiim, the crow, 
owl, crane, thrash, ostrioh, l^ipwing, peacock, bat, blad^bird, 
cuckoo, &c. 

Amongst stones afid minerals, he rules the sapphire, lapis 
lazuli, all unpolished black and bluiah stones, lead, the mag- 
net, and the dross of all metals. 

Of places, he delights in deserts, woods, obscure vallies, 
dens, caves, holes, sepulchres, church-yards, ruinous buildings, 
coal-pits, sinks, muddy dirty stinking places, wells and nui* 
sauces of every description. He delighteth in the eaal quarter 
of the heavens, and rules the east wind and cold weather, with 
frost or snow. His place in the Nativity is unfortunate to the 
native as long as he lives ; and, therefore, if it can be ascer- 
tained what part of the world he governs, when accounted 
from the Horoscope, the native should never travel in that 
direction^ 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF THE PLANETS. 7^ 

In a word, Saturn is the greater infortune, the worst of all 
the placets ; and were an Astrologer to forget himself so far, 
as to desire some serious evil might befal his enemies, or despi- 
sers, he could not express himself more effectually to the pur- 
pose, than by wishing his adversary exposed to the hostile rays 
of the sly, pernicious, and malignant old Saturn. 

'^^JupUer IB hot'&nd moist, temperate, modest, honest, adventurous, liberal, mer- 
ci5il, loving, and faithful ; i. e. giving these inclinations : and therefore those an- 
cient kings, beautified with these conditions, might be called thereafter Jupiter,** 

Raleigh's History of the World. 

» * . . • 

** Beyond the sphere of Mars, in distant skies, 
Revolves the mighty magnitude of Jove, 
With, kingly state, the rival of the Sun. 
About him round, four planetary Moons, 
On earth irith wonder, aU night long beheld. 
Moon above Moon, his fair attendants dance." 

Jupiter is the brightest of all the planets, except Venus, 
which on some occasions, exceeds him in splendor. He is 
considered the largest, and next to Saturn, the most powerful 
planet in the system. He is found to be a planet in nature hot 
and moisty sanguine and diurnal, the author next under divine 
providence, of every earthly good, and '' every perfect gift ;" 
as also of temperance, justice, moderation and fortitude. He 
is equally as powerful in good, as Saturn was before described 
to be in evil ; the cause of riches, honors, and the greatest 
success in life. When a native is born under his influence, he 
will be tall and fair, handsome, portly, erect, and free in his 
carriage, robust, ruddy, oval face, high forehead, full grey or 
light. eyes, soft thick brown hair, wide chest, long feet ; alto- 
gether what is termed " a good looking person,'^ noble appear- 
ance, and gracious aspect, commanding and dignified whether 
male or female. If Jupiter be fortified by dignities or aspects 
at birth, the native will be wise, just, good, affable, magnani- 



76 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

mous, mild and temperate in manners, moderate and moral, or 
relig^ious. If ill dignified or ill fortified and afflicted, by aspects 
of Satarn, Mars, or Herschel, be will be a squanderer of his 
wealth, a prodigal, reckless of shame, of shallow abilities, easily 
led astray by fools, a bigot in religion, and a great epicnre, or 
given to intoxication, lazury^ immoderately lascivious and lust- 
ful, and honest only in appearances ; yet even then, he will be 
esteemed as a " hairbrained boon companion,'' giving up to 
every ones humour, never given to quarrels, but bearing injuries 
without much repining, and a general, but not a firm friend. 

The reed nature of Jupiter is freedom, confidence, generosity, 
frankness, benevolence, charity, good will, and nobleness of 
disposition, being the exact reverse of the mistrust and cunning 
of Saturn. Persons born under his favourable influences, are 
useful and happy members of society, and almost universally 
beloved. 

This planet rules the lungs, blood, and internal viscera ; his 

diseases are those which are either seated in those parts, or 

which arise from a plethoric habit and corrupt blood. He is 

friendly by sympathy to T^ Q $ and the ]) . He has but one 

enemy, which is (J . 

In horary questions, Jupiter represents, when strong, judges, 
councellors, all ecclesiastical persons, from the archbishop to 
the curate^ chancellors, barristers, and the higher order of law- 
yers, scholars and students, clothiers, woollen drapers, &c. 
When weak, he denotes mountebanks, quacks, empirics, knaves, 
cheats, drunkards, and the meanest, either in the law or the 
church. 

Of animals, &c. he rules the sheep, unicorn, doe> hart, stag, 
ox, elephant, beasts of every kind beneficial to mankind ; also, 
the whale, serpent, dolphin, &c. ; and of birds, the peacock, 
pheasant, partridge, dove, snipe, stork, lark, bees, &c. ; and 
generous creatures of most descriptions. 

In the vegetable world, the ancients attributed to Jupiter the 
gilly-flower, nutmegs, sugar, mace, cloves, strawberries, flax, 
betony, balm, fumitory, wallwort, wild marjoram, sweet mar- 
joram, organy, pimpernel, rhubarb, allheal, wheat, basil, bug- 
loss, borage, St: John's wort, piony, liquorice, violets, pome- 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF THE PLANETS. 77 

.^lanates, mint, mastic, saffVoiij daisy, and featherfew ; also the 
almond tree, hazel, fig tree, olive.oak, cherry tree, ash, goose- 
.berry, pine tree, coral tree, pear tree, birch tree, ivy, vine, and 
mulberry. 

Of stxmea, &c. the topaz, amethyst, marble, emerald, chrys- 
tal, sapphire, hyacinth, bezoar, freestone, &c. ; and of metaU, 
tin and pewter. 

Of plctcee^ he denotes churches, oratorios, palaces, gardens, 
synods, or courts of justice, wardrobes, and magnificent abodes, 
-or neat and curious places. He delighteth in the north quarter 
of. the heavens, 933d cajoses north and north east winds, with 
.pleasant, bi^aUii^> ^r0P^ and temperate weather. 



^. ' 



*' Mars, the fierce god of war, 
Of discord dire ; and slaughter — 
Bellona's aid, the scourge of providence ; 
Liord of the fiery steed, and armed car ; 
Hasting to death, to desolation fell ! 
Pompous and proud, and in his hour of glory, 
Where death shafts thicken— where life's crimson stream, 
Ebbs fastest !'' 

COKOREVE. 

Mars, the next planet in order to Jupiter, is of a peculiar 
colour,appearing like a bright flame or spark in the heavens, 
especially when in Perigee, and thus readily distinguished from 
other stars. He is a hot, dry, fiery, choleric, nocturnal, malig- 
nant, and violent planet, the Astrological cause of anger, quar- 
rels^ contentiorn, violence, war, slaughter and bloodshed. In 
other respects far from fortunate, but not so evil as Saturn, as 
his influence is by no means so lasting ; in which respect, the 
influence of Saturn may be compared to a lingering but fatal 
consumption; and that of Mars to a, burning fever, slakeing 
its thirst in the life blood of the patient. He denotes a strong 
well set, but short body, bony, lean, muscular, and strong red, 
or ruddy complexion, sharp hazle eyes, light, or red hair, and a 



7S A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

rough Tiolent eonoteoaDce, furrowed by sig^nificant lines : when 
he is fortunate by aspect with the leadiogf sig^ificators, and 
well dignified, he b said to prodoee a fearless, violent, irascible, 
and nnsabmitting- person, natorally delighting' in war, battle, or 
contention, bat in other respects pradent, rational, and even 
generoos or magnanimous. If unforiunaie in eonfigontions 
and ill dignified, the native is wholly destitute of any virtue, 
prone to violence, quarrels, treacheiy, robbery, murder, treason, 
and every species of cruelty and wickedness. The real nature 
of Mars is anger, and an eager wish to be in quarrels and mis- 
chief of all sorts ; the countenance of those bom under his in- 
fluence, appears to be extremely vicious and unbending, rude, 
unkind, and ferocious. — It may be truly said of them, that " the 
bitterness of their wrath is cruel/' They expect and exact 
universal submission ; and although often magnanimous, they 
are seldom kind or sociable. Such evil dispositions, however, 
are seldom seen, (except in the cruelties of a Nero, or an AH 
Pacha ; and in a few such instances, where the same cruel fate 
they bad brought on others, generally overtakes themselves) 
as the aspects of other planets alter it materially : but in low 
life, the gallows generally ends the career of the " ill starred" 
child of Mar?. 

Mara is said by the ancients to govern the gall, left ear, 
head, face, smell, imagination, reins, genitals, ^c ; and the 
diseases |>ecaliar to this planet, are the small pox, jaundice, 
fevers, measles, hot eruptions, carbuncles, diabetes, strangury, 
burns, scalds, wounds and bruises, with all inflammatory dis- 
eases. He is friendly, sympathetically, with 1? V © ? and 
^ , and has no enemy but the ]) . 

In horaxy questions, he denotes symbolically, generals and 
commanders of armies, soldiers, military men, surgeons, chy- 
mists, physicians, apothecaries, druggists, armourers, watch 
makers, barbers, all such as use implements of a sharp nature, 
all trades wherein Are is used; also curriers, smiths, carpenters, 
bricklayers, sculptors, cooks, taylors, bakers, &c. When ill 
placed, he denotes thioves, highwaymen, hangmen, jailors, and 
" all cut throat people." An old author likewise observes, 
" 1 have still observed, that a right martialist doth seldom ex- 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF THE PLANETS. 79 

eeed in height, or to be* at the most above a yard aad a half 
high !'• 

Of animcUs, &e. Mars denotes the mastiff, wolf, tiger, pan- 
ther, and all such beasts as are ravenoas and bold ; also the 
shark, pike, barbel, fork fish, all stinging water serpents, and 
hurtful fish. Of ^rds, the hawk, kite, raven, vulture, owl, 
cormorant, crow, magpie, and all ravenous birds of prey. 

In the vegetable yfOT]6, he rules all such herbs that are Ao^ 
and dry, or have sharp pointed leaves, or that are red, and usu- 
ally in barren high stony places, as the thistle, brambles, briars, 
nettles, onions, lingwort, radish, mustard seed, ginger, pepper, 
garlick, hemlock, horehound, tamarinds, &c ; and all trees 
that are thorny or prickly. 

In the minertd world, he governs blood stone, load stone, 
jasper, touch stone, asbestos, amethyst, and the adamant ; also 
iron, steel, arsenic, antimony, brimstone, and pungent minertis, 
of a fiery or inflammable nature ; (likewise the different inflam- 
mable gases, as a judicious modern Astrologer has observed.) 

Of places, he denotes all those that are appertaining to fire 
or blood, as laboratories, furnaces, distilleries, bake houses, 
ovens, smiths or cutlers, butchers shops, and such like. He 
delights in the Wesiem quarter of the heavens, and causes 
western winds, with thunder, lightning, fiery meteors, and a 
dry pestilential air. 

" Hither as to their fountain other stars 
Repairing, in their golden urns draw light, 
J^nd hence the morning planet gilds her horns. 
B7 his magnetic beam he gently warms 
The universe, and to eadi inward part, 
With gentle penetration, though unseen, 
Shoots genial virtue even to the deep !'* 

Milton. 

The Sun is the centre of our system, although in ancient 
times men deceived by appearances, supposed him in common 



80 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

with the other planets to revolve round the earth : this opinion 
of Ptolemy although incorrect, according to Astronomical prin- 
ciples^ does not in the remotest degree affect the system of As- 
trology which the ancients founded ; for the stars act universally 
upon the earth and its inhabitants, according to their geocen- 
tric or apparent position, without any regard to their true or 
heliocentric places. He is considered as temperately hot and 
dry, of his own nature scarcely good or evil, but a most pow- 
erful source of ill fortune where aflBicted by the other planets, 
and placed in his debilities, or signs contraiy to his nature ; as 
on the contrary, when strongly aspected or placed in a geneth- 
liacal scheme, in signs of dignity, which are those of his own 
nature, he is the source of much prosperity. The Sun is the 
natural aignificator of credit, honour, and dignity or respectabi- 
lity in life in every horoscope, and although he by no means mo- 
nopolises the supreme or chief signification herein, (as some 
writers have for lack of proper experience simply imagined) yet 
it is most assuredly of the utmost consequence in every nativi' 
ty, that the sun shpuld be strong and unafl9icted, both accord- 
ing to the nature of the sign he occupies, and his different fa- 
miliarities with adjuvant or hurtful stars. Some writers imagine 
that Planets near the Sun, are rendered thereby, weak and 
unfortunate ; this is, as far as the authors experience leads him 
to judge, by no means the case, unless other causes should give 
testimony thereto : indeed it is quite evident that many planets 
within 60 zodiacal degrees of the Sun, are typical of an emi- 
nent name ; and when in opposition to that luminary, the re- 
verse, and peculiarly unfortunate, although this requires some 
qualification, for should the satellitium of stars near the Sun, be 
themselves weak, malignant by nature, or afQicted by aspect, 
public notoriety in infamy alone, would ensue. In these, as in 
all other cases, the student must well examine the different tes- 
timonies, and carefully (not hastily) form his judgment thereon, 
by which means he will doubtless be enabled to read the hea- 
vens with far more exactness, than the greater part of those 
who affect to disbelieve Astrology, can read their primer ! And 
when once the real first principles of this sublime science are 
gained, and thoroughly understood, the rest will be compara- 



CELESTIAX IKFLUENCKS OF THE PLANETS. 81 

Uvely fa4nle and easy ; aitfaoogh al fifst sight they may be con* 
sideted by the casoal reader, as intricate and abatniae, which it 
the case with every mathematical science, under the heavens. 
Indeed it may well be expected that a science which dives so 
deep miofiiiuriip, and which approaches above all others so 
Dear to eelestial taisdmn, should be somewhat more than others, 
Hbstnise in the elements thereof; but thrt>ug-h the manifold 
experience^ and the united indefatigable labors of the " philo- 
sophic wise and great in aU ages/' the Autk(Mr can safely af- 
irm that the art may be attained even in a far shorter time than 
the common routine of mathematics, or even than the know* 
ledge of the etMumed science of Phrenology, whi^ is by no 
means to be compared with AstrBlogieal learning. 
. From this digression, which we thought prop^to make, in 
order to guard the student from being astounded at the (appa* 
rently lengthened) descriptions of the heavenly bodies, which, 
like the quantities of algebras, or the first rules of arithmetic, 
are essential to be well remembered as the primwn mMle of 
the art.— We hasten to describe the description of person the 
Sun gives^ when principal significator, viz. a large bony ath- 
letic strong body, broad high forehead, light sandy curling 
hair, quick piercing eye, and well made person, but one who 
will soon become bald. If well dignified or favourably aspect* 
ed, the disposition is noble, magnanimous, proud and lofty, but 
humane ; a faithful friend, and a generous enemy, scorning to uso 
advantages which maybe g^ven him over his opponents; gene* 
rally of few words^ but very pompous and magnificent ; fond of 
dress, ornaments, and decorations of all sort8> extremely partial 
to costly jewels, and splendid attire. 

« I fill dignified^ and ill aspected, the native is both proud and 
roean^ arrogant and submissive, a tyrant, and yet a'sycophant^ 
empty, vain, a great talker, restless, vain boasting, uncharitable, 
despotical, unfeeling, and always seeking to serve himself be* 
fore his friends, rarely generous ; but on the whole particularly 
unamiable, and generally disliked on account of his arroganeo 
and ignorant pomposity. 

' The Sun is most materially altered in nataral signification ab« 
eordlng to Xhe^sign he occupies^ which experience leads tha 

F 



82 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

author most poiitively to affirm (notwithttandiiig late writen 
have affirmed the eontraiy) ; thus in the watery signs ^ vt and 
K / he is not by far so fortunate as in t Q / » or even in ^ or 
H . Tbis« the student will bear in mind. 

He is said by the ancients to goyern the heart, back, arieriea^ 
right eye of a man, and left eye of a woman ; as also to preside 
over the retentive faculty, or memory. His diseases, are 
faintings, palpitation of the heart, weak sight, fever, disordered 
brain, craifip# foul breath, catarrhs, defluxions, disorders of the 
mouth, throat, &c. He is by sympathy friendly to all the Pla- 
nets except ^2 • 

In hwrary Astrology he denotes, when well placed, kings, 
emperors, mpnarchs, princes, dukes, marquisses, and indeed all 
noble and high bom people, and in general all '' of gentle 
blood," persons in high offices, or superiority in city, town, or 
pountry, coinersi goldsmiths, workers in gold or silver, and 
costly lapidi^ries or jewellers. When ill dignified and afflicted 
by aspect, he signifies all persons in usurped authority. An 
old author writes '' the Sun is under Mars, placed in the nudst 
of all the planets, being the chief light and president of them 
all, sitting as a judge or king, amongst his nobles ; wherefore 
some of the ancients have ascribed to him chief rule, and made 
him as it were, an emperor amongst the stars/' 

Of the brute and feathered creation, he rules all such beasts 
as are stately^ furious, bold, strong, and invincible, as the lion, 
wolf, ram, boar, bull, horse, &c., as well as the phcBnix, swan, 
cock, hawk, nightingale, lark, &c ; and of fishes, the sea-calf, 
shell-fish, star-fish, and the prodigies of the vast and mighty 
ocean. In the vegetable world, he rules saffron, peony, marygold> 
palm, ginger, dittany, celandine, vervain, amber, rosemary, St. 
John's wort, musk, rosasolis, cinnamon, eye bright, cinquefoil> 
lignum aloes, lavender, sweet marjoram, pepper, honey, frank- 
incense and all aromatic herbs. In minerals, &c. he rules 
gold, and costly jewels, etites, the carbuncle, chrysolite, iris, 
heliotropion, jacinth, pyrophilus, topas, ruby and diamond. 

Oi places, he denotes princes palaces, magnificent buildings^ 
dining rooms, towers, splendid apartments, and costly houses. 
He causes Eastern winds, and delights in the Eastern part of 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF THE PLANETS. S3 

the heavens. His celestial path is always in the ecliptic, and 
•he never has any latitude^ in which respect he differs from 
every other planet in the heavens ; even as in his splendor he 
Is more beauteous than the fairest of the " wandering' orbs/' 

** Hail, amiable vision ! every eye 
Looks up and loves tliee I every tongue proclaims 
'Tis pleasant to behold thee !*' 

• Venus is the next in order to the central Sun, a beauteous and 
^ brilliant planet, she is the only planet mentioned by the most 
ancient poets, -as Homer and Hesiod. Her Astrological charac- 
ter $ , which to the present day is maintained by the Astrono« 
mers ; is supposed to be " a rude representation of a female fi- 
gure with a trailing or flowing robe/* She is in poetry per- 
sonified as the patron and friend of the softer passions ; an old 
Astrolc^r writes, '* Venus, fair Venus, is the queen of love." 
The author of Waverley views her effects in the same poetical 
light in his celebrated novel of " Guy Mannering : 

^* Love*s world, his home, his birth-place ; 



Delightfully dwells he 'mong fays and talismans, 
And spirits, and delightedly believes 
Divinities, being himself divine. 
The intelligible forms of ancient poets, 
The ftiir humanities of old religion. 
The power, the beauty, and the majesty. 
That had their haunts in dale or piny mountains. 
Or forest by slow stream, or pebble spring, 
Or chasms and watery depths. All these have vanish^ ; 
But stiU the heart doth need a language, still 
Doth the old instinct bring back the old names ; 
And to yon starry world they nmv are gone^ 
Spirits or Gods, that used to share this e^rth . 
With man as with their friend and to the lover 
Yonder they move, from yonder visible sk'y 
Shoot influence down ; and even at this day 
'Tis J«//i7er brings whate'er is great, 
. And Venus who bi-itigs every thing that*s/air,*^ 



84 . A MANUAL OF ASTRaLOGY. 

Venus shines with a beautifjul clear pellucid light, aufficienteven 
at times to cast ai sensible shadow. Placidus, a celebrated As- 
trologer of former times, thinks her ". bluish lustre denotes 
heat ;*' at which rate this planet must be warmer than Jupiter* 
She is a feminine, nocturnal, temperate planet, and considered 
as next to Jupiter in benevolent influence : her beautiful bright- 
ness may w&ll denote an auspicious star, which she certainly is, 
and those who have the happy fortune to be born with this 
planet in the superior angles, are without fail noted for eminence 
in the polite annals, or^£(cientigc ^s of the day ; leaving a last- 
ing name to posterity, as well as being the general favorites off 
the foirer sex : and addicted to poetry, song, and music. Our 
present beloved monarch, and mo9t gracious majesty, GEOiiGif 
i V. was born just as the befievolent '' star of Venus*' arose in 
the horifson, or Eastern angle, terined by Astrologers the as- 
cendant or " House of life,'' and prime significator of manners ; 
now it is well known to all Europe what a refined and polished 
genius, and what exquisite taste, the King of England posses- 
ses, which, therefore may be cited as a most illiLStrious proof of 
the celestial science ; a 'proof likewise which is palpably de- 
monstrable, even to the most casual observer, since the time 
of his nativity is taken from the public journals of the period ; 
and cannot be gainaayed.' 

'* Fair Venus shines 
Even in the eye of day ; with sweetest beans 
Propitiou* shines, and shakes a trembling flood 
Of softened radiance from her dewy locks 
Fair' morning Star, 
That leads on dawning day." 

Barsauld. 

If well dignified, well placed, or well aspected, either are 
the same, but the two latter the best ; the temper is even, quiet, 
placid, and unusually graceful; engaging, sweet, merry and 
cheerful; amateurs in music, drawing, and accomplishments, 
out of the ordinary way. But if Venus be afflicted the native 
bom under her immediate influence, is lewd, profligate, shame- 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OF THE PLANETS. 85 

less, and lascivious : she denotes a peculiarly handsome coofor- 
matioh of body, geb^mlly very beautiful sparkling* hazle or 
black eyes, round smooth foce, light or chesnut hair, dimples in 
the cheek or chin> an amorous look, biit sweet voice. An old 
author says, " having a Un^e dimple in the chin, a lovely mouth, 
cherry lips, and a right m&rry countlBnanoe ;" in short the real 
nature of Venus (Astrological ty speaking) is mildness and good- 
ness, and those under her influence are generally the most ac- 
complished in the haui^ion, or sphere of fashion ; and votaries 
of the song, the dance, and music's enchanting fascinations — 
They are usually merry, " even to a fault." 

Venus is said (by the old authors on the sideral art) to rule 
the reins, spine, generative system, the neck, throat and hr easts ; 
her diseases are those of the back, loins, and of the aforesaid 
parts ; as also priapism, syphilis, heartburn, and secret fashion- 
able diseases, or disorders peculiar to luxury and free living. 
She is by sympathy found to be friendly to every planet except 
the leaden star of T^ • 

In the horary system of stellar science, Venus denotes musi- 
cians, embroiderers, perfumers, artists, painters, classic model- 
lers or sculptors, dealers in the dresses or ornaments of the rich 
and wealthy, and all who work in elegant attire, or administer 
to the luxuries of the great, when strong and well dignified ; 
but when weak in th^se respects, she represents gamesters, and 
the lower orders of the votaries of pleasure and voluptuoui^nes^. 

Venu^ rules all such animals ais are amorous in nature, and 
also the dog, sheep, goat, bull, calf, panther, and hairt : amongst 
birds, fhe swan, kingfisher^ Swallow, pelican, pigeon, sparrow, 
tuirtle dove, st6ck dove, «fti^w, eagle, partridge, thrush, black- 
bird, pye, wi»eri, &c; ; and alnoiigst ^^e^i the pilchard, crab, 
lobsteV, whiting, salmon, and dolphin. In the vegetable crea- 
tion, there are 'Subject to her influence, all such plants as are 
odoriferous, pleasant, sweet, and delectable, as satyriou, daffodil, 
maiden-hair, the violet, valerian, vervain, thyme roots, the rose, 
lilly, &c., with every kind of fragrant spice : arid of trees, the 
fig tree ; cypfress, pomegranate, apple tree, pear tree, myrtle, 
walnut, and almond tree, peaches, apricots, raisins, vines, ash 
tree, and all delightful perfumes, as ambergrease, musk, civet, 
and fragrant gums of all kinds. 



86 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

AmoDgfst the mineral creation, she rules the beryl, chrysolite* 
emerald, sapphire, green jasper, coral, alabaster, and marble \ 
also copper, brass, and their different ores. Of places, she de- 
notes beds and bed-chambers, dancing and dining rooms, gard ens, 
fountains, wardrobes, banqueting houses> theatres, &c. She is 
said to delight in the South, and to rule the South wind ; de- 
noting gentle showers in winter, and temperate heat in summer, 

" Wc, tho* from heaven remote, to heaten will move 
With strength of mind, and tread the abyss above ; 
And penetrate with an interior light, 
Those upper depths which nature hid from sight. 
Fleas'd will we be to walk along the sphere 
Of shining stars, and travel with the year 
To leave this heavy earth, and scale the height 
Of Atlas, who supports the heavenly weight : 
• To look from azure clouds, and thence survey 
Mistake mortals wandering from the way.** 

OVIO'8 MCTAMOBPHOSISk 

The planet Mercury is the smallest of all the primary pla-^ 
nets, and moves the quickest in his celestial orbit ; he is so near 
the central sun, as rarely to be seen ; except a little before 
sun-rise in the morning, and a little after sun-set in the even- 
ing ; but even then, his motion is so rapid towards the sun, that 
he can only be discerned for a short space of time. When ob- 
served through a telescope, he appears of a bright white glis- 
tening color, but to the naked eye he appears more of a dull 
leaden color : the ancient Grecian Astrologers, (in their un- 
rivalled classical delineations of both celestial and terrestrial 
objects) assigned to this planet the celestial oflSce of being " the 
swift messenger of the Gods," and represented him by the fi- 
gure of " a youth with wings at his head and feet," whence 
the character $ , is symbolically derived* The singular cir- 
cumstance of Mercury forming so conspicuous a feature in the 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OP THE PLANETS. B? 

doctrines of judicial Astrolog^y, (since he is said to role the 
whole of the rational and intellectoal faculties), is perhaps a 
stronger proof of the verity of this art than could well be ima- 
gined ; for were those precepts and judgments, " founded on 
whim and fancy" (as some say), the ancients never would have 
constituted an almost invisible planet, as the chief ruler of the 
mental powers t but would doubtless have chosen some other 
more visible and ponderous star, for that important office. The 
student, and judicious reader will be probably led to notice this 
remarkable fact, in the course of perusing our writings, on si- 
deral subjects, a fact which to the unprejudiced enquirer is 
worth more than an hundred syllogistical arguments, pro and 
con, on the matter in hand. 

Mercury is the Astrological source of wit, ingenuity, inven- 
tion, discovery, and eminent skill in science, art, and almost 
every important branch of human knowledge. He is consi* 
dered as a cold, dry, earthy, melancholy star ; when well dig- 
nified or free from hostile aspects of afflicting stars, the mind is 
strong, vigorous, active, *' searching and exhausting both 
worlds, and imagining new;" the memory retentive, tenacious, 
inheriting a natural thirst for knowledge, which all the wells 
of discovered science cannot slake, but still does the intellectual 
soal wish, " ardent and aspiring," for store after store of philo- 
sophic, classic, or celestial learning : generally the most elo- 
quent orators, the most skilful philosophers, the most eminent 
mathematicians, and the most rare and curious of mankind are 
under his '' selectest influence */^ no one can become distin- 
guished or eminent in life, for real abilities, unless Mercury in 
their horoscope be free from evil configurations. 

George Bidder, the calculating youth, whose nativity the 
reader may see in ** the Astrologer of the nineteenth century," was 
born decidedly under the auspicious influence of $ , having the 
sign Gemini, for his horoscope, with Mercury therein, in zo- 
diacal parallel to the Moon, which not only confirms what is 
before laid down, but (as there can be no evasion as to the time 
of his birth being correct) proves the theory of the ancients to 
be unquestionable ; but when Mercury is afflicted oi: ill dtgni*- 
fied by aspect, configuration, or discordancy of sign, the native 



S8 A. MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

will be a mean, shuffliDgr, unprincipled character^ a voucher dC 
falsehoods, and void of real understanding** % 

The real Mercurial person is of a tall, uprigrht, spare body, 
long nose, dark eyes^ longp yisage, dark hair, long slender hands 
and fiilgers, which last is a peculiar mark of Mercury* The 
color varies as he is aspeeted by other Stars, . but generally he 
is any thing but of fair complexion, and often quite dark co- 
lored, or very sallow. He governs the brain, tongue, hand^, 
and feet ; his diseases are madness, apoplexy, vertigo, head- 
aches, stammering, dumbness, stoppage or humour in the head, 
coughs, and rheumatic or goaty disorders. His enemies are 
^ @ and D , his friends % $ and Tj ; yet some write him as 
friendly to all hut ^ . 

In the queBtionary art he denotes, when well placed. Astro- 
logers, philosophers, mathematicians, secretaries) officers of 
state, merchants, travellers, sculptors, poets, lawyers, teachers, 
orators, ambassadors, commissioners, artificers, and all inge<* 
nious clever persons. When weak, he represents scriveners, 
clerks, pettifoggers, vile persons, cunning in acting mischief^ 
thieves, carriers, messengers, footmen, servants, &c. 

Of heast%f he rules all such as are of quick senses ingenious, 
inconstant, and swift ; also such as are easily taught by man, as 
the dog, ape, fox, weasle, hart, mule, hare, civet cat, squirrels^ 
the hysena, spider, &c. ; and of Jinked, the mullet, and all swift 
reptiles ; likewise of birds, all those that are naturally witty 
and inconstant, as the nightingale, linnet, ibis, blackbird^ 
thrush, parrot, swallow, jay, crane, cockatoo, the lark, and the 
jackdaw. Of herbs and plants, he. rules cinquefoil, marjoram, 
fumitory, pimpernel, parsley, and such '' as are of divers colors, 
and mixed natures," or those which in medicine have chief re- 
lation to the brain knd tongue, or which remove obstructions; 
and comfort the spirits, as adders tongue, lungwort, dragon- 
wort, vervain, hiera, diambra, &c. Of trees, the walnut, filbert, 
and hazel, &c. 

In the mineral creation, he rules quicksilver, tin, marchasite, 
setates, red nitrble, topaz, millstone, granite, and all stones of 
spotted c(rfours. 
. Ofj?laces, Mercury represents symbolical ly academies, schools^ 



CELESTIAL INFLUENCES OP THE PLANETS. 89 

coiiattion halls, or.piiblic convened assemblies, places where 
lively games are held, as tennis and racket courts, fairs, ordina- 
ries, raatkets^, ho^lingprgvi^ns, the hall, stady, libraries, count- 
ings houses, pulpits, &c. He delig-hteth in the northern quarter 
of the heavens, and his influence over the weather is usually 
according to the applying pTanet, to whose aspect he is has- 
tening. 

'* The wind had ariaen^ and ^wepi before it the douds which had formerly ob* 
scared the sky. The ilfoon wtu high and at fuU, and aU the lesser satellites of 
heaven dKme forth in doadlen effulgence. The scene which their light pre- 
sented to mBQaering, wai in ihe highest degree unexpected and striking." 

Guy Maniitrifigy chap iii. . 



(< 



Now beamed ^bc evening star, 



And from embattled douds emerging slow, 

Cynthia came, riding on her sUver car. 

And azure mountain cliffs shone faintly from afar.*' 

Beattie. 

> 

Cynthia, " the queen of heaven," as the ancients termed 
her. Off the MooN, the companion of the earth, and chief source 
of our evening light, is a cold, moist, watery, phlegmatic pla- 
net, variable to an extreme, in Astrological science, and par- 
taking of good or evil, as she is aspected by good or evil stars. 
When angular and linafflicted in a nativity, she is the promis- 
sary pledge of great success in life, and continual good fortune. 
She produces a full stature, fair pale complexion, round face, 
grey eyes, short arms, thick hands and feet, smooth, corpulent, 
and phlegtoatic body. Blemishes in the eyes, or a peculiar 
weakness in the sight, is the result of her being afflicted by the 
Sun. Her conjunction, semisextile, sextile, or trine; to Jupiter, 
is exceedingly fortunate ; and she is said by the old Astrolo- 
gers, to govern the brain, stomach, bowels, left eye of the male, 
and right, eye of the female. Her usual diseases are rheuma- 



00 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 

tism, consumption, psXuy, cholic, apoplexy, vertigfo, lunacy, 
scropliula, smaU pox, dropsy, &c. ; also, most diseases peculiar 
to young: children. Her enemies are T; &°^ i ; ^^ friends. 

In the horary circle of questionary science, she represents 
sailors, navigators, persons employed in the common or ordi- 
nary offices of men, as inferiors, servants, &c. ; also all persons 
connected v^ith the aquatic element, and any kind of fluid. If 
well dignified, or well placed, the most respectable in these 
occupations ; if ill clignified, the reverse. 

Of hectsta, she denotes all such as delight in or near the wa- 
tery element, as the otter, all amphibious animals, fishes in ge- 
neral ; also the chameleon, hog, frog, cat, mice, rats, &c. All 
shell fiah are said to be more peculiarly under her influence. Of 
hird4, she rules the goose, swan, duck, dobchick, moor hen, 
night owl, night raven, and all birds that delight in watery 
aliments, or love to float on the fluid element. Of herbs and 
plants, she rules sea weed, lunaria, hyssop, rosemary, agnus 
castus, pompion, melon, gourd, cucumber, colewort, cabbage, 
endive, mushrooms, poppy, linseed, rapeseed, and all such herbs 
which are said to follow the course of the moon, in her increase 
and decrease. Of trees, she rules the palm tree, (which the 
ancients say " send forth a twig every time the moon rises,'') 
and all plants, trees, and herbs, juicy and full of sap. 

In the mineral kingdom, the ancients attribute to the moon 
silver and silver ore; all stones that are white and green, as 
the crystal, selenite, pearl, &c. ; and of places, she represents 
the sea, the ocean, large lakes or bodies of water, fountains, 
fields near the sea, sea ports, rivers, pools, fish ponds, brooks, 
bogs, docks, springs, common sewers, wharfs, &c« She pn>- 
duces such weather as her various aspects with the other stars 
would naturally show, having of her own simple nature but 
small influence either way, over the electric fluid of the atnios^ 
phere. 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OF HEAVEN. 



91 



A DIAGRAM 



OF THE 



C^elV^e WoMt& 0t f^ea)ien 




AN EXPLANATION OF THE ABOVE DIAGRAM. 

In order to illustrate plainly to the reader what Astrologers 
mean by the "Houses of Heaven/' it is proper for him to bear 



92 A MAN-UAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

ia mind, that, there are f(mr cardinal points in the mundane 
circle of the earth, rodncl her owA axis, which is not only de- 
monstrable to reason, but known to every one ; these are, the 
exact line wherein the Sun (speaking according- to the course 
of Qustom) riaes in the morning, where he cornea to the meri' 
dian or mid-day, where he seta in the evening of the same day, 
and where he toiiieh to the Nndfr, twelve!)' clock, or midnight 
line, the firat of these, that is, the line (or imaginary line) 
which is level with the horizon when the aun riaea, is the As- 
trologer's Jirat houae, or first grand angle, termed the Horos- 
cope or ascendant. The second point, or the degree, when he 
is ai his highest altitude, which invariably is in every latitude 
at noon-day, is the Astrologer's tenth houae, or mid-heaven, 
and most powerful angle, or house of honor. Pursuing the 
same Course, the apparent line level with the horizon, when 
the aun aeta, constitutes the aeventh houae in the sidereal 
art, being the third grand angle, and setting horizon or de- 
scendant. Again, at midnight, the Sun arrives to the cuap or 
line of the lower heaven, or nadir, or as Astrologers term it, 
the Imum Coeli and fourth houae. These four cardinal points, 
as before observed, all men are sensibly aware of, and the most 
inveterate critic that may he fated to lash our present system, 
will, we presume, allow us in this instance to hold our propo- 
sition undisputed ; since, although we cannot in the " etherial 
blue" discern these said lines or terminating divisions, both 
reason and experience (leaving mathematical science out of the 
question) assure us that they certainly exist; therefore the 
Astrologer has certain grounds for the choice of his four an-, 
gular houaea, which, fesembling the palpable demonstration 
they afford, (even to the most bigoted incredulist) are in the 
Astral science esteemed the most powerful of the whole. 

Now at the equator, where the sun is vertical, and all celes- 
tial arcs are measured by rectangles, equal parts of the zodiac 
pass through the great circle of the equator in equal times, or 
in other words, every house of heaven would contain just thirty 
degrees ; but in every other part of the globe, the oblique in- 
clination of the earth in her orbit, (which causes the length 
and shortness of our days) causes the Sun apparently to rise 



THE TWELVE HOUSIirS OF HEAVEN. 9S 

earlier/and s6t later atone period of the year than another; 
and this causes his «emi-diarnai ate, or the apparent space be^ 
tween 9un riving and noon, to be greater or less, as the year 
advances or decreases ; therefore, When the time of siin rising- 
is obtained, and subtracted from noonrday, it is self-evident the 
difference will give a certain space of time, which in hours and 
minutes, constitutes iM{f the day. This space of time the As«* 
trologer next turns into degrees and minutes, (by multiplying 
each hour by fifteen degrees of the equator, and the minutes in 
proportion) which measured on the tropic of Cancer, and di- 
vided into two other equal paTts> caus0s the space between Suo 
riseand noon-day tabave three equal divisions, thus constituting 
two other houses of heaven, namely, the eleventh and twelfth 
houses. The same method is pursued on the same principles, 
with the remaining part of the great diurnal and nocturnal 
circle, giving for the result, the whole of the twelve celestial 
houses, which thus are proved to be neither visionary nor ima- 
ginary, but founded on truths, as solid and substantial, as the 
course of the sun through thefirmamerU, (or in other words^ of 
the earth around that luminary) and defying the most acute 
incredulist to deny their existence. 

*< The weftem Sun withdrawi ; mennwhile'the Moon 
FuU orb*d, and breaking through the scattered douds, . 
Shows her broad visage in the crimsoned east" 

Thomson. 

The four first of these houses, namely ,the first, tenth, seventh, 
and fourth, are termed angles, as being of the greatest strength 
and power ; the next four are termed succeedents, as being qf 
less energy, but still next in sympathetic power, and are the 
second, fifth, eighth, and eleventh houses. The weakest of all 
in influence are the eadent, which are the third, ninth, ^ixtb, 
and twelfth houses ; and it is not without reason that these 
divisions are made, which the attentive student, who wishes to 
read the true language of the si^rsj will<»ost readily discover; 
in which respect he will reap the benefit of the " labours of 
ages," and from the rust of antiquity will distinguish the true 
polish of substantial science. 



'04 



A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGT. 



There have been various opinions amongst Astrological wri- 
ters, as to the nature and effect of certain aspects, familiarities, 
and con figurations of the active and passive stars or agents ; 
bat in the effects of thc^ houses, they are nearly all (or quite 
all) ananimous, both in the oriental and European regions; 
which we will now proceed to illustrate, in a manner intelli- 
gible to any one, that will but pursue the subject with a little 
undivided add close attention. 



i^oon^trai?. 



O X \ LONG JOURNEYS 

^V^o FRIKND8 ^^/>- X 






^ HONOR ^\% C*/-^ 



'* "^^.^ 



^•^\ 



s^^ LIFE 
HEALTH 



<£ 






Particular Significations 



OP THE 

Twelve Celestial Houses, 

According to various 

Astrological Authors 



RICHES 



^ INHERITANCES 
<^ KINDRED ^^N- ® 



DEATH 



MARRIAGE 

SICKNESS 



V 



and ~'^ 

SHORT JOURNEYS 



A^ 






*^y^^ CHILDREN ^ 



i^tlOn^nisDt. 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OF HEAVEN. 96 



ASTROLOGICAL EFFECTS 



OF THE 

From the most renowned Authors and selectest manuscript 

writings, 

<' Thus measuring things in beav'n by things on earth 
At thy request, and that thou may'st beware 
By what is past, to thee 1 have reveal'd 
What might have else to human race been hid." 

MiLTOK. 

Astrologers in their descriptions usually commence \rith the 

FIRST HOUSE, 

or house of '' Life,*' the point of the Eastern angle and horizon, 
the celestial sign, ascending on which point, at the instant of 
birth, and the stars or planets located therein, bears the most 
powerful influence upon the life and destiny of the native (or 
person whose horoscope it is). Saturn or Mars in this house 
never fail to give accidents and illness, when directed to the 
cusp of the ascendant, as also to be a perpetual trouble through- 
out life ; while Jupiter or Venus therein, free fcom affliction, are 
perpetual tokens of good fortune, eminent success, and lasting 
credit. The sign ascending will also peculiarly mark the bodily 
form and mental intellect. In horary questions, this house 
relates to all questions of life, health, and appearance ; as sta- 
ture, colour, shape, sickness, and accidents ; it also shows the 
events of journeys, voyages, &c., with respect to the life and 
health of the querent engaged in them : it is invariably the 
chief significator when life and health are concerned. In State 



06 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

questions, comets^ eclipses, &c , as also at the annual ingress of 
the Sun into Aries ; the first house signifies the people at large, 
or the health and well being of the kingdom where it is erected, 
and wherein the general mass of inhabitants are concerned. By 
being considered as the symbolical ascendant of any other 
person, either related or not related, near or absent, it will shew 
the same to them, as if the figure had been erected at their own 
request. Accprding ta (;t very, old manuscript of the twelfth 
centwy, it signifies " the money of private enemies, as being 
the second house in order from the twelfth ; the brethren of 
friends, as being the third from the eleventh house ; it signifies 
the fathers of kings, as being the fourth from the tenth house ; 
also children of religious folks, for it is the fifth from the ninth 
house ; also the sickness of his open (or public) enemies, as 
being the sixth house from the seventh in order ; and upon the 
wife of his open enemy, or of fellows, (or partners) for it is 
opposed to the seventh house : it also signifies upon death €^f 
servants, as it is the eighth, reckoning from the sixth house ; 
it is jthe significator of religion and long journeys to the askers 
children, being the ninth house from the fifth, and upon magis- 
tery and dignity of hi» fathei^, being the tenth to the fourth 
house ; also friends to the askers brethren, being the eleventh 
hoUse from the thirds and t^ the askers self it personates' the 
beginning and fate of eveiiy baxardous enterprise/' 

It is a masculine hoose^ and rules the head and face the 
same as the sign r • 

OF THE SECOND HOUSE. 

The next house in order from the ascendant is the second 
house, or house of '' Riches," This signifies the estate, fortune 
and property, riches, gain or loss in pecuniary affairs, poverty, 
misfortune, and in fact every thing relating to (that plague of 
the wise man> and that idol of the fool) gold, and '* the worlds 
wide wealth'' of him for whom the figure is cast. The ancient 
Astrologers attribute the same effects to this house, both in 
nativities and horary figures ; but this requires some explana- 
tory developement, for if the nativity be afflicted other ways, 
if the luminaries are evilly aspected by Saturn, Mars, or tiers* 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OF HEAVEN. ©7 

chel, even though Jupiter should be posited in the secfond 
house, aud in his most powerful dig-aities, the native would be 
far more liable to misfortune and loss than fortunate. The at- 
tentive student will at once perceive from this explanation, that 
the genuine principles of the celestial science are founded on 
philosophical axioms, which nothing can neutralise, and which 
invariably point to the same steady objects. 

In the questionary art, the second house denotes the money 
of the querent, his loss or gain in speculations relating to busi- 
ness or pecuniary affairs in general, or any question in particu- 
lar ; also of loans, friends, and assistants in law-suits, and such 
like. In State Astrology, it denotes allies, warlike officers, and 
the pecuniary resources of the nation at large ; especially in the 
scheme of the heaivens, which is cast for the vernal ingress. 
According to MSS. writers, the second house denotes '* inhe- 
ritance, lucre, and divers winning ; also it denoteiS the brethren 
of private enemies, for it is the third hoQse as accounted from 
the twelfth; and fathers, or grandsires of friends, for it is the 
fourth from the eleventh house ; also king's sons, for it is the 
fifth house from the mid-heaven ; also upon the deaith of wives, 
familiars, fellows, (partners) and open or public enemies, as- 
being the eighth hotise from the seventh, in due order ; also 
upon the religion and long joui'neys of servants, for it is the 
ninth reckoned from the sixth house ; also upon the trade, 
(magist^ry) credit, profession, and honor of children, as being 
the tenth house from the fifth ; also upon the friends and well-* 
wishers of fathers, being the eleventh reckoned from the fourth' 
bouse ; and lastly, upon private enemies of brethren as being 
the twelfth reckoned from the third house.'' 

It is a feminine house, and similar in effect to the sign (3 , 
ruling the neck and shoulders. 

OF THE THIRD HOUSE. 

Thi^ is the house of brethren, kindred; neighbours, cousins ; 
short inland journeys, letters, messages, rumours, and the re- 
moval of trade or employment. From this house the ancient 
Astrologers derived their judgment, relative to the kindred or 

O 



98 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

brethren of the native^ born under any particular horoscope^ 
with the good or bad fate attending them ; and also of those 
particular changes which were perpetually recurring throughout 
life ; in which particular they were accustomed to judge by the 
lords of the house, and triplicity, according to that sign or con- 
stellation of heaven which was found on the cusp, great part 
of which judgment can scarcely be relied upon ; but when ma- 
lefic or unfortunate stars, are located in this house, or in mun" 
dane square, semisquare, or opposition thereto, the attentive 
student will readily perceive appropriate evil effects, corres- 
ponding to the significations of the house above described, thus 
Saturn being there, is generally found to cause hatred and ill- 
fortune through brethren, neighbours, and short journeys — 
Herschel there, never permits the native to rest long in one 
place, or to meet with mutual affection from his kindred ; but 
Mars afflicted in the third bouse is said by the ancients to be 
" the very demon of discord and genius of ill luck in all things 
to which the house has relation." The good planets of course 
have benign effects, most palpably visible. 

In horary questions, every signification, of the house is al- 
lowed in lis full symbolical allusion, for in such cases the indi- 
cation will no doubt be complete : hence all questiona relative 
to the aforesaid subjects, are judged as well by the. lord of the 
house, as the accidental positions and configurations thereto. 
In addition to those descriptions, the following are manuscript ; 
" Zael,'' an Arabian writer of great repute, sets forth the third 
house as denoting *' sects, epistles, dreams, mutation, churches, 
clerks, carols, ^^hanging of women from place to place, &c. 
being the fourth house, as reckoned in order from the twelfth, 
it signifies the fathers of private enemies, the sons of friends 
being the fifth to the eleventh house; also the sickness of 
kings, for it is the sixth house from the tenth or mid-heaven ; 
also the enemies of religious persons, for it is the seventh house, 
or opposite to the ninth ; as well as the magistery (or trade) of 
servants, as being the tenth house to the sixth ; and the friends 
of children, being the eleventh house to the fifth ; and the pri- 
vate enemies of the fiither, as being the twelfth house in order 
from the fonrth house/' 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OP HEAVEN 99 

It is a masculine hoase, and similar to n , rultog' the arms, 
hands ^ and shoulders. 

OF THE FOURTH HOUSE. 

The lower ang^le of heaven, or fourth house, whose line, or 
cusp^ the Sun touches at midnigcht, is the wtakut in influeuce 
of all the other ang'les througphout the celestial drcle : it repre- 
sents in nativities, most powerfully the parents of the native, 
especially the father ; hut the opptmtum of Saturn, Mars, or 
Herschel to the raid-heaven, which is the same as coming to 
the cusp of this house, not only frequently afflicts the father, hut 
as an evil aspect to one angle, is &lt hy all four, (each aspect- 
ing* the other) frequently causes death or severe misfortunes to 
the native's mother. Good planets in this house (even Jupiter) 
lose much of their active influence, and are particularly weak, 
even as promitto/ps in directions. The ancients gave this house 
of heaven to represent the final end of all things, whether in 
nativities or horary questions. In the latter it represents the 
querent's father, his patrimony ; all affairs relating to lands, 
houses, cities, estates, towns, castles, hidden treasure, curious 
secrets, and all things belonging to the earth ; as also old bouses, 
ruinous buildings, moisiumepts of sepulchral arts or superstitious 
rites ; antiquities, gardens, fields, orchards, vineyards, corn 
fields, &c. : it is said to denote the house or residence of the 
querent at the time he wishes a question resolved, and ihe final 
issile of every undertaking, with its diversified or casual contin- 
gencies. *' Alcabitius" an old Astrologer, and other manuscript 
writers, say of this house, that it denotes '' dead men's goods, and 
all inheritances descending by a right line to the querent ; and 
of all things immoveable, as cities, castles, and such other, and 
of treasure hid, and of what shall befall the dead man in his 
grave, and (after his burial) to his corpse ; and what shall fall 
after death, as also to all questions touching the substance of 
brethren, being the second to the third house ; and of the chil- 
dren of private enemies, being the fifth house to the twelfth ; 
and sickness of friends, as being the sixth house accounted from 
the eleventh house ; also upon the king's enemies, being th« 



<100 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

seventh house from the tenth or mid-heaven ; and death of re- 
ligious persons, being the eighth house accounted from the 
ninth ; and upon the religion of the absent, as being the ninth 
to the eighth house ; also upon the (trade or) magistery of ene- 
mies, being the tenth from the seventh house ; also upon the 
friends and fortune of servants, being the eleventh to the sixth 
house ; and lastly, upon all questions relating to the private 
enemies of children, being the twelfth or house of enemies to 
the fifth house." 

It is a feminine house, and being represented by s , rules in 
like manner the breast and lungs, as that sign does; 

OF THE FIFTH HOUSE. 

From the fifth house, Astrologers both ancient and modern, 
deduce their judgments relative to the children or offspring of 
the native ; Ptolemy joins with this the angle of the mid-hea- 
ven, and also the eleventh house : it is said to be the house of 
children and women, which in horary Astrology it certainly is ; 
denoting also the father^s property, both personal and real ; 
childrens health and welfare, whether present or absent ; also 
all questions relating to pleasure, amusement, gaming, taverns, 
theatres, banquets and merry-making of all sorts ; it is also the 
house of pregnancy. 

In State Astrology, it denotes ambassadors or messengers ; as 
well the strength or weakness of any besieged place. Ac- 
cording to an ancient manuscript, Haly, and other Arabian 
Astrologers of past times, set forth various other significations 
of the fifth house, as denoting '' in the above art, the cheapness 
or deamess of bread, wine, and victuals in general for that re- 
gion to which the horoscope is erected.^' In horary questions,* 
the same authors write, " the fifth house signifies, upon chil- 
dren, delectation, pleasure and legacies ; also upon charters, 
books and messages ; it also signifies the brethren of brethren, 
for it is the third house accounted from the third; and the sub- 
stance of father's, being the second to the fourth house ; also 
the sickness of private enemies, being the sixth house from the 
twelfth ; and the enemies of friends, as being the seventh house 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OF HEAVEN. 101 

or opposite to the eleventh house ; and the death of kings or 
monarchs as being- the eighth house from the tenth, or medium 
cceli ; and long journeys of religious persons, as being the ninth 
house to the ninth ; and the magistery or dignity of the absent, 
as being the tenth to the eighth house ; also the friends of the 
askers or enquirers enemies, as being the eleventh to the se- 
venth house ; and lastly, the private enemies of servants, as 
being the twelfth house to the sixth/' It is a masculine house, 
and like Q , rules the stomach, liver, heart, sides, and back.* 

OF THE SIXTH HOUSE. 

Astrologers attribute to the sixth house an evil signification ; 
it is the house of sickness, and partly of private enemies, being 
in opposition to the twelfth house, and the parts of body which 
is ruled by the signs on the cusp of this house, or accidentally 
intercepted therein, are said to denote diseases. In horary ques- 
tions, it represents different effects, being the house not only of 
sickness, but of servants, dependants, uncles, aunts, and all kin- 
dred by the father's side ; small cattle, rabbits, sheep, goats and 
hogs ; tenants, stewards, shepherds, farmers, &c. : all questions 
relating to these subjects, are judged from the sixth house. In 
State Astrology, it denotes the sickness or health, of the com- 
munity at large. 

Manuscript, Arabian Astrologers represent the sixth house, 
as being " the house of vassals, beasts not ridden, also the sub- 
stance of children, as being the second house to the fifth ; and 
the brethren of fathers, for it is the third to the fourth bouse : 
and the fathers of brethren, as being fourth to the third house ; 
and also enemies of enemies, being the seventh house from the 
twelfth ; also the death of friends, as being the eighth house 
to the eleventh : and long journeys, and religion of kings, be- 
ing the ninth house to the tenth or medium coeli ; also magis- 
tery and lay dignities, being the tenth or house of honor to the 
ninth house ; and enemies of the absent, and private enemies of 
wives (and fellows), being the twelfth house to the seventh." 

It is a feminine house, and similar to nj^, ruling the abdomen 
and intestines. 



102 A iMANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



OF THE SEVENTH HOUSE. 

The seventh houfte, the cusp of which is the western line of 
the deseendihg hori^on^ or pdint where the Son seU ; is of great 
significance In Astrology, being most powerful in marriage and 
ctomestic happiness. If Saturn or Mars should happen to be 
posited in this house, unaided by the assisting beams of Jupiter 
or Venus; the native is certainly fated (from the malignant 
aspects of hostile stars) to be unfortunate in the wedded state, 
and bom to lead a life of continual trouble therein. Unhappi- 
ness in wedlock, arising from the most strange and unaccount- 
Me causes, afe also the edicts of Herschel, when found there- 
in ; in which respects the seventh house is certainly more 
powerful than the Moon or Venus, (which are the Ptolemian 
Astrologers' chief signiicators in marriage). In horary ques- 
tions, the seventh house denotes love questions, contracts, spe- 
culations in business, war^ or public duels, encounters with 
thieves, law-suits, public adversaries, partners in trade, and li- 
tigation ; it u the ascendant of thieves, and describes their per- 
sons and occupation. 

In State Astrology, it is the house from whence the event of 
war or peace is predicted. In a battle it denotes the victorious 
party; it also denotes run-a-ways, outlaws, and the place to 
which a person is going to remove or change their residence. 

Alcabitius, iEdila, Morbecca, and various Arabian Astrolo- 
gers, according to manuscripts, record the seventh house, ,as 
" the house of all eontentions, oppositions, contrariences, and 
things opposed ; upon battle, strife^ and enmity ; fines, pleas, 
laws, &c, ; and is the house of buying, selling, and nuptials ; 
death of enemies, friends of brethren> sons of friends, and the 
place of theft;" and in compound signification it is said to be 
" the house signifying the substance of servants, as being the 
second house to the sixth, in due order ; and sisters of brethren, 
being the third house to the fifth ; also the fathers of fathers, 
being the fourth house to the fourth ; and the children of bre- 
thren, being the fifth to the third house ; also it signifies the 
death of private enemies, being the eighth to the twelfth house : 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OF HEAYEN. 103 

as also for the same reason, the death of great beasts. Again it 
signifles the religion and long journeys of friends, being the 
ninth house to the eleventh ; also upon the honor or credit of 
kings^ being the tenth house to the mid-heaven ; and also the 
friends and fortune of religious persons, being the eleventh 
house to the ninth : as also the private dealings of the absent, 
and their enemies, as being the twelfth house from the eighth." 
It is accounted a masculine house, similar to i^ in its rule 
over the bodily members, which the student can refer to. 

OF THE EIGHTH HOUSE. 

This is termed the house of death, wills, legacies, portions, 
dowry of the wife ; and in law-suits it denotes the adversaries 
means, friends, and success. In duels it is the adversaries se- 
cond. It denotes tbe'property and means of the querent's part- 
ner, and the strength of public enemies. Although, in nativi- 
ties, the cause of death is not judged from this house of heaven, 
yet whenever Jupiter is therein, or even Venus, unafflicted, it 
is impossible the party should die violently. 

Manuscript Astrologers " of yore," describe this house, as 
symbolically representing ** labor, sorrow, battle, strife, slaugh- 
ter, dower and inheritance of the dead, and money of public 
enemies : it signifies also the brethren of servants, being the 
third house to the sixth ; and fathers of children, being the 
fourth house to the fifth ; and sickness of brethren, being the 
sixth house to the third ; also religion, and journeys of private 
enemies, being the ninth house to the twelfth ; and dignity and 
magistery of friends, being the tenth house to the eleventh ; 
and ki^gti friends, being the eleventh house to the mid-heaven ; 
also the private enemies of religious persons, being the twelfth 
house to the ninth." Haly, records the eighth house, as repre- 
senting '' Persons wretched and miserable, and liable to bodily 
deformities ; and whether the asker shall die in indigence or 
abundance." 

It is a feminine house^ similar to it\. in its rule over the parts 
of tlie body 



104 A 'MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



OF THE NINTH HOUSE 

In Astrology, the ninth house^ is called the house of religion, 
science, learning, books, writings, voyages and distant travels. 
It is peculiar to the church ; denoting all ecclesiastical matters, 
and all church preferments ; clergymen of every degree. Dreams, 
visions, and long journeys. In horary questions, the Arabian 
Astrologers of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, represent 
the ninth house as being " the house of faith^ wisdom^ and di- 
vine worshipping." Guido Bonatus calls it " the house of 
fame." Haly, terms it the house of prophets and prophecies, 
council^ and prayers ; others write it, as being " the house of the 
wifes, or enemies brethren, being the third house to the seventh, 
and fathers of servants, being the fourth house to the sixth ; 
and children of children, as being .the fifth house to the fifth. 
Also sickness of fathers, being the sixth house to the fourth ; 
and enemies of brethren, being the seventh house to the third ; 
also friends of friends, being the eleventh house to the eleventh : 
and private enemies of kings, being the twelfth house to the 
tenth house in the order of the heavens.'' 

It is a masculine house, like $ in bodily rule; denoting the 
same parts of the body which that sign does, 

OF THE TENTH HOUSE 

The mid'heaven, medium cceli, or angle of the South, whose 
line or cusp the sun touches at mid-day or noon, is termed the 
tenth house in the Astral art, and is the chief or supreme angle 
of the heavens ; denoting honor, credit, renown, authority, 
trade, preferment, &c. In nativities, the planets here are most 
powerful ; and while Jupiter, Venus, or Sol, herein, give great 
eminence in life, Saturn never fails to give disgrace and ruin, 
when alone or unaided by benevolent stars. In the former in- 
stance, may be noticed the Duke of Wellington, who has the 
good fortune to be born with Jupiter tn this ** house of honor ;" 
in the latter, the late emperor Napoleon, who born with Sa- 
turn his evil-star, in the tenth house, might well be expected 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OP HEAVEN. 105 

to have met with a downfal as rapid as his rise, and which se- 
veral French Astrologers predicted. — ^These' are two of the 
most illustrious instances of modern times, and well worthy the 
attention of those self-conceited but (in reality) simple persons, 
who affect to deny the validity of Astrological presages^ which 
are probably far above their puny comprehension. Many other 
instances could be given, but to the wise observer of nature, 
who possesses aught of " the milk of kind concession" where 
his learning does not reach, and to the philosophic enquirer, 
these will suffice. " Utrum horum mavis accipe," The tenth 
house is therefore a principal feature in Astrological predictions, 
as it is also in the arithmetical part of the science, or Astrono- 
mical calculations, since all arcs of directions to the angles are 
measured from the right ascension of the mid-heaven. 

In horary questions it denotes the mother of the querist: and 
in State Astrology, kings, emperors, nobles, dukes, empires, 
kingdoms, and provinces, with " the great " in general ; being 
the true ascendant of the mighty and powerful, and the house 
of " high'' or illustrious " life." 

Manuscript writers say it is the house " of lordship, honor, 
and dignity; and of all craft of which a man is master." 
Albateyzen, an ancient writer, further says, " it i^ the house of 
judges, judgment, substance taken away by thieves, also the 
substance or money of religious persons, being the second house 
to the ninth ; and brethren of the servants of open enemies, 
being the third to the eighth ; and fathers of enemies or fel- 
lows (partners,) being the fourth house to the seventh ; also 
children of servants, being the fifth to the sixth house ; and 
sickness of sons, being the sixth to the fifth house ; and public 
enemies, wives, and fellows of fathers, being the seventh or 
opposite house to the fourth, in due order ; also death of bre- 
thren, being the eighth house to the third ; and the religion of 
the servants of the asker, being the ninth house to the second ; 
also friends of private enemies, being the eleventh house to the 
twelfth ; and lastly, private enemies of friends, being the twelfth 
house to the eleventh." 

It is a feminine house, and being in order, similar to Vf ; rules 
the knees and hams. 



100 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



OF THE ELEVENTH HOUSE. 

Both the Oriental and Earopean Astrologers are unanimous 
in describing the eleventh house of heaven^ as being the house 
of /rtVnc^, wishes, hopes, desires, advisers, favourites, flatterers 
and such like contingencies. Mr. Wilson thinks the eleventh 
house of great power in nativities in a benevolent way. This, 
however, is by no means the case ; for the author of this work 
positively asserts from his own experience, that when evil 
planets are on the cusp of this house, or located therein, they 
are increased in evil, in a most remarkable proportion, and are 
worse there than in the sixth or twelfth, and nearly as bad as 
when angular. The student will soon perceive the truth of 
this axiom, if he examines a few correct nativities. 

In horary Astrology, according to every professor, if this 
house of heaven be afflicted by evil position or aspect, in any 
theme of heaven whatever, or upon any occasion, the querist, 
or enquirer, will suffer severe disappointment in the projected 
affair; and in State Astrolbgy, it represents the wealth and 
money, or the " exchequer" of the goverdment, and the friends 
or allies of the nation at large. 

Zael, Haly, Abenragel, Adila, Gerald, and manuseripi wri* 
ters of '* the olden time," state the eleventh house of heaven 
as being "the house of knights, esquires, ambassadors, and 
servants of great princes." Another author^ Alcabitius, states 
that " if a watery sign be on the cusp of this house, it is fortu- 
nate ; if an airy sign, it is typical of friends ; if an earthy sign, 
it denotes legacies or property of ancestors ; if hjiery sign-, it 
signifies honor and princely credit." This of course requires 
some limitation if evil planets should be there : yet the Arabian 
Astrologers, it must be confessed, were far more clever in the 
art than the Europeans are, and in horary Astrology especially, 
the student will do well to attend rather closely to their rules, 
ere he rejects any part as superfluous. Other writers of the 
same period say, " this house signifies tlie money or substance 
of monarchs, being the second house to the tenth ; and brethren 
of religious persons, for it is third to the ninth house ; and 



THE TWELVE HOUSES OF HEAVEN. lO? 

children of enemies, or wives^or partners, being the fifth house 
to the seventh ; also sickness of servants, being the sixth to 
the sixth house ; and enemies and wives of offspring, being the 
seventh house to the fifth ; and also the death of fathers, being 
the eighth house to the fourth ; also religion and long journeys 
of brethren, being the ninth bouse to the third ; and lastly, the 
private enemies of private enemies, being the twelfth house to 
the twelfth." 

It is a masculine house, and like ss rules the legs and ancles, 
as that sign does. 

OF THE TWELFTH HOUSE. 

The Ictst house for us to describe is the twelfth house of the. 
celestial circle, or the house o( private enemies ; imprisonment, 
cares, anxieties, misery, and suffering. In horary questions, it 
denotes every kind of grief, persecution, malice, secret toil of 
mind, envy, incarceration, treason, sedition, assassination, and 
suicide. It is also thQ house of cattle and great beasts. In na- 
tivities, the rule above does not hold good, for the student in 
celestial philosophy will soon perceive in the course of his 
practice, that the evil planets therein, are fbrless evil hnd weaker 
in mischief than when angular ; or even in the eleventh or fifth 
houses. This axiom (the author's own experience) no former 
author has recorded ; it is nevertheless strictly true. 

Manuscript observations on liorary questions, state this house 
as signifying " deceivers, envious, bewailing, sorrowing, weep- 
ing, lamenting, blaspheming, imprisoning, and malevolence." 
Others say, it is the house of horses, asses, and beasts that are 
ridden ; also, according to Haly, " it represents banished per- 
sons, malefactors, lost goods never recovered, long hidden 
wrath, vile persons, reproaches, disobedient ; as also the foetus 
of animals previous to birth. Adila and Zael, two very ancient 
writers, have these curious remarks relative to the nature of 
the twelfth house : " It is the house of captives and imprison- 
ment ; but note well that the wise men have different signifi- 
cations of imprisonment, for the taking, and the cause thereof, 
is signified by the eighth house, and the twelfth house, the 



i08 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

place of imprisonment and him that is imprisoned." Also 
others relate ** that this house signifies the substance or money 
of friends^ being* the second house to the eleventh ; and bre- 
thren of kings, being the third to the tenth, or mid-heaven ; 
and fathers of religious persons, being the fourth house to the 
ninth ; and sons of the absent, being the fifth house to the 
eighth ; also it signifies as well, the sickness of wives, being 
the sixth house to the seventh, or west angle ; and servants 
enemies, being the seventh house, or opposite to the sixth ; and 
the death of children, being the eighth house to the fifth ; and 
religion and long journeys to fathers, being the ninth house to 
the fourth ; also lastly, the magistery (or trade) of brethren, 
as it is the tenth to the third house.*' 

It is a feminine house and like H rules the feet. 

The student will bear in mind, that in the foregoing descrip- 
tion, (which the diagram, at page, 91. will illustrate,) the 
angular houses of heaven are first in power, strength, and 
efiBcacy, whether in good or evil. 

The succeedent houses are second in influence, but by far 
more weak in strength and power ; and. 

The cadent houses are, by the generality of Astrologers, 
esteemed as the weakest of the whole. This order of the 
houses, with few exceptions, the author admits also, in his 
system ; but more especially as it relates to the four cardinal 
houses, or angles, which certainly are by far the most powerful ; 
whether in nativities, horary questions, or themes of heaven for 
any occasion whatever. 



,1 




In the above diagram, by referring to any parlicular house 
the Etudeot will easily perceive the various compound signiSca- 
tions of its symbolical indication. As these are not to be found 
in any author whatever, but are transcribed from a vert/ ancient 
and original manuscript, long before printing was invented, the 
author presumes that they will be deemed very acceptable, even 
by those who are skilled In these sciences ; while to the stu- 
dent in Astrology, it will no doubt be a treasure, duly appre- 
ciated, as it is well worthy attention. 



*' Experience, nest lo (hee I one, 
Hea guide; not fallowing Ihea, I had 
Jb ignonuice ; thou opeti'st wicdom'a n 



Jb ignonui 



wicdom'a wij, 
tduMtiie. 



pv « ncceiB. though seciei me teoie. 

— Heaven ia high. 
High, and remote to see from ihenM dirilncf 
Each Ibing on earth," 



MlLTOK. 



10 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

PERPETUAL TABLES 

OF THE 

CELESTIAL HOUSES 

For casting: Nativities, and erecting Themes of Heaven. 
Cakttlaiedfor the Latitade qf London. 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



Ill 



PERPETUAL TABLES 

OF THE . 



CELESTIAL HOUSES 

For casting Nativities, and erecting Themes of Heaven. 
Calculated/or the Latitude ofLoncUm. 



S>o\ in i&tminU 


S)Ol in <rancer. 


Time 

from 
Noon. 


10 

n 


11 12 


Ascen. 

1* 


2 3 


Time 

from 

Noon. 


10 

o 



11 

a 

o 
6 


12 
o 


Ascen. 

.A. 


2 

o 


3 

o 

24 


H. M. 


o 


o 


o 


If 


H. 


M. 


o 


u 


3 51 





s 


11 


7 


22 


28 


25 


6 





6 





024 


3 55 


1 


912 


8 


6 29 


26 


6 


4 


1 


7 


7;o 


4725 


25 


4 


2 


1012 


8 


50 


J\. 


27 


6 


9 


2 


8 


s\ 1 


3326 


26 


4 4 


3 


10 13 


9 


34 


1 


28 


6 


13 


3 


9 


9 


2 


19 27 


27 


4 8 


4 


11 


14 


10 


18 


2 


29 


6 


17 


4 


10 


10 3 


5 27 


28 


4 12 


5 


12 


15 


11 


3 


2m 1 


6 


22 


5 


11 


10 3 


5128 


29 


4 16 


6 


13 


16 


11 


47 


3 


1 


6 


26 


6 


12 


11 


4 


27 29 


t 


4 21 


7 


14 


17 


12 


31 


4 


2 


6 


31 


7 


13 


12 


5 


23 m 


1 


4 25 


8 


15 


17 


13 


16 


5 


3 


6 


35 


8 


14 


13 


6 


9 


1 


2 


4 29 


9 


16 


18 


14 


1 


6 


4 


6 


39 


9 


15 


14 


6 


55 


2 


3 


4 33 


10 


17 


19 


14 


46 


7 


5 


6 


41 


10 


16 


15 


7 


40 


2 


4 


4 38 


11 


18 


20 


15 


31 


8 


6 


6 


48 


11 


16 


16 


8 


26 


3 


4 


4 42 


12 


19 


21 


16 


16 


8 


7 


6 


52 


12 


17 


16 


9 


12 


4 


5 


4 46 


13 


20 


21 


17 


1 


9 


8 


6 


57 


13 


18 


17 


9 


57 


5 


6 


4 51 


14 


2i 


22 


17 


46 


10 


9 


/ 


] 


14 


19 


1810 


41 


6 


7 


4 55 


15 


22 


23 


18 


3i 


11 10 


7 


5 


15 


20 


1911 


28 


7 


8 


4 59 


16 


23 


24 


19 


ir 


1211 


7 


9 


16 


21 


20 12 


14 


8 


9| 


5 3 


17 


24 


25 


20 


4 


1312 


7 


14 


17 


22 


21 


12 


59 


8 


10 


5 8 


18 


25 


26 


20 


49 


1413 


7 


18 


18 23 


22 13 


45 


9 


111 


5 12 


19 


25 


27 


21 


35 


14|]4 


7 


22 


19 


24 


22 


14 


30 


10 


12 


5 16 


20 


26 


28 


22 


20 


15 


14 


7 


27 


20 


25 


23 


15 


14 


11 


13 


5 21 


21 


27 


28 


23 


6 


16 


15 


7 


31 


21 


26 


24 


15 


59 


12 


14 


5 25 


22 


28 


29 


23 


5\ 


17 


16 


7 


35 


22 


27 


25 


16 


44 


13 


I5| 


5 29 


23 


29 


^ 


24 


37 


18 


17 


7 


39 


23 


28 


26 17 


29 


13 


16 


5 34 


24 


a 


1 


25 


25 


19 


18 


7 


44 


24 


29 


2718 


14 


14 


17 


5 38 


25 


1 


2 


26 


9 


20 


19 


7 


48 


25 


^ 


2818 


58 


15 


18 


5 43 


26 


2 


3 


26 


55 


20 


20 


7 


51 


26 


1 


28 


19 


42 


16 


19 


5 47 


27 


3 


4 


27 


41 


21 


21 


7- 


56 


27 


2 


29 


20 


26 


17 


20 


5 51 


28 


4 


4 


28 


27 22 


22 


8 





28 


3 


j\. 


21 


10 


18 


20 


5 56 


29 


5 


5 


29 


1323 


23 


8 


5 


29 4 


1 


21 


54 


18 


21 


6 


30 6 


630 


24 


24 


8 


9 


30 5 


2 


22 


38 


19 221 



112 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



PERPETUAL TABLES 

OF THE 



CELESTIAL HOUSES 

For casting Nativities, and erecting Themes of Heaven. 
Calculated for the Latitude of London. 



^Ql in%to. 



Time 

from 

Noon. 



H. M. 



10 



8 9 

8 13 

8 17 

8 21 

8 25 

8 29 

8 34 

8 38 

8 42 

8 46 

8 50 

8 54 

8 58 

9 2 



9 
9 
9 
9 



9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

10 
10 
10 



6 
10 
14 
18 



9 22 
9 26 



30 
34 
38 
41 
45 
4.0 
53 

57 
1 
5 

8 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 



11 



5 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

II 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 



12 



2 

3 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

19 



26 20 

27t21 



2822 
2823 
29 23 

£i:24 

l|25 
2 26 



Ascen. 


2 


.n. 


TTl 


O // 


o 


22 38 


19 


23 22 


20 


24 5 21 


24 4822 


25 3223 


26 1 6 23 


26 5824 


27 42 25 


28^ 23 26 


29 6 27 


29 48 27 


0in30 28 


1 13 29 


1 ^5 


t 


2 36 


1 


3 18 


2 


4 


2 


4 41 


3 


5 21 


4 


6 4 


5 


6 45 


5 


7 26 


6 


8 6 


7 


8 47 


8 


9 28 


9 


10 8 


9 


10 48 


10 


11 29 


11 


12 9 


12 


12 50 


12 


13 30 


!3 



3 

t 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

Vf 

1 

2 

3 

4 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

20 



^01 itt mvQo. 



Time 

from 

Noon. 



H. M. 



10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

1 
1 
1 
1 
i 
1 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
I 

12 



8 
12 
16 
20 
24 
28 
31 
35 
39 
42 
46 
50 
54 

b7 
1 

5 
9 
12 
16 
20 
23 
27 
31 
34 
38 
42 
45 
49 
53 
56 




10 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 



11 



12 



2\26 
3 26 



4 
5 



5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

17 



Ascen. 



// 



27 

28 

29 
29 

1 

2 

2 

3 

4 

4 

5 

6 

7 

7 

8 

9 
I8IOI26 
19 1026 
201127 
211228 

22 1 328 

23 1329 
23 1429 



13 
14 
J4 
.15 
16 
16 
17 
18 
18 
19 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
24 
24 
25 



24 15 

25 15 

26 16 
26 17 
127 17 




I 
2 
2 
3 



30 

9 
49 
29 

9 
48 
28 

9 
48 
28 

8 
48 
26 

5 
45 
24 

4 
43 
23 

1 
4] 
22 

1 
40 
20 
59 
^39 
19 

8 
39 
10 



2^3 



13 

14 

15 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

Vf 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

5 

6 

7 

8 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

¥«Af. 
Vwk 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

\6 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



113 



PERPETUAL TABLES 

OP THE 



CELESTIAL HOUSES 

For casting Nativities, and erecting^ Themes of Heaven. 
CalcukUedfor the Latitude qf London. 



S>ol in Itfbra. 


^tH m ^torpib. 


TiAie 


10|11 


12 


Ascen. 


2 


3 


Time 
from ' 
Noon. 


10 


11 


12 


Asceo. 


2 


3 


iroui 

Noon. 


■n. 


-n. 


m 


■ 


t 


o 


o 




o 


t 

o 




t 


o 


K 

o 


H. M : 


o 


O 


o 


o 


II 


H. M. 


o 


II 


12 





27 


17 


3 


19 


8 


21 


13 51 





22 


10 


25 


•15 


JO 


27 


12 4 


1128 


18 


3 


59 


9 


22 


13 55 


1 


23 


11 


26 


5 


il 


28 


12 7 


2 29 


19 


4 


49 


10 


24 


13 59 


2 


24 


11 


26 


50 


12 


r 


12 11 


3 


m 


20 


5 


20 


11 


25 


14 3 


3 


25 


12 


27 


47 


14 


1 


12 15 


4 


1 


20 


6 


2 


12 


26 


14 7 


4 


26 


13 


28 


39 


15 


2 


12 18 


5 


1 


21 


6 


43 


13 


27 


14 1] 


5;26 


14 29 


31 


16 


4 


12 22 


6 


2 


22 


7 


24 


14 


28 


14 15 


6 


27 


15 


0Vf24 


18 


5 


12 26 


7 


3 


23 


8 


5 


15 


29 


14 \9 


7 


28 


15 


1 


18 


19 


6 


12 29 


8 


4 


23 


8 


46 


16 


K 


14 22 


8 


29 


16 


2 


13 


20 


8 


12 Si 


9 


5 


24 


9 


28 


17 


2 


14 26 


9 


t 


17 


3 


10 


22 


9 


12 37 


10 


6 


25 


10 


10 


18 


3 


14 30 


10 


1 


18 


4 


6 


23 


10 


12 40 


11 


6 


25 


10 


52 


19 


4 


14 34 


11 


2 


19 


5 


3 


25 


11 


12 44 


12 


7 


26 


11 


35 


20 


5 


14 38 


12 


2 


20 


6 


1 


26 


13 


12 48 


13 


8 


27 


12 


18 


21 


6 


14 42 


13 


3 


20 


7 





28 


14 


12 51 


14 


9 


28 


12 


59 


22 


7 


14 46 


14 


4 


21 


8 





29 


15 


12 55 


15 


10 


28 


13 


43 


23 


9 


14 50 


15 


5 


22 


9 


2 


K 


\7 


12 59 


16 


11 


29 


14 


26 


24 


10 


14 U 


16 


6 


23 


10 


5 


3 


18 


13 3 


17 


11 


t 


15 


10 


25 


11 


14 58 


17 


7 


24 


M 


9 


4 


19 


13 6 


18 


12 


1 


15 


54 


26 


12 


15 2 


18 


8 


25 


12 


14 


6 


21 


13 10 


19 


13 


1 


16 


39 


27 


13 


15 6 


19 


9 


26 


13 


21 


8 


22 


13 14 


20 


14 


2 


17 


23 


28 


15 


15 10 


20 


9 


27 


14 


29 


9 


23 


13 18 


21 


15 


3 


18 


8 


29 


16 


15 14 


21 


10 


27 


15 


37 


11 


24 


13 2] 


22 


16 


4 


18 


54 




17 


15 18 


22 


11 


28 


16 


46 


13 


26 


13 25 


23 


[Q 


4 


19 


39 


1 


18 


15 22 


23 


12 


29 


17 


58 


14 


27 


13 29 


24 


17 


5 


20 


26 


2 


20 


15 26 


24 


13 


Vf 


19 


11 


16 


28 


13 33 


25 


18 


6 


21 


14 


4 


21 


15 31 


25 


14 


1 


20 


27 


17 


29 


13 36 


26 


19 


7 


22 


1 


5 


22 


15 35 


26 


15 


2 


21 


43 


19 


b 


13 40 


27 


20 


7 


22 


49 


6 


23 


15 39 


27 


16 


3 


23 


3 


21 


2 


13 44 


28 


21 


8 


23 


37 


7 


25 


15 43 


28 


17 


4 


24 


24 


22 


3 


13 48 


29 21 


9 


24 


26 


8 


26 


15 47 


^9 


18 


5 


25 


46 


24 


5 


13 52 


30 22 


1025 


15 


10 


27 


15 51 


3018 


6 


27 


10 


26 


6 



H 



4 A MANUAL OF ASTROt-OOY. 

PERPETUAL TABLES 

OF THE 

CELESTIAL HOUSES 

For casting Nativitiet, and erectiDg Tbemes of Heaven. 
Cakmlatedfor the Latibidt <^ Landau. 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



115 



PERPETUAL TABLES 

OF THE 



CELESTIAL HOUSES 

Calculatedfor the Latitude qf London. 



3^1 in ^VMxit^* 



^01 in ^i^ttS. 



Time 

from 

Nogia. 



H.M. 



20 9 

20 13 

20 17 

20 21 

2q 25 

20 29 

20 34 

20 38 

20 42 

2Q 46 

20 50 

20 54 

20 58 

21 2 



21 
21 



6 
10 



21 i4 

18 
22 
21 ^6 

2\ m 

21 



21 38 

21 41 

2t 45 

21 49 

2) 53 

21 &7 

22 ] 
22 5 
22 6 



10 



20 



9421 



22 



25 
25 
27 
28 
20 
30^ 



11 





1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
1919 



24 
25 
27 
28 
29 

H 
2 

3 

4 

5 

7 

8 

9 

II 

12 

13 

15 

16 

\l 



20 
22 
23 



2324 
2425 



28 
29 

T 
2 
3 



12 

r 



4 
6 
7 
9 
11 
13 
14 
16 
18 
19 
21 
23 
24 
26 
28 
29 

2 
4 
5 
7 
8 



14 
15 
16 
18 
19 
20 



Ascen. 

n 



II 



2 

4 

5 

6 

8 

9 

10 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

22 

23 

23 

24 

25 

26 



1027 
1128 
1329 



50 
14 
37 
58 
17 
33 
49 

3 
14 
24 
32 
40 
46 
51 
56 
58 




59 
58 
55 
51 
47 
41 
36 
29 
22 
14 

4 
56 



2 

n 



24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

1 
2 
3 
3 
4 



8 



10 



Os 

1 

2 

3 

3 

4 454201 



11 
12 
13 
14 
\5 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
19 



3 



12 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
21 



5 22 
23 
724 



25 



9 26 



27 



10|28 



28 
29 

1 
2 
3 
4 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



time jlO 



from 
Noon. 



H. M. 



22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
24 



8 
12 
16 
20 
24 
27 
31 
35 
39 
42 
46 
50 

57 
1 

5 

9 

12 

16 



K 



20)9 



23 
27 
31 
34 
38 
42 
45 
49 
53 
56 






I 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 



11112 

r 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



3 

4 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

12 

13 

14 

15 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

29 

1 
2 
3 



20 
21 
23 
24 



Ascen. 



25 
26! 
2S| 
29 

n 
1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

^. 
10 



11 19 



12 



1320 



14 
15 
16 



41823 



5!l9 
620 
8:21 



4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

8 

9 

10 

11 

It 

12 

13 

14 

14 

15 

16 

17 

17 

18 



21 
21 
22 



1723 



24 
25 
26 



II 



45 



35 21 



23 
J2 



2 



20 



22 
23 



023 
4824 
35 25 
2226 

736 

5227 
3728 
2229 

7129 

a 



52 
35 
17 

1 
44 
26 

9 



19 52 



5S5 

39 

21 

2 



9\2m6 4212:. 3 



1 

2 
2 
3 



3 

8 
8 
P 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
\9 
20 
2i 
22 
123 



524 
24 



32 6125 
14 726 
56 727 
37 828 
18 9^28 



9.29 
10^1)? 



II 
12 



1 
2 



110 



A UA%VAL OF ASTKOLOGT. 



A PERPETDAL TABLE 



OW THE 



UN'S BIGHT ASCENSION IN TIME, 

At fioon, for each day in the year ; 
For eoMtmg NatwiiieB, amd eredimg Uumea ef A 



1 

1 


Jaauarf, 


F^tmuuj 


Mardi. 


AjiriL 


May. 


-^1 


h m i 


h m 1 


hmJjk'mJhmJjkmt^'l 


18 43 66 


2O60 3C 


22 40 34 


043 6 


2 34 20 


4 37 5! 1 1 


2 


18 48 24 


21 36 


22 63 18 


46 43 


2 38. S 


4 41 11 


2 


3 


18 62 48 


21 4 39 


22 67 2 


060 22 


2 41 60 


4 45 n 


3 


4 


18 67 13 


21 8 42 


23 046 


064 


245 49 


4 49 24 


4 


6 
6 


19 1 37 


21 12 44 


23 428 


67 39 


2 49 40 


4 53 31 


5 


19 6 1 


21 10 46 


23 8 11 


1 1 18 


263 32 


4 57 38 6 


7 


19 10 24 


21 20 4^ 


23 11 62 


1 467 


2 67 24 


5 1 46 7 


8 


19 14 47 


21 24 46 


23 16 34 


1 837 


3 1 16 


5 5 63 


8 


9 


19 19 9 


21 28 46 


23 19 16 


1 12 16 


3 6 9 


5 10 1 


9 


10 
11 


19 23 30 


21 32 43 


23 22 66 


1 16 66 


3 9 3 


5 14 9 


10 
11 


19 27 61 


21 36 40 


23 26 36 


1 19 36 


3 12 57 


5 18i 17 


12 


19 32 12 


21 40 37 


23 30 16 


1 23 16 


3 16 62 


6 22 26 


12 


13 


19 30 31 


21 44 32 


23 33 66 


1 26 67 


3 20 48 


626 36 


13 


14 


19 40 60 


21 48 27 


23 37 36 


1 30 38 


3 24 43 


530 44j 


14 


16 

16 


19 46 9 


21 62 21 


23 41 16 


1 34 19 


3 28 40 
3 32 37 


5 34 63 


15 
16 


19 49 27 


21 66 16 


23 44 64 


1 38 I 


6 39 2 


17 


19 63 44 


22 7 


23 48 33 


1 41 43 


3 36 35 


6 43 11 


17 


18 


19 68 


22 3 69 


23 62 11 


1 46 ^ 


3 40 33 


6 47 21 


18 


10 


20 2 16 


22 7 61 


23 66 60 


1 49 ,8 


3 44 32 


6 61 30 


19 


20 
21 


20 6 31 


22 11 41 


23 69 28 


I 62 62 


3 48 31 


6 66 40 


20 
21 


20 10 46 


22 16 31 


3 6 


1 66 36 


3 62 31 


6 69 60 


22 


20 14 69 


22 19 21 


6 44 


2 020 


3 56 32 


6 369 


22 


23 


20 19 11 


22 23 9 


10 22 


2 4 4 


4 0^ 


6 8 9 


23 


24 


20 23 23 


22 26 67 


14 


2 7 49 


4 4 36 


6 12 18 


24 


26 
20 


20.27 34 


22 30 46 


17 38 


2 11 36 


4 8 37 


6 16 28 


26 
26 


20 31 46 


22,34 42 


6 21 16 


2 16 21 


4 12 39 


6 20 37 


27 


20 36 66 


2^2 38 18 


24 64 


2 19 8 


4 16 43 


6 24 46 


27 


28 


20 40 3 


2242 4 


28 32 


2 22 66 


4 20 46 


6 28 66 


28 


29 


20 44 11 


22' 46 49 


32 10 


226 43 


4 24 60 


633 4 


29 


30 


20 48 10 




36 48 


2 30 31 


4 28 56 


6 37 13 


30 




31 


20 62 26 




39.27 




4 33 10 


•- 


31 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



117 



A PERPETUAL TABLE 



OF THE 



SUN'S EIGHT ASCENSION IN TIME, 

. At NooD« for each day in the year ; 
JPor easting Nativities, and erecting Themes of Heaven, 





*-< 

Cfi 

• 

1 


July. 


August. 


Septexn. 


October. 


Novem. 


Decern. 


1 

1 




h m s 


h m s 


h m s 


h m 8 


h m s 


h m s 




6 41 21 


8 46 "8 


10 42 10 


12 30 14 


14 26 34 


16 30 29 




2 


6 45 29 


8 50 1 


10 45 47 


12 33 52 


14 30 30 


16 34 49 


2 




3 


6 49 37 


8 53 53 


10 49 25 


12 37 30 


14 34 26 


16 39 9 


3 




4 


6 53 45 


8 57 44 


10 53 2 


12 41 8 


14 38 24 


16 43 30 


4 




5 

6 


6 57 52 


9 1 35 


10 56 38 


12 44 47 


14 42 22 


16 47 52 


5 
6 




7 1 58 


9 5 25 


11 15 


12 48 26 


14 46 21 


16 52 14 




7 


7 6 5 


9 9 15 


11 3 51 


12 52 5 


14 50 21 


16 56 36 


7 




8 


7 10 11 


9 13 4 


11 7 27 


12 55 45 


14 54 22 


17 59 


a 




9 


7 14 16 


9 16 53 


11 11 3 


12 59 25 


14 58 23 


17 5 23 


Q 




10 
11 


7 18 22 


9 20 40 


U 14 39 


13 3 6 


15 2 26 


17 9 47 


10 

11 




7 22 26 


9 24 28 


11 18 15 


13 6 47 


15 6 29 


17 14 11 


• 


12 


7 26 31 


9 28 14 


11 21 50 


13 10 29 


15 10 33 


17 18 36 


12 




13 


7 30 34 


9 32 1 


11 25 26 


13 14 11 


15 14 38 


17 23 1 


13 




14 


7 34 38 


9 35 46 


11 29 1 


13 17 54 


15 18 44 


17 27 26 


14 


• 


15 


7 38 41 


9 39 32 


11 32 37 


13 21 37 


15 22 51 


17 31 52 


15 
16 


• 


16 


7 42 43 


9 43 16 


11 36 12 


13 25 21 


15 26 58 


17 36 18 




17 


7 46 45 


9 47 


11 39 48 


13 29 5 


15 31 7 


17 40 44 


17 




18 


7 50 47 


9 50 44 


11 43 23 


13 32 50 


15 35 16 


17 45 11 


18 




19 


7 54 47 


9 54 27 


11 46 59 


13 36 36 


15 39 27 


17 49 37 


19 




520 


7 58 48 


9 58 10 


11 50 34 


13 40 23 


15 43 38 


17 54 4 


20 
21 




21 


8 2 48 


10 1 52 


11 54 10 


13 44 10 


15 47 50 


17 58 31 




22 


8 6 47 


10 5 34 


11 57 46 


13 47 57 


15 52 2 


18 2 58 


22 


« 


23 


8 10 48 


10 9 15 


12 1 21 


13 51 46 


15 56 16 


18 7 24 


23 




24 


8 14 44 


10 12 56 


12 4 57 


13 55 35 


16 30 


18 11 51 


24 


• 
• 


25 


8 18 42 


10 16 37 


12 8 34 


13 59 25 


16 4 45 


18 16 18 


25 
26 


• 


26 


8 22 39 


10 20 17 


12 12 10 


14 3 15 


16 9 


18 20 44 




27 


8 26 35 


10 23 57 


12; 15 46 


14 7 6 


16 13 17 


18 25 11 


27 


J 


28 


8 /to 31 


10 27 36 


12 19 23 


14 10 58 


16 17 34 


18 29 37 


28 




29 


8 34 26 


10. 31 15 


12 23 


14 14 51 


16 21 52 


18 34 3 


29 




30 


8 38 21 


10 34 53 


12 26 37 


14 18 45 


16 26 10 


1^38 28 


30 




31 


8 42 15 


10 38 32 




14 22 39 




18 42 54 


3> 









118 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGT. 



INSTRUCTIONS 

FOR 

ER&CTING A THEME OF HEAVEN, 

AND 

BjF the fbregowg-Perpetual Tables. 

«t Well, rest be with him ! he instiUecl into me cnoagh of knowledge for erecting 
a scheme of nativity, and therefore I will piesently go aboat it. So saying, and 
having noted the positions of the principal pUmetaiy bodies, Guy Mannering re- 
turned to the hoose.** 

AtTTHOE or Wavsklt. 

Thk theine^ or figure of the heavens, (which like a celestial 
map ^ivea at one view tibe ascending'^ descending:, and cnlmi- 
nating constellations^) maybe erected /our different ways ; viz. 
by a celestial gplobe, by the zodiacal planisphere, by trig-ono- 
metrical calcalations, or by'' TcMes o/Hotuea," calcnlated for 
the pole or latitude of birth. These are perpetual ; and the 
latter method, which uses these tables, being by far the most 
easy of the whole, (especially to those who dislike laborious 
calculations,) we shall adopt it in the present instance. 

The Astronomical day begins at noonf and hence, it must 
be remembered that when a figure is cast for any given time, 
the hours and minutes must be accounted from the noon pre^ 
ceding the birth ; thus, were a figure of the heavens to be cal- 
culated for 8 o'clock in the morning, the true way of expressing 
it Astrologically, would be 20 hours P. M. or after noon, ac- 
counting from the noon of the preceding day ; and thus in all 
ether cases, or schemes of the like nature whatever. 



ART OF CASTING FIGURES. Ui 

Id dMStkig^ (or erefeting) a figure of fbe heaT^Mis, which ii 
also termed '^a/lcrro^eope;^' the first thing* to he done, is t6 
find the right (Ueensi&n of the Sun, in hours and minMtes,foP 
the noon <f that day on which it is erected. This in cases of 
great correctness must be done by referring to an Bphemeris, 
of which White's is the best^ fbr that year, wherein the Sun's 
true IcmgitadlDal place in the zodiac is found in the second co- 
Iflinn, headed '* 0'« longitude** and by referring to the '' Tables 
of Houses" in that column, which has marked over the top the 
Sun in the same sign, as found in the Ephemeris ; in the co- 
lumn to the left hand side, headed '' time from noon," will be 
found a certain number of hours and minutes, whidi invariably 
are to be added to the hour and minute of the day for which 
the %ure is erected. When the result exceeds twenty-four 
hours, that number is to be subtracted therefromr ; and with 
the remainder again seek in the column of the Tables of Houses, 
headed '' Inne from noon," wherein having found the number you 
sought, (or the nearest to it,) on a line with that number will 
be found the degrees and minutes of the celestial signs, that 
should occupy the first six houses of heaven ; namely, the 1st, 
toA, 8rd, 10th, 1 1th, and 12th lK>uses. The opposite houses to 
these (which are always the same) are. 



Houses, 


Opposite, 


Signs, 


opposite. 


10th 


4th 


r 


£U 


11th 


5th 





m 


12th 


6th 


n 


t 


tst 


7th 


s 


Yf 


%nd 


8th 


a 




Srd 


9th 


^ 


X 



As the first six houses are opposite to the last six, so the same 
degrees and minutes of the opposite signs, or constellations, 
(which were given in a former part of this work, but which 
we have repeated) must occupy the cusps of the opposite ce- 
lestial houses. 

In order to evade the difficulty of procuring an Ephemeris 
for the year of birth, whereby many persons are entirely igno- 
rant even of the sign under which they are born, or which in 



120 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

other yfOTd$, arose in the first house at the time of their birth, 
the author has inserted a Perpetual Table of the Sun's right 
ascension for every day in the year ; which^ in all cases where 
an Ephemeris cannot be obtained, may be resorted to, and the 
horoscope of a nativity cast thereby with accuracy quite suffi- 
cient for ordinary purposes, where the person is not so certain 
as to the exact minute of their birth. Hitherto no author has 
given this desideratum, and we will now give an example of 
casting a figure by the 

Perfetual Table of the Sun's right ascensian. 

As this table is calculated to answer an Astrological mecm 
(or average) for every year, either past, present or future ; 
having acquired the day of birth, the student must enter the 
table in that column answering to the day and m&nih required, 
overhead of which is a certain number of hours, minutes, and 
seconds, marked '' h. m. s." being the number answering to the 
Sun's right ascension on the noon of that day ; let him take 
out these, and thereto add the hours and minutes of the pre- 
ceding noon, of the time to which he sets the figure. — ^This 
being done, the sfum in hours and minutes must next be found 
in the Table of Houses, as before described ; in a line with 
which are the requisite signs and degrees of each house in the 
theme or figure; 

Example, 

Let it be required to cast the figure for the nativity of a 
child, bom April ]7th, 1824, llh.43m. in the morning ; mean- 
time. As before observed, we enter the table of the Sun's right 
ascension for the 1 6th day of April at noon, and level therewith 

we find 

t 

A. in* 

Thei Sun's R. A. - - - 1 .. 38 

, To this add the hours and minutes from noon 23 . . 43 



25 .. 21 
From which take - - - 24 .. 



The remainder is - - - - . 1 .. 21 



\ 



ART ar' CASTING" FIGURES. 121 

Or Y hoar 21 miiiutes. N6xt; seek this in the'Tables of Houses, 

htknng '^timefrofd fwon*' at top, and opposite to; the right hand 

of H. M." 1 • . 21 , there is the number 22, and by looking* at the 

'10 
head of the column there is on the head thereof, which de- 

« 

notes that twenty-two degrees of r are on the cusp of tfao 
tenth house. In the next column there is the number 2, and 
two lines above it the sign u, on the top of which column is 

the number , which shows that two degrees of n are on the 

cusp of the eleventh house (n having succeeded o) ; in the 
next column there is found the number 10, and by looking at 

12 

the top of the column is found; which as s is seen ' suc- 
ceeding to n (by looking up the column) denotes that 10 deg. 
of s are on the ciisp' of 'the twelfth house. Pursuing th^ 

same tract, in the next column headed ^^^' ^e find H deg. 

12 min., and by looking up the column SI , will be found lower 
down (or succeeding) s, which shows us that 11 deg. 12 min. 
of SI is to be placed on the cusp of the Ascendant or first house. 
Next, the student will perceive 28 deg. of Q in the column 
headed 2, or the second house ; and lastly, on the third house, 
he will observe 21 deg. of tgj, 'in the column headed 3, which 
are found on the cusp of the third house. These are the whole 
of the six oriental houses ; and in order to find the signs and 
degrees on the cusps of the opposite, or occidental houses, the 
student must again refer to the foregoing pages, wheie they 
are set down : thus he will find, that the fourth house being 
opposite to the tenth, and £!: opposite to t, there must conse- 
quently be 22 deg. of £^ placed on the cusp of the fourth house. 
Likewise the fifth house being bpposite to the eleventh, and f 
opposed to n 9 there must be placed 2 deg. of ^ on the cusp of 
the fifth house. Again, the twelfth house is the opposite to the 
sixth, and Vf is opposite to s , consequently 10 deg. of yf must 
occupy the cusp of the sixth house. Also the opposite house to 
the ascendant or first, is the seventh house, and ;r: is opposed to 
SI , therefore 1 1 deg. 1 2 min. of t::: must descend with the cusp of 
the seventh house. On the second house we have 28 deg. of 



in 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



H and xt, ttill b#io^ opposite to that iign, S8 deg. of as aast 
oeeupy the coip oC the eighth heoite; Lastly, the thhd house 
and the ninth hooM are opposite td each other, sd are 19 and 
H ; therefore by the same formilla^as we have 21 deg. of tig 
on the cusp of the third house, 21 deg. of K mast take station 
on that of the ninth ; by which means, and by a very simple 
process, the whole theme of heaven, or figure of the nativity, 

IS formed and erected. 

« 

This constitutes what is tbrmed the Radian or groundwork of 
Astrologers, whereon they build their judgments ; and we 
should presume that the foregoing example, which will hold 
good in all cases, is sufSciently plain, for even the casual reader 
of this " Mannar' to cast the Hotowcope or figure off their birthi 
provided the true day and hour thereof is known. 

The following, is a view of the figure. 




AST or CASTING FIGUmiS. 123 



EXPLANATION OF WHITE'S EPHEM ERIS. 



«« If dte aHtlBr be bwllj, and Ac mmt fiei 
ID it, anil Hick wftm it 



In former tines the calculitioii of a nativity was eiteened a 
veiydifllcolt process, sioee the Astrologer was either obliged to 
take an aetoal ofaaerratioD of the heavenly bodies horn some 
place where he eoold well peroeire them; or in latter times, at 
the least, to calcolate their elements from those Astronomical 
tables, whidi oonstitnte the basis of our Bphemeris. The tedi- 
oosness of snch pnrsuts may be compantiTely gnessed at, when 
it is stated on the anthority of a celebrated modem writer, " that 
Kepl«, (who was a clever Astrologer) in calculating only ten 
oppositions of 1; and ^ , filled a large /o2tb volume with the re- 
quisite figures :*' and even at the present day, several hours at- 
tention are requisite for the calculations (of the ten equations) 
requisite to the ]) 's place. But by an Ephemeris, the best of 
which is that of White, (published annually) the places of 
every planet may be found in a few minutes only ; a most ex- 
cellent consideration for our modem Astronomers, who%ene- 
rally dislike "laborious computations," and have taken the 
liberty to decry and vilify Astrology, as '' a dry study" in con- 
seqoence, which is by no means the case ; rather let it be 
thought (which it can be proved) that the only dryness in the 
science, is in dealing with stubborn and inflexible incredulists, 
who first assume a set of principles utterly fallacious, and then, 
like ingenious sophists, " reason in a circle," till reason itself 
is either extinct, or entirely left out of the question. 

We subjoin a copy of the Ephemeris. 



124 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



COPY OF AN EPHEMERIS. 





Used in Astrological Observations. 


(AprU 1824.) 


. . 


M 


0'8 0*8 semi. 


LUNATIONS. 

First quarter^ 6th day, lOh. 18m. aftern. 


D 


semidiam pass.mer. 


1 


16' 1" 1 


lm4s*2 


Full Moon, 13th day, 3h. 47m. aftern. 


7 


15 59 -5 


14-4 


Last quarter, 21 st day, 6h. 10m. morn. 
New Moon, 89th day, 4h. 25m. morn. 


13 


15 57 -9 


14-6 


19 15 56. '3,* 


14-9 




25 


15 54 -71 


15-3 


M Sund. & other 


©rises 


Clock 


O's 


(Ts 


^ riseG 


i 


y« 


D 
1 


remark, days 


&sets 


bef. O 


dedin. 


declin. 


& sets 


south. 


horpar 


s • * 


6 38 7 


3' 55*^ 


4°n38' 


17"nl4' 


9a]3| Ia20|d6^ 25" 


2 




5 31.7 


3 37 


5 1 


20 56 


10. 28 


2 11 


56 55 


3 


Rich. Bp. Chi. 
5S.inLe. St. 


5 29 7 


3 19 


5 24 


23 36 


11 40 


3 657 24 


4 


5 27 7 


3 1 


5 47 


24 58 


morn. 


4 357 54 


5 
6 


[[Ambrose. 


6 26 7 


2 44 


6 10 


24 52 


44 
1. 36 


5 S 


158 23 
58 51 


Old Lady Day. 

^ so. 3 34 aft. 


5 23 7 


2 26 


6 .33 


23 14 


6. 1 


7 


5 21 7 


2 8 


6.55 


20 9 


2 14 


6 58 


159 16 


8 


x' dec. 23 n 45. 
Camb.T.end8. 


5 19 7 


1 51 


7 18 


15 51 


2 46 


7 53 


159 37 


9 


5 17 7 


1 34 


7 40 


10. 36 


3 9 


8 46 


»59 50 


10 
U 


Oxf. T. ends. 


5 15 7 


1 18 


8 2. 


4 44 


3 31 


9 37 


'59 54 


5 or Palm Sun. 


5 13 7 


1 1 


8 24 


1623 


3 50 


10 27 


59 48 


12 




5 12 7 


45 


8 46 


7 24 


4 8 


11 18 


59 29 


13 




5 10 7 


29 


9. 8 


12 57 


rises 


mcum. 


58 59 


14 


* 


5 8 7 


14 


9 30 


17. 43 


8a40 


.10 


58 21 


15 
16 


Maunday Th. 


5 6 7 


Oaft.2 


9 51 


21 24 


9 56 


1 4 


57 37 


QAod Friday. 


5 4 7 


16 


10 12 


23 51 


11 6 


1 58 


56 5(# 


17 


4 ■ 


5 2 7 


31 


10 33 


24- 67 


mom. 


2 63 


56 6 


18 


Easter Hay. 5 7 


45 


10 54 


24. 43 


5 


3 47 


55 25 


iS 


Easter Mon. Alphe^e. 


59 


11 15 


23 17 


50 


4 40 


54 52 


20 
21 


Easter Tues. 


4 56 8 


I 12 


11 36 


20 48 


1 26 


5 29 


54 28 


* 


4 55 8 


I 25 


11 56 


17 28 


1 53 


6 16 


54 14 


22 


Cd. k. 


4.53 8 


1 37 


12 16 


13 28 


2 14 


7 


54 U. 


23 


St. Geo. K. b. 


4 51 8 


1 49 


12 36 


8 56 


2 31 


7 43 


54 18 


24 




4 49 8 


2 


12 56 


4 2 


2 48 


8 24 


54 34 


26 


Low Sund. St. Mark. 


2 11 


13 16 


in 4 


3 3 


9 6 


!54 58 


26 


CDs. ofGicb. 4.46 8 


2 21 


13 35 


« . 14 3 18 


9 48 


55 28 


27 




4 44 8 


2,31 


13 54 


11 15 3 34 


10 33 


56 2 


28 


Oxf. & Cam. 


4 42 8 


2 40 


14 13 


15 53' 3 53 


11 20 


56 38 


29 


TTerm b. 


4 40 8 


2 49 


14 32 


19 51 


sets. 


0911 


57 12 


30 




4 38 8 


2 58 


14 51 


22 51 


9a33 


1 5 


57 45 


M 


Day 


lenffth 
of day 


Helioc 


HeUoc 


HeUoc 


Helioc Helioc 


Helioc 


h 


D 
1 


mcrea. 


long.F^ 


long.lf 
13JUS59 


long (J 


long01ong. $ 


long. 5 


sets 


5 10 


12 64 


25b 31 


7ii:48 


11:1^:4325)^42 


0K56 


10a 5 


7 


6 34 


13 18 


25 44 


14 29 


10 32 


17 37 5J11 


27 


9 48 


13 


6 56 


13 40 


25 58 


14 59 


13 16 


23 30J4 40 


28T13 


9 30 


19 


6 20 


14 4 


26 It 


15 29 


16 2,29 21:24 10 


4U16 


9 11 


25 


6 42 


14 20 


•26 24 


15 59 


18 48' 5THIII B»:40 11QJ)53 


8 53 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



125 



COPY OF AN EPHEMERIS. 
Used in Astrological Observations. {April 1824.) 



M 


daylig. 


O'sh. 


Logar. 


Pi. J's 
node 


h 


^B 


V's 


6 


•s 


?'s 


J's 


D 

1 


be^i^ 


motion 


distan. 


lat. 


lat. 


lat. 


lat. 


lat. 


3 33 


2'27-"8 


000123 


141^15 


li 


9 56 


On 7 


3n 4 


1 


8 10 


26 


7 


3 17 


227- 3 


000855 


13 66 


1 


55 


8 


2 


51 


1 


21 


1 25 


Id 


3 2 


226- 7 


001580 


13 37 


1 


54 


8 


2 


36 


1 


29 


32 


19 


2 47 


.226- 2 


002307 


13 18 


I 


53 


9 


2 


20 


1 


34 


0n32 


25 


2 26 


225* 8 


003016 


12 69 


1 


52 


9 


2 


4 


1 


37 


I a3 


M 


C 


)'8 


D's 


ys 


b's 


rs 


Cf'8 


?'8 


5*s 


D 


longi 


tude 


long. 


lat. 


long. 


long. 


long. 

l=-:40 


long. 


long. 
0T39 


1 


Til** 


42' 55" 


3b51 


4n43 


21b 29 


3az) 1 


10K44 


2 


12 


42 


16 55 


4 12 


21 


35 


3 7 


1 


18 


11 


57 


3 32 


d 


13 


41 4 


onii 


3 28 


21 


42 


3 14 





56 


13 


10 


5 26 


4 


14 


40 5 


13 38 


2 32 


21 


48 


3 21 





34 


14 


23 


6 21 


5 


15 


39 4 


27 16 


1 26 


21 


55 


3 28 





13 


15 


35 


8 18 


6 


16 


38 


ilao4 


14 


22 


2 


3 35|29n]^52 


16 


48 


10 16 


7 


17 


36 54 


25 4 


Is 


22 


9 


3 42i29 


31 


18 


1 


12 16 


8 


18 


35 46 


9^7,16 


2 11 


22 


16 


3 49 


28 


•11 


19 


14 


14 17 


9 


19 


34 35 


23 38 


3 15 


22 


23 


3 56 


28 


51 


20 


27 


16 19 


10 


20 


33 22 


8IT5 7 


4 6 


22 


30 


4 4 


28 


32 


21 


40 


18 23 


n 


21 


32 7 


22 38 


4 42 


22 


37 


4 12 


38 


14 


22 


53|20- 28 


12 


22 


30 49 


7€i: 7 


4 59 


22 


44 


4 20 


27 


56 


24 


622 33 


13 


23 


29 30 


21 25 


4 58 


22 


51 


4 28 


27 


39 


25 


1924 39 


14 


24 


28 8 


5n\27 


4 38 


22 


56 


4 36 


27 


22 


26 


3226 46 


15 
16 


25 


26 45 


19 8 


4 3 


23 


6 


4 44 


27 


6 


27 


45 


28 53 


26 


25 20 


2^25 


3 16 


23 


13 


4 53 


26 


51 


28 


58 


lJt5 


17 


27 


23 52 


15 19 


2 18 


23 


20 


5 2 


26 


37 


OTll 


3 7 


18 


28 


22 25 


27 51 


1 16 


23 


28 


5 10 


26 


23 


1 


24 


5 14 


19 


29 


20 54 


lOV^ 4 


12 


23 


35 


5 19 


26 


10 


2 


37 


7 20 


21 


b 


19 23 


22 4 


0n25 


23 


42 


5 28 


25 


58 


3 


50 


9 26 


1 


17 49 


3';a56 


1 52 


23 


50 5 37 


25 


47 


5 


3 


11 29 


22 


2 


16 14 


15 45 


2 46 


23 


57 5 46 


25 


36 


6 


16 


13 31 


23 


3 


14 38 


27 36 


3 36 


24 


5 


5 55 


25 


25 


7 


29 


15 31 


24 


4 


13 


9K34 


4 16 


24 


12 


6 4 


25 


16 


8 


42 


17 29 


25 


5 


11 21 


21 44 


4 44 


24 


19 


6 14 


25 


8 


9 


55 


19 25 


26 


6 


9 40 


4T 8 


5 


24 


26 


6 23 


25 


1 


11 


8 


21 18 


27 


7 


7 57 


16 48 


5 2 


24 


34 


6 33 


24 


54 


12 


22 


23 8 


28 


8 


6 13 


29 45 


4 48 


24 


41 


6 43 


24 


48 


13 


35 


24 54 


29 


9 


4 27 


12b59 


4 19 


24 


49 


6 53 


24 


43 


14 


48 


26 38 


30 
M 


10 


2 39 


26 26 


3 35 


24 


57 


7 3 


24 


39 


16 


1 


28 17 


V 


i 


? 


<? 


b' 


's 


■U's 


c? 


's 


9' 


's 


9'8 


D 

1 


aets 


. sets 


rises 


nses 


declin-l^ 


dedin. 


dedin. 


dedin.| 


dedin. 


liii50 


,5m44 


4m47 


5m27 


160 


Ll8 


23n33 


2n 


. 9 


8s 


38 


1835 


7 


1 32 


5 18 


4 40 


5 20 


16 


29 


23 33 


2 


48 


5 


59 


3n34 


13 


1 13 


4 52 


4 31 


sets- 


16 


40 


23 32 


3 


19 


3 


13 


9 4 i 


19 


54 


4 26 


4 21 


7a50 


16 


52 


23 30 


3 


40 





24 


14 28 


251 


35 


4 


4 11 


8 42 


17 


4 


23 28 


3 


50 


2n 


27 


19 6 



IM A MANUAL OF ASTftOLOGT. 

DIRECTIONS 

FOR 

placing tie ^Xmttn tn t|e f^oroiScope. 



Ih the right hand page of " White's Ephemeris/' the exact 
copy of which we hare giren, as the best mode of ezplanatioD, 
the student will observe that the trae places of the diflereDt 
planets are calcalated to each day throngrhont the month at noon, 
or 12 o'clock in the day. Conseqneotlyy when a " theme of 
heaven'' is erected precisely for noonday, their places in the 
Ephemeris are to be taken oot without any calcalation. Bat 
as the heavens and heavenly bodies are in perpetual motion, it 
is obvions that if their places in the Ephemeris are calculated 
for a given honr of the day (which in this instance is always 
made for noon) to be correct, the proportional distance eath 
planet has moved since that period, must be adcled to, or sub- 
tracted from the given time, according as they may be best taken 
from the preceding or succeeding noon. 

In the foregoing scheme of nativity, which is set for April 
IT, 1824, llh. 43ra. morning, or seventeen minutes before noon 
of that day ; we find, that on that day ai noon, the Q is in 
270 23' 62" Tf (see the second column headed Q's longitude) 
or rejecting the seconds, in 27^ 24', and as the figure is set 
before noon, we find the Q's diurnal motion, by subtracting 
his place on the 16th day from the 17th to be &S^ 32" which in 
every case, where the seconds exceed thirty, may be counted 
as a nuDUte instead ; we will therefore take his diurnal motion 
as 59 minutes, which divided by 24 (the Astronomical hours 
accounting from noon to noon) gives about 2' 30" for every 
hour of his motion through the sign he is in, and consequeptly 
we subtract about 40 secopds for the motion of the 17 minutes 
in time which the figure wants of noon, which taken from his 
place in the Ephemeris, leaves the 0's true place in the hea* 
vens, viz. 27 • •^ T . Having thus found his place equated to 
the hour of birtb> the student mast next refer to ih^J^re, and 
place the planet therein, either near to, or far from that hovse 



CALCULATIONS BT THE EPHEMERIS. 127 

df heayen whidi has the aigpn the planet is in on its cosp ; thus 
in the pTeseBtinstaace, on the tenth hoBse we observe t22^ (y, 
and consequently the O is in that hoase, where we place bim» 
and not far from the cusp, as he is within fire degrees thereof 
in the zodiac. 

In the third colomn of the Ephemeris is found the D 's true 
longitude, which at noon, on the 17th April, is 15^ 19' ^ , and 
by subtracting' her place on the 16th from her place on thel 7th 
day, thus, 

D on the 17th day at noon 15^ 19' / 

i on the 16th do. - - 2 25 



12 54^ 



Shows us that in the twenty-four hours her motion in longitude 
was 12^ 54', which is about thirty-two minutes per hour; con- 
sequently we have eight minutes longitude to subtract from 
her place at noonday, (the equation for the seventeen minutes 
which the figure is set before noon) and this gives her true 
place in the horoscope, viz. 15^ 11'^ ; and by reference to the 
scheme, we place the D in the fifth house (as that sign is on the 
cusp thereof,) and with the degrees and minutes before found, 
not far from the cusp of the house in question, her distance 
therefrom being about eight degrees. 

In the fifth column of the Ephemeris is found the place of T; > 
which by the same mode of calculation is found to be 23^ 20' ; 
and as the sign ^ is intercepted (in the figure) between the 
tenth and eleventh houses. We place him in the«middle of the 
tenth house. In the next columns we have the places at noon 
of 11, it $ , and $ , which by the very same process are found 
to be, % in 5^ I's ; <J 26^ 37't5? ; ? 0® 9'r ; and J 3® 5'o ; 
accordingly we find what houses in the horoscope they should 
occupy, and place them accordingly. These are the whole of 
the planetary places except ^, and his place is found in another 
part of the Ephemeris (on account of his extraordioary slow 
motion) page 32 ; and in the present instance ^ is in 15^ 45'Vf , 
we place him therefore in the sixth house of the horoscope, as 
that house has yf on the cusp. 



128 A MANUAL OF ASTHOLOGY. . 

The next thing usually taught by Astrologers is to plaee...the 
Moon's nodes, or the dragon's head aiid tail in the horoscope. 
In the fifth column of the Ephemeris, *' PI. ]) 's node" is miark-. 
ed, which is the place of the! north npde or dragon's head, the 
opposite to which is the dragon's <af7« these are calculated in the 
same way as all the planets ; but as these points^together with the 
, are by the author of this work deemed as useless superfluities, 
the relics of the superstitious absurdities of the dark ages, (in- 
vented probably to serve the vacuum in the art, created by the, 
non-discovery of ]^) and can be dispensed with; the author 
deems it irrelevant to his present system of starry s.cience, to 
intrude on the reader's time and patience by a. useless and 
unintelligible array of words and signs without meaning. — ^The 
figure is therefore complete, except placing therein the principal 
fixed stars which fall near the ecliptic ; and consequently are 
presumed to have certain influences in nativities (or genitures,) 
according as they may be found unthinfive degrees of the cusp, 
of any house, or within, five degrees of the place of any planet 
in the scheme. 

The table subjoined contains a true calculation of their places 
in the heavens, up to the year 1828, with their different mag-, 
nitudes and natures, according to the cleverest authors. 

<' VII not b«lieve tliat the Arch-Architect 
With aU these fires the heavenly arches deck'd 
Only for th4nvf and with these glittering shields 
To amaze poor shepherds watching in the fields. 
m wit believe that the least flower which pranks 
Our garden borders, or our common banks, 
And the least stone that in her wamine lap 
Our mother £arth doth covetously wrap, 
Hath some peculiar virtue of its own, 
And tfwi the stars of heaven have none /'' 

Du BAmTAS* 



EFFECTS OF THE FIXED STARS. 



129 



A TABLE 



OF THE 



0104% <$m(nem ^iftt> ^tax&, 

With their various effects, according to Authors, 



Names 



South end of the Whale 
Andromeda's Head • • • • 
Whale's Belly 



MiRAGH . • 

Ram's Horn 



Almach •••••••• •••••• 

Whale's Jaw. Menkar 

Caput Algol Medusa 



The Pleiades 

Occulus Taarus 
Aldebaran.. • 



RiGEL (In Orion) .... 
Bellatrix (In Orion) 
Capell A • • • 



Boll's North horn . . . . 
Orion's belt (1st Star) 

Orion's head 

tin the Bull's horn. • .. 

Orion's belt (2nd star) 

Betelgubse (Orion's 

shoulder) •• 

Propus 



a 

be 

■•« 

CO 



r 
r 

T 
T 








n 
n 

n 
n 

n 

n 
n 
n 
n 

n 



•c 

M. 

OB 

a 



« 

9 

*» 

•»• 

a 



v. 
9 



•o / 

1.. 4 

12. • 0^2 

16. .37 4 

28.. 12 

6. .14 2 

11. .46 2 

11--53 2 

23.. 46 
2Q..48 

6.. 4 3 
7. .24 1 

14..24 1 
18. .32 2 
19. .26 2 



20.. 10 
21. .50 
21* -26 
22.. 23 

22-. 54 



2 
2 

[4 
3 



n26..20 

n i28 . . 30 
I 



1 
4 



? 

? 
V 

? 

c? 

cf 
Vc? 

c?? 
c? 



Good -or evil eifecti. 



Unfortunate. 

Hondr and riches. 

Unfortunate, and giving 
falls and blows. 

Renown, and prosperity 
in marriage. 

Dangerous and evQ, de- 
noting bodily hurts. 

Honor and eminent 

friends amongst females. 

Sickness, disgrace, and 
ilUfortune, with dan- 
ger from great beasts. 

The most unfortunate, 
violent, and dangerous 
star in die heavens. 

Eminent stars, but de- 
noting accidents to tlie 
sight, or blindness. 

Fortunate. 

An eminent star: pro- 

• duces riches, martial 

or public honors, and 

. publicity. 

Honors, renown, and 

splendour. 
M.iHtary or civic honors,' 

and wealth. 
Honors, eminence, re- 
nown, publicity, wetilth, 
and eminent friends. 
Fortunate and eminent 

Good fortune. 
Unfortunate. 

A mischievous star in 
influence. • 

Public honors but fleet- 
ing. 

Martial honors, prefer- 
ment and wealth. 
Eminence in life. 



130 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



Names 



Right should, of Aariga 
Bright foot of Gemiofi 

SlRIDS 

Castor 




Pollux 
Procyon 



Prcesepe 



North Assellas > 
South Assellas ) 



Heart of Hydra 
Rbgulvs • . . . 
Vindemiatrix • . 
DorsaLeoBis .. 



Deneb 



Crater 

Arotcrvs ......... 

The Virgin's Spike I 
Arista , ) 
South Scale 



North Scale •••• 
HandofOphincus 
Frons Scorpio.... 
Knee of Ophincas 

Amtarss 

Tm Eaglb 



• • . 



C^nicom's Tail 

flHABAUT • 



Fegasi 



Good or cvfl «lAeU> 



S20 
S23 



St 
SI 

a 
19? 



4 
4 

6 

19 
27 

7 

8 
19 



1521 

i2:21 

Ta|i2 
in. 16 

Tit '29 



t 

t 

t 

Yf 



^ 




6 

.7 

29 

21 

1 



Xj21 



52 


54 



38 
19 



36 
26 
31 
49 

10 

6 
49 

26 
41 

47 

541 

47 
48 
22 
20 

8 
25 

4 
21 



2 
1 



4 

4 

2 
1 
3 
2 



4 
1 

1 

2 

2 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 

3 

I 

2 

2 






<? 
?<? 

^ ? 



Oreat publicilj and 

tivity. 
Eminence in tfie polite 

arts. 
Glory and leoown, or 

great wealth. 
Mischievous and prone 

toTiolence. 

Renown and eminence. 

Wealth, fame, and for- 
tune. 

Misdiievonsy threatens 
blindness. 

These stars are said to be 
of a biuning nature, 
and to have great in> 
dications of a Tiolent 
death, or of violent and 
severe accidents by fire. 

Trouble through women 
and Hl'fortun& 

Glory, wealth, and great 
honors. 

Mischievous and unfiDr- 
tunate. 

Unfortunate,causing un« 
' happiness of mind and 
melancholy, or fear of 
poison. 

Unfortunate, and pub* 
lidy dJagracefiil. 

Eminence. 

Riches and honon. 



Riches, renown, and 
eminence. 

Unfortunates danger of 
poison. 

Eminently fortunate. 

Evil, in influence. 

Unfortunate. 

Eminent but wasteful. 
Activity and eminence. 

Mischievous, danger 

from reptiles. 
Unfortunate, danger 

from beasts. 
Eminently fortunate and 

powerful 
Danger by violent stabsy 

cuts or fire. 
Danger from water. 



EFFECTS OF THE FIXED STARS. 



131 



In the foregoing table we have given the various significa- 
tions of the fixed stars^ according to the best authors ; who, as 
well as several modern Astrologers of eminence, attribute great 
virtue and efficacy to their configurations, with the active or 
l>assiye significators* A skilful amateur in the science, supposes 
their influence to contribute more particularly to the destinies 
of kingdoms and nations, than to individual fate. — The fixed 
stars increase their longitude every year about 50^ Thus 
moving through one degree of the zodiac in seventy-two years, 
and are two thousand one hundred an4 sixty y^rs- in passing 
through one sign in the heavens, which, doubtless, may naturally 
be expected to cause important revolutions, and manifest changes 
in terrestrial affairs. 

Having placed the " fixed stars" in the haroacope by the fore- 
going rules, the reader will observe the whole process at one 
Tiew as underneath, for which purpose we give the figure. 




132 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOOT. 



THE 

ESSENTIAL FORTITUDES AND DEBILITIES 

As to Nature, Sign, and Aspect. 

<* Anodnr dereneaK is of the Smme^ anoAir deienene of the Moone, ind ano- 
thfar cleicnesw of theStenee» and a Stem diJMth from a Sterre m dereness.** 

WiCLiF. 1 Cor. 15. 

IN order to understand the following table, it must be ob- 
served, that the ancients attributed certain signs of the zodiac, 
as houses, to each of the seven planets, which is shown in the 
second column of the table, where ^ is placed, denoting his 
house to be in the sign r* The next column contains the de- 
gree of their exaltaiwn, which for the is found to be in 1^ 
T. Next to this are shown the Triplieities, over which is 
marked "D. N/' denoting that r is the Triplicitj of Q by 
day, and 1/ by night. Adjoining this are the signs wherein 
the planets were said to have their terms, and next to that their 
celestial phases. These constituted the whole of the essential 
dignities or fortitudes, according to the ancient system; in which 
the Orientals and Europeans agree together, except that the 
Persian Astrologers term the Houses of the Planets " Towers;**- 
a reference to which seems to have been also made in the 
sacred scriptures, where we read (in that beautiful poetic ima- 
gery for which those writings are so unparalleled) of " a strong 
tower," a " tower of might," &c. Thus also Shakspeare, the 
poet of nature, *' the king's name is a tower of strength," and 
frequent allusions are made thereto by the oriental writers in 
all ages ; which the attentive reader will readily observe. But 
as the recent discovery of Herschel, the stupendous planet has 
thrown new lights upon the science of the stars, it could never 
have been expected that the ancients should have been perfect 
in every part of their system ; and therefore a blind obedience 



A MANUAL OF ASTftOLOGT. 



1S3 



2 «^ 






5 

S3 



s 

3 



6 







1 




1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 






5 


X 


il 


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-*♦ 


^ i> >3 ^ Q n 


a 


S 


f 




^ 


•3* 


?:e 


o* 


■lO 


f 
KX0 


■^ 

^ 


KX -K) 


o» 


|fi 


id 

•a 


10 


C8 

00 




10 


-KX ii 


83 
00 


00 





m 






40 









•♦O 







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-KX 


-K) 







«K> 


^ 


40 


ii 


o* 


wr 


■KX 


^ 


o* 


■KX 


•lO 


4:^ 




OD 


O 


G» 


X 


o 


A 


^ 


O 


o 


•vt 


OD 


A 




45f 


■KX 


^a 


•K> 


45f 


40 


-K) 


■KX 


42f 


^ 


■KX 


40 


- 


fa 


lO 


!^ 


i^ 


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00 


S 


00 


^ 


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KX 


40 


|:e 


■KX 


-K) 


-I^i 


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-lO 


"KX 


•K> 


*:i 


■KX 


o 


o 


fO 


O 


M 


(o 


00 


ta 


to 

o 


10 


1(0 
to 


M 


8" 
1 


o* 


•l^i 


cx* 


~T 


■KX 


■KX 


^ 


^ 


40 


•3* 


•3* 


o* 


»0 
Ok 


10 


)0 


)0 


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(0 




)6 


to 


C7« 


Ok 


Si 


-3* 


o* 


ror 


o* 


^ 


o* 


o* 


o* 


^ 


Oil 


o* 


00 

O 


00 

o 


00 

o 


00 

o 


00 

o 


00 

o 


00 

o 


00 

O 


§ 


00 

o 


§ 


00 

o 




^ 


•K) 


45f 


KX 


1^ 


^ 







40 


■ft! 


40 




s 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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i:^ 


■KX 


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>:T 


40 


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134 A MANUA>L QF ASTROLOGY. -. 

to every rule they laid 4own, woald be little shoi^t of bigotry 
and credulity. S t ilU itniustj bei acknowledge!^ ihat .tjhf ancients 
are entitled to our warmest gratitude, for the wonderful disco- 
• veries they made in the theory pf celestial linflueince ; and it 
would ill becQme the author pf thii^ worlj:, or his caqdid read- 
ers, to reject aught that they advanced, wi^ttt repeated proofs 
of its fallacy. . i ; < i . , 

We' have before observed that the placet ^orscfael was dis- 
Cjovered in consequence oifa pelebrated Astronomer, frequently 
observing an irregularity {in the motion of 3atprn ; that he. could 
not accpuni) for by tiny known- theory; of the heaveps. This 
being (he case, it wpuld npt^raUy be supppsed, that the an- 
cients in their obsecvatiops,! cpntinyaUyJfipiding certain effects 
ta follow, the 4(mse of which was unknown to them, would 
frequently attribute partial pffipcts to falli^cious causes, when- 
ever they found the known bepevolent influence of Jupiter im- 
peded in an unaccou^tajble way. Hence the th^eory of the 
" Ternois" and " Pljiases/' vrhich (he experience of, the present 
day leads us to r^'ec^r— as also the distinction between the day 
and ni^t housps of the planets ; i and the ^attributipg one sign 
to a planet byplay, and otip^^ by night, in the Triplicities, 
which evidently is a rplic of ancipnt superstition ; since reason 
itself must tell us, that if a, certain planet bears rule in. a cer- 
tain sign, (especially if posited therein) it must retaiin that rule, 
whether by day on. night. The author therefore rejects the 
d.istinctions of diurpal and pocturnal rule i;n Houses or Tripli" 
cities, as superfluous a,nd void of truth. . . 

The same objection may be made, although on different 
grounds, to thet theory of the Terms and Phases ; the author's 
present system .of the f' essential dignities^' therefore excludes 
these, as well as the precise degre^e of exaltatiop ; although he 
acknowledges the absolute truth of the ancient system, relative 
to the signs of heaven, wherein the planets have their fortitude 
or strength, by celestial '' House, Trigon, or Exaltation ;** and 
also of their consequent '' debility'' or weakness by the oppo- 
site signs, termed, their *' Detriment and Fall,'* The following 
table will best explain his theory, to the student or curious 
reader. 



FORTITUDES OF THE PLANETS 



135 



TABLE OF THE 



emmtiaX iFortttttHreif attDr mt^ilitit^ 



OF THE PLANETS: 



According to the Author^s System, 



ESSENTIAL FORTITUDES. 




ESSENTIAL DEBILITIES. 


^ 




t 






• 






1 


CdeHid 
Homei. 


5« 


Trij^dties. 




^2 


Detriment. 


FaU. 


»? 


W C5 


.n. 


Q% 


r ft ^ 




ffi a 


r 


V 


^ K 


S 








% 


n I* 


Vf 


<? 


r m 


Yf 


? J 


.13? Vf 




<? 


£t 


s 


o 


a 


r 











•MM 


./\. 


? 


^ 


K 


^? 


n ^ « 




? 


HI T 


15? 


V 


n TIP 


i5> 








i? 


1 K 


X 


]) 


s 





c? 


s m K 


- 


)> 


Vf 


m 



]^ is supposed to h^ve the same fortitqdes and debilities/ 

in all cases^ as T; . 



The above table will be readily understood by the student, 
and consequently requires but little explanation — The first 
column contains the planets ; the next^ the celestial houses , 
next to that, their exaltations ; and the last column (of their 
fortitudes) the Trigons or Triplicities, which they are found to 
govern. Of these dignities, the celestial House is the strongest 
of the whole, and is what Astrologers term the '' Lordship" 
or ** Ruler" of the sign, either on the cusp of the ascendant, or 
any other part of the figure ; next to this in power and strength^ 



13e A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

is the ExaltcUion ; and the third essential fortitude is the Ti*t- 
fdicity, in which respect the ancients were perfectly correct in 
their division of the zodiac after this manner ; and planets 
being found in these signs of heaven, are eminently strong, 
fortunate, and powerful; while their being in those signs, 
toarked as their debilities, viz. their Detriment and FaU, ren- 
ders them more peculiarly weak, evil, and unfortunate, than.in 
any other sign of the heiivens. 

The planetary orbs, in the course of their revolutions through 
the etherial fields of boundless space, are perpetually forming 
certain configurations or ctapects with each other, by which their 
influence is not only proportionally impeded or hastened, but 
powerful aspects of a benevolent nature are in all cases equal 
to the greatest essential dignity or /or^t^ttde ; and when malig- 
nant configurations intervene, such aspects render them* as weak, 
as when they are found in their essential debilities. These are in 
order, as follows : 

THE SEMISEXTILE. 

The Semieextile (for which as yet we have no Astronomical 
character) consists of one sign, or 30 degrees in the zodiac, or 
half the Sextile ; thus supposing ]{/[ to be in 4 degrees of r > 
and (J^ in 4 degrees of Q or }^ , these planets would be in exact 
Semisextile to each other. This aspect was unknown to the 
ancients ; but is found to be moderately fortunate and benefi* 
cial in influence. 

THE SEMIQUARTILE. 

The Semiquartile aspects consists of 45 degrees in the zo* 
diac, being one hcdf of the quartile or square ; thus if f; were 
posited in 18 degrees of ^ , and the Q in 3 degrees of s , these 
two planets are in semiquartile.to each other. Experience 
teaches us that this aspect is extremely. powerful in evil, and 
unfortunate in every respect whatever. 



ASPECTS OF THE' PLANETS. 137 

THE SEXTILE. 

The ^ aspect.coQsiste of 60 degrees, or two sigas of the 
zodiac, and is found to be very beneficial in influence, in most 
aspects equally powerful with the A- 

THE QUINTILE. 

The Qainiile aspect consists of 73 degrees in the zodiac; 
thus supposing a star to be in 15 degrees of rs2> and another in 
27 degrees of T > these two are in quintile aspect to each other. 
This configuration is found to be/dr(una<e in influence. 

THE QUARTILE. 

The D or Qaartile ray is 90 degrees, or one fourth part of 
the zodiac ; stars, in quartile to each other, are peculiarly evil, 
and no essential dignity can overcome the malignancy of such 
an hostile ray. 

THE TRINE. 

The A aspect consists of four signs, or 120 degrees in the 
zodiac, and is found to be peculiarly powerful in good fortune ; 
a benevolent trine of Jupiter in most cases is sufficiently strong 
to eradicate an evil position of Saturn. 

THE SESQUIQUADRATE. 

The Seaqaiquadrate ray is 135 degrees in the zodiac ; thus 
supposing a star to be in 15 degrees of Vf, and another in 
degrees of 15?, they are in sesquiquadrate to each other. This 
aspect is singularly wn/arfunflrfc, and equal in nearly all cases 
to the evil effects of the g . 

THE BI-QUINtlLE. 

' The Bi-quintile aspect consists of 144 degrees in the zodiac ; 
thus supposing <J to be in 24 degrees of n, and the ]) in 
18 degrees of ii\.. These planets are in bi-quintile ray to each 
other. It is found to produce /or^wnaie effects. 



138 A MANUAL OF ASTROL06T. 

THE OPPOSITION. 

The f aspect is dne half the zodiac, or six whole sig'DSyand 
is deemed by Astrologers as the most malignant of the whole ; 
it is peculiarly and eminently unfortunate. 

THE CONJUNCTION. 

The d , which although not properly an aspect, yet comes 
under the denomination of configurative rays, is when two pla- 
nets are in the same sign, degree, and minute of the zodiac. 
This aspect is deemed good with good planets, and evil with 
those of a contrary or. malignant nature, as the dictates of rea- 
son, even without experience, would lead us to judge. Its ef- 
fects are eminent and peculiar in all cases. 

THE ZODIACAL PARALLEL. 

The zodiacal parallel resembles the conjunction in effects, 
since it is formed when two planets have the same declination, 
(or in other words are equi'distant from the great circle of the 
equator) in number. Thus supposing a star or planet to be in 
5^X11 with 13® declination and another in 26^zSi, they would 
both be parallel to each other. In all cases, whether the sig- 
nificators are either active or passive, this aspect is equal to the 
conjunction. 

In the use of the foregoing aspects, the student must bear in 
mind, that the light planets apply only to the mote ponderous, 
and unless when retrogade, the superior never can apply by 
zodiacal aspect to the inferiors, the effect of which is very con- 
siderable both in genethliacal and horary Astrology ; for both 
reason and experience leads us to affirm, that if a certain force 
exists in any configuration of the stars, when that configuration 
ceaaes to exist the effects are no more ; and consequently, the 
more nearer the aspect the greater are the presumed effects, 
either in good or evil, which as the aspect approaches must be 
increasing in virtue, but as it goes off from the configurating 
ray, it gradually becomes weaker and weaker till the aspect is 



ASPECTS OF THE PLANET8. 139 

I entirely at an end. The following is found to be the oider of 

applieation. 

? 

Thus Herschel, who is placed at the top of the scheme, ap- 
plies to no planet whatever except when retrograde ; Satarn 
applies only to Herschel ; Jupiter, to Saturn and Herschel ; 
and so of the rest in order as above exemplified, where it will 
be seen that the moon,beingp last, applies to every other planet 
in the heavens ; but no planet to her aspect unless retrograde. 

The next thing to be observed and duly considered is the 
mundane aspects, or those formed by the diurnal motion of the 
earth round its axis, whereby every star is brought at stated 
periods to the cu«p of each house in due succession ; thus form- 
ing various aspects or configurations, as well with each other 
as with the angles of the ascending or descending horizon, the 
zenith, nadir, &c. The ancient Astrologers were either unac- 
quainted with these aspects, or forbore to mention them. Placidus, 
an Italian Astrologer, is the first who has given any definition 
of these configurations, which nevertheless are of greater im^ 
portance than any other part of the science. In order to ex- 
plain them at one view to the attentive student, the fallowing 
diagram is inserted, which will contain a complete exemplifi- 
cation of the mundane configurations or different aspects. 



140 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 




«4 



1^ 
^1 






^.1 






140 




GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



141 



THE 



DOCTRINE OF NATIVITIES; 



OR 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY, 

RBhATING TO THE PECULIAR DESTINY OF INDIVIDUALS, 

*' Descend from heav*n Ubaxia, by that name 

If ri^tly tfaou art call*d, whose voice divine 

Following, above the Olympian hill I soar, 

Above the flight of Fegasean wing. 

The meaning, not the name I call : for thou 

Nor of the Muses nine, nor on the top 

Of old Olympus dwell'st, but heavenly bom. 

Before the hills appear'd or fountains flowed 

Thou with eternal wisdom didst converse- 

Upled by thee, 

In the heav'n of heaven's I have presumed 

An earthly guest, and drawn empyreal air." 

MiLTOV. : . 



The science of foreknowledge, relating to indiTidaal/a/;e, ne- 
cessarily forms a leading feature in oar present work ; Xh^ basis 
of which has already been given in the descriptions and peculiari- 
ties of the signs, planets, and celestial houses, which the stu- 
ient must well and cautiously digest, and in a great measure 
^nrol them on the tablet of his memory, 'ere he turns his atten- 
ion to the " Doctrine of Nativities ;" the secrets of which the 
uthor will now proceed to develope, in a manner which he 
itters himself has been as yet unattempted ; and which will, if 
riously studied, carry conviction home to the breast of the un* 
3jad]ced enquirer.— The first thing necessary to be obaerved 
ter the'^cherae of nativity is erected) is concerning the 



142 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



Space of %iU* 

Ptolemy, an ancient and renowned Astrologer, in his Qua- 
dripartite, or four books on the influence of the stars, justly 
observes, *' of all events whatsoever, which take place after 
birth, the most essential is the continuance of life ; and as it is 
of course useless to consider> in cases wherein the life of a child 
does not extend to the period of one year, what other wants 
contingent on its birth might otherwise subsequently have hap- 
pened, the enquiry into the duration of life, takes precedent 
of all other questions. The discussion of this enquiry is by no 
means simple, nor easy of execution ; it is conducted in a di- 
versified process, by means of the governance of the ruling 
places. And the method now about to be laid down, seems, 
of all others, the most consonant with reason and with nature ! 
becausethe influence of the aphetical (or by legiacal) places, and 
the anarctic stars, perform the whole operation of regulating 
the duration of life.'' 

OF THE HYLEG, OR " GIVER OF LIFE," 
And the Prorogatory Places, 

The aphetic, or vital places in every horoscope, are in num- 
ber five, viz. the whole space of the flrat, seventh, ninth, and 
tefUh houses, computed by oblique ascension or descension, to 
reach five degrees preceding the cusp of each house, and 
twenty-fi V6 degrees beneath it : as also the half of the eleventh 
house, or the half of the stars semidiurnal are above the cusp 
€ff the horoscope. Consequently the " lord of life," as the 
Arabian Astrologers term the Hyleg, cannot be chosen when in 
either the' limits 'df the second, third, fourth^ fifth, sixth, or 
eighth houses, or in the &tit half of the eleventh house. • , 
' If the be in either of these places by day, he must bo eho-i 
sen in preference ta (M others, a«lhe planet who shall assume 
the important office of HyUg- {or aphetar) and if the birth be 
by nigki, tfa^si the ]) imust ;be ehosen ; bntif neither of these 



I GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 143 



I 



planets should be found in aphetical places, the horoscope or 
ascendant must be chosen as Hyleg. 

To determine the possibility of Life, the student (havingp se- 
lected the Hyleg) must well observe, whether it be strong and 
free from malignant configurations especially of Saturn, Mars, 
or Herschel ; for according to the strength and fortitude of the 
" Giver ci \i(e," so will be the radical constitution, and the 
concomitant effects^ If the Hyleg be much afQicted, the child 
will not survive its infant state. If afflicted by aspect, and at 
the same time assisted by powerfd rays, life will be in danger 
under operating directions, but may be preserved by extreme 
caation and peculiar medical aid. In all cases therefore the 
dutdtion of life is judged from the Hyleg, and when two pla- 
nets^ the oncl ]) (there cannot':be more) contend, by being 
both in proper places, for the Hylegiacal prerogative, both 
milst be chosen ; but the'' supreme'^ of the two, or that planet 
who claims the most essential dominion must be elected. as the 
most powerful. The ancients besides the luminaries, attributed 
thd same effects to the and planets haying dominion in the 
preceding lunations, but repeated experience warrants us in re- 
jecting that theory, and affirming that there can be no other 
ttyleg than what is before described. The Hyleg being chosen, 
and the probable length or shortness of life deduced from its 
position, or configurative rays, the next consideration will be of 
that planet to which is attributed the office 

OP THE ANARETA, OR " DESTROYER OF LIFE.'' 

' The Anaretic planets by nature are, ^ ,^, and 1^ ; but in 
particular cases the 0, D , and $ may be endowed with the 
same fatal influence, being variable according to the nature of 
the planet with which they are configurated or joined. The 
in particular is found to be a powerful Anareta whea the ]) 
is Hyleg, unless the benevolent rays of 7^ or $ assist in avert- 
ing his hostile influence. 

' To occasion death the Hyleg must be afflicted either by the 
conjunction or configurating evil rays ; of the Anaretical stars, 
and the distance between the significator (or Hyleg) and the 



144 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. ' 

aspect when mensured by the celestial arc of direction, and 
equated by a certain measure of time, which the experience of 
ag^es has determined for troth, will in every case point out, as 
with the finger of fate, the true and precise period of death. 

The manner and quality oi 6»hih, is also taken from the 
operating directions or celestial causes ; to which it must be re- 
membered that as in a vital nativity one configuration alone will 
seldom kill ; so when the benefic stars assist in the train, but 
are too weak in influence to 9ave life, they will assist in point- 
ing out the cause and manner of death. 

In these cases \ causes death by cold chronic, lingering dis- 
eases, such as ague, dropsy, flux, consumption, illiac passion, 
fear, melancholy; cough, asthma, rheumatism, disorders of the 
spleen, and all diseases proceeding from a superabundance of 
cold. 

% , joining his rays in the evil configuration, and being too 
weak at the time to save, causes death to proceed from disorders 
of the lungs, pleura, the morbid aflSections of the heart, spasms, 
pains in the head, and by all diseases which arise from defect in 
the organs of respiration, or defect in the wtd faculties. 

g causes mortality, by burning and rapid fevers, sudden and 
spontaneous wounds, disease of the kidneys, the stone or gravel, 
expectoration of blood and hoemorrhages of all kinds, erysi- 
pelas, measles, small pox, infectious diseases, abortion, miscar- 
riage, surgical operations ; and, in short, by ail hasty, acute, and 
violent choleric complaints., 

O when Anareta, is found to produce similar diseases to ^ , 
but not so violent ; and in this instance, the nature of the celes- 
tial «tgn he occupies is mudi to be considered. He denotes 
also dangerous fevers, affections of the eyes, and hot diseases. 

$ by joining in the train of killing configurations, causes 
death by disorders of the stomach and liver; as wasting or 
pining away, by scurvy, dysentery, fistula, use of improper me- 
dicine or poisonous drinks, and all diseases incident on super- 
abundant moisture and corraption. 

$ who, although a light planet, becomes a powerful signi- 
flcator when by aspect he is impregnated with Anaretic influ- 
ence ; causes de^th to proceed from disorders of the brain, me- 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 145 

lancholy, epilepsy, tits, insanity, coughs, and obstractions, as 
well as all diseases wherein the mind or intellect is affected. 

The T> by joining in the Anaretic rays, when she is not 
Hyleg, denotes a variety of diseases, chiefly proceeding from cold 
and moisture, and also disorders affecting the head, sight, brain, 
nerves, and at times apoplectic affections. 

SIGNS OF A VIOLENT DEATH. 

*' The very elefnents^ though each be meant 
The minitter of man, to serve his wants, 
Conspire against him. With his breath he draws 
'A plague into his blood ; and cannot use 
Life's necessary means, but he must 4ie.** 

COWPBR. 

In this respect the luminaries are generally much afSicted, 
either by the <^ , Q or ^ of T? ^ or Iji, while the Hyleg is at 
the Mme time replete with noxious influence. In this respect 
certain signs of the zodiac are found to be far more violent 
than others, whenever the Hyleg is found therein. The violent 
signs are T,^,,Vf, ^y wherein 1^ has the greatest significa- 
tion of death, ^^ of the cause thereof. The following fixed 
stars are also said to have great power therein, viz. Caput Algol 
in23« 26' , Occulus Taurus in 6° 4'n, Pollux in 20*^ 52' s, 
the right shoulder of Orion in 26^ 20'n , Cor Scorpio in 7® 22' f , 
and Pegasi in26^ 22'){. 

. If the be Hyleg, and ^2 square, or oppose him, from a 
fixed sign, he causes death by suffocation, hanging, or being 
crushed to^death ; if T^ aspect the luminaries in the above fatal 
manner from brutal signs T Q ^ Vf it denotes death by 
beasts, apdif $ aspect the Anaretic place, death often happens 
by female treachery or poison. If the aspect be from watery 
signs s TTi. or H > it threatens a violent death by drowning ; 
and Ptolemy adds, if the aspect be from some part near the con- 
stellation Argo, by shipwreck. 

If ^2 afflict the Q or ]) , (or the Hyleg) from cardinal signs 
it causes death by falls. Saturn, properly of his own nature, 

K 



146 A MANUAL OF ASTKOLOGT. 

denotes death by drownings, shipwreck, ruin of old building/ 
and poison. 

Fiery signs T Q, t ^^ indicatire of death by fire, thunder, 
lightning^, explosions, and gan-shots. 

Airy signs n ^ ss by falls from high places, beheading, 
strangling, or hanging. 

Watery signs s Tr(, K by drowning, fluids, or superabundant 
moisture. 

Earthy signs d ""P Vf by casualties, falls, and suffocation. 

Humane signs U ^ zst denotes death by human means, but 
still violent, when the luminaries are aflOlicted therein. 

The houses are also said to haye great power herein, thus. 

The tenth house generally (where violent deaths are indi- 
cated) denotes death by command of the magistrate. 

The twelfth house by private assassinations, horses or great 
beasts, and frequently perpetual imprisonment. 

The sixth house by servants or neighbours. 

If (? be joined to Y2 > ^^ effect is still more certain ; bat the 
peculiar nature of g is to cause accidents, and a violent termi- 
nation of existence by fire, iron, sharp weapons, gun-sbol 
wounds, explosions, combustibles, stroke of horses, falls and 
active violence. If (^ be in (^ O or ^ to the and Hyleg, 
from fixed signs, it threatens the native with murderer suicide ; 
if $ be joined with him, or with the aspect, it will partly hap« 
pen through women, and if ^ be thus configurated, by thieveSr 
If in mutilated signs, SI ^, ^, or with Caput Algol, it threat^ 
ens beheading ; if from the tenth or fourth house, or near Ce* 
pheus or Andromeda, it denotes hanging; if from the west 
angle, death by fire is threatened, but should it be in a qaadm-. 
pedian sign, it will happen by falls or four footed beasts, and 
broken bones. If (^ T2 ^^^ $ ^^^ joined together in the evil 
conflux, the consequence will be more dreadful, and the death 
more terrible. 

The being Hyleg, and joined with the following stars. 
Caput Algol, Hercules, Bellatrix, Regulus, Antares, threatens 
a violent death and extreme sickness ; with the Pleiades, Cas-« 
tor, Pollux, Presepe, or the Asselli, by blows, stabs, shooting, 
beheading, or shipwreck; the bright star called the Eagle, 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 14? 

and Fomahaiit^ are said to cause bites from animals or reptiles, 
as also the last star in Capricorn's back. Those who have the 
luminaries with those stars aire generally fearfnl of being bitten 
by Teneroons reptiles. The Sun with the Pleiades frequently 
causes total blindness. 

The > with Caput Algol, Aldebaran, Pollux, or Bellatrix, 
denotes a violent death ; with the Pleiades, Presepe, Antares or 
Deneb, blindness or gutta serena ; with Orion, injuiy to one 
eye, at least. If it be a new moon near the Pleiades, and ^ or 
g be joined to Regulus, it generally causes total blindness ; 
witii Antares in ^ to Aldebaran, death by banging or snffoca- 
tion. If ^ be with Aldebaran, the native will die by a stab, 
blow, or fall, more especially if from angles. If the Hyleg be 
with Herodes, ^t Arcturus, death ensues by suffocation ; with 
Cor Hyd#a in ^ D or ^ of (^ , death by drowning, or poison 
eiisuej^, ei^pecially if (^ be angular. With Sirius and 1?, or 
with (^ and M^rkab, death will happen by means of wild beasts 
or soldiers. With Orion and T2 , or Caput, Hercules, and An- 
taresf, assassination or drowning ensues. ^ with the Pleiades, 
ai!id 1^ with Regulus ; this configuration denotes danger of a 
violent death. 

Y^ in Kf and the ^ in ivp, or T^ in a ipotery sign, and the 
]) in ^ to him, denotes death by drowning or excessive 
drinking. 

1^ in TTi in (^ with (^, and the }) in tfg, making application 
to them, denotes danger by drowning and intoxication. 

T^ in the seventh house, in ^ to the and $, denotes 
death by imprisonment, slnttishness, poison, poverty, fear, tor- 
ments in a dungeon, violent falls, and death in exile or a far 
distant land. 

I2 id the tenth house, thus aifiicting the Hyhg, declares 
death by the fall of honsesi, stones, or ponderous iliasses ; but 
if a watery sign be on the cusp of the fourth bouse, by water. 

T; and ^ in the twelfth house, denotei$ death or danger by 
bea$td. 

Q or ^ on the cusp of the twelfth, and a planet unfortunate. 
Aemvi, signify the native will be in danger of falls from horscte. 



l^S A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

I7 and (^ in the seventh, in the common signs n iff ^ X > 
and the 1> in d Q or ^ to them, denotes sudden death by falls. 

T2 and ^,0T ^ Y2 ^^^ $>of ^ ^i^d ]^ in the eighth house, 
are indicative of a violent death, unless )/ or $ assist in the 
fatal conflux. 

T^ in the seventh with $ , and in evil aspect to ^ , denotes 
hanging. 

^ lA the seventh, in r SI t » afflicting the Hyleg, de- 
notes danger of burning to death ; in feral signs, especially 
St t , death by ruins, or falls of timber or houses, or falls from 
horses or beasts ; (J^ > in fiery signs, in a to T; in s Til or ^ , 
denotes death by scalding, hot water, or burning chymical 
liquids. 

As a proof of the foregoing rules being founded on truth, a 
few instances may be noticed. — ^Thus the brave and lamented 
Nelson, was born with the violent planet Mars, nearly on the 
cusp of his " House of life,'' in the sign Scorpio, a violent sign ; 
Mars being nearly in sesquiquadrate to Herschel in Pisces, each 
in watery signs. The Sun, Hyleg in Libra, in sesquiquadrate 
to Saturn, from a humane sign, and Mars in mundane quartile 
to Saturn. As the time of his birth is undisputed, nothing 
could more powerfully evince the truth of the foregoing rules 
than his illustrious Horoscope. 

The next instance which may be brought forward of violent; 
directions producing an untimely end, is in the nativity of Mrs. 
Marr, and her ill-starred infant child, who was murdered at 
RatclifTe Highway a few years ago. In the moUier's Horos- 
cope, Mars and Herschel were angular, in conjunction in the, 
sign Cancer ; the Moon being hyleg, was afflicted by a precise, 
sesquiquadrate aspect of Saturn, and the Sun in the same ma- . 
lignant configuratioa to Mars and Herschel ! and in the infant's 
Horoscope, both Saturn and Mars were in conjunction in the 
House of Death, afflicting the principal angles and also the 
hyleg ! The time of the above births was correctly taken, and 
their Horoscopes have been already before the public, in. a pe- 
riodical publication, from whence we take them. 
The last instance we shall bring forward, before the subject 



! 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOG^T. 149 

is closed^ is that of the late emperor Napoleon, who being 
born while the laminaries were befriended by the powerful 
beams of the fortunate planets, thronghoat life escaped free 
from violence of every description^ althoagh^ according' to his 
historian, he was frequently in battle amidst the thunders of 
war, when not only was death dealt around him on every side, 
but so imminent was his personal danger, that the cannon balls 
frequently tore up the ground under his horse's feet ! Yet Ju- 
piter, his kindly planet, preserved him even there, amidst a host 
of dangers, and although a hopeless and forlorn exile, he was 
fated to die a natural death, free from any violence whatever. 

4 

€\it 0>utuxt anti ^mlitv of fbt Mitdi* 

<* Most of OUT fellow sabjects are guided either by the prejudice of education, or 
by a deference to the judgment of those who, perhaps, in their own hearts, dtsap- 
prove the opinions which they industriously spread among the multitude.'* 

Addisox. 

Nothing is more true in Astrology, than the above sentence 
of the inimitable, accomplished, and devout Addison ; for the 
student may rest assured, that out of a hundred persons who 
openly disbelieve the art, there are at least ninety who believe 
in it in secret : although such is the power and influence of 
slavish custom, over the minds of those who dare not think for 
themselves, that the fear " of the world's laugh,'' as it is termed, 
hinders them from avowing their opinion — by which means, a 
noble science too frequently becomes neglected, and amongst 
men of (probably great learning, but) small judgment, is set 
down for an untruth. 

The actual influence of the stars over the human mind, is one 
of the principal points in Astrology ; and lest the reader of this 
work should here be inclined to incredulity, and urge the 
apparent impossibility, on account of their great distances, we 
beg him to remember that the astonishing influence of the Sun 
and Moon over the waters of the vast and stormy ocean, (by 
which our tides are produced) is admitted, toithout dispute, by 
all classes, whether learned or simple ; and as man is an animal 



IdD A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

«ubject t6 tha same migpfaty laws which goFern the universe %i 
large, he must be also perpetually affected thereby. Hence, 
tbef same cause which sets in motion the waters of the unfa* 
thomafole deep, is perpetually producing various fluctuations in 
the atmosphere wherein we live and breathe ; neither can the 
human body be sensibly affected, without the tnind partaking 
at the same time of those effects which produce those corpo- 
real sensations, as a celebrated poet expresses himself: 

<( Tempori esli, corpasque, animosque mutatur.*' 

Henoe, the perpetual tossing and rolling of the tide of life, is 
referable to the self-same cause as the tossing and rolling of 
the waters of the oc^an^ namely, planetary influence. 

In all cases of which the sidereal science takes cognizanee, 
the mind and disposition are governed by the Moon and Mer- 
cury ; $ rules more particularly over the rational, and the J> 
over the irrational or animal soul. 

As these two planets are posited in according or discordant 
signs, or afilicted or assisted amongst themselves, by configura- 
tions of various stars, so will be the mind and disposition of him 
whose Horoscope it is ; in which respect their being found in 
differ^t €ign^ are to be meet attentively observed ; thus 

Tropical and equinoctial signs, t ^ s yf> contribute to 
render the mind active, sharp, ingenious, pimble, lively, ambi- 
tious, and persevering. 

Bieorporeal and common signs, H ^ t ^, contribute to 
vender men subtle, crafty, versatile, repining, regretting, un-> 
stable, volatile, dec^tful, sc^perficial characters ; but of intense, 
acute, and powerful feelings. 

Fixed signs (when occupied by the D and $ ) as Q V), j^ C2 > 
are found to produce just, plain, rigid, unbending* inflexible, 
0rm, obstinate, patient, steady, laborious, conteatiouBy malicious, 
ambitious, and thrifty persons. 

Whenever the D and ^ are in signs of the above quality, 
void of aspects, the dispositions will greatly partake of the 
above description ; but the aspects of the planets will neutralise 
or modify, and alter the effects surprisingly ; thus, their general 
fualities are. 



QfiNKTHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 1«'>1 

Of ]^, atraog^ness^ waywardness, romantic ideas, eecentri- 
^ty, perpetual wish for discovery of secrets in science or art, 
a love of things out of the track of custom, as antiquities and 
mystic leiurning> or enthusiastic reveries. 

Of 12 f tewc, melancholy, slowness, labor, solitariness, and a 
propensity to weeping. 

Of 11 , honesty, candour, magnanimity, security, benevolence, 
good nature, and confidence. 

Ot ^, quarrels, anger, rashness, desperation, courage, pro- 
pensity to war and strife, and all manner of violence. 

Of ?, beauty, delicacy, love of poetry, music, or the fine 
arts, dancing, immoderate amorous desires and good taste, with 
elegance in every undertaking. 

Of ^ , learning, eloquence, wit, and judgment, science, and 
knowledge of every kind, genius and activity. 

Of the Q, ambition, enterprise, thirst for fame, a desire to 
waste money, and for vain glory, every possible way. 

Of the D , changeableness, craft, desire for travelling and 
cariosities, activity and industry. 

In these cases, also, the D or ^ in aspect to Igi, never fails 
to produce Astrologers and Antiquarians; ^ in aspect to 3^, 
mak^s surgeons or warriors ; $ and $ in aspect, form the 
genius whence arises poets, players, and musicians ; ^ and the 
D in aspect, give satirists and contenders against public opi- 
nion ; If. and ^ , conduce to the study of the law or divinity ; 
and I2 joining therein, gives a fondness for mystic religion, 
sects, and heresies. 

With the foregoing data for his guide, the student must well 
consider the natural strength or weakness of the. ]) and ^ ; 
also the accidental fortitudes or debilities they may receive by 
aspects with the various stars, as the aspects are far more ma- 
terial than any other testimony ; thus, for instance, were ^ in 
a common sign, which we have described, as producing an in- 
ooDSlant mind, (because in such a case the mind takes up with 
too many pursuits at once) yet if $ and T2 be in close d ^ Aj 
quintile or bi-quintile, or close zodiacal parallel, the native, 
instead of inconstancy, will have enough of T? instilled into 
the nature of $ to render him a most profound and patient 



162 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 

inquirer into the secrets of nature ; and the very versatility of 
the aspect will tend for good^ since it will enable him to leave 
no means untried to obtain the truth of the matter. < In all cases, 
this must be well remembered ; and thus by a few simple prin- 
ciples (as infallible as humanity will allow in themselves) ^he 
student will arrive to the complete knowledge of this sublime 
science. 

RELATING TO RICHES OR POVERTY. 

The destiny throughout life, as conducing to poverty or 
wealth, has, in particulars, been judged by the Orientals and 
Europeans, by different rules ; yet, in generahthey all agree. 
Ptolemy recommends us to keep to the '* part of fortune" (which 
in every Horoscope is the true mundaTie distance between the 
O and ]) , projected from the ascendant, on the path of the D 's 
declination.) The Arabians refer chiefly to ** the second house 
and its lord ;" but in general such as the strength or weak- 
ness by majority of testimony, they all agree in the main point, 
which is, that no perfect good can come from that which is by 
nature contaminated ; therefore in every nativity, the student 
must well observe the prevailing testimonies, and not hastily 
form judgment without just reason for so doing. 

The O and ]) are powerful significators in these particulars, 
as receivers of good or evil by aspect ; If. and $ are the causes 
or natural authors of good ; T^ ^ and ^, are naturally evil 
and unfortunate ; ^ is either way, as he may partake of the 
bei^ms of afflicting or assisting stars. This being considered the 

* 
SIGNS OF WEALTH, are 

The O and }) in (^ , semisextile ^, quintile. A, bi-quintile or 
parallel of If and $ . The parallel may be either zodiacal or 
mundaue (the zodiacal parallel has been already described.^ 
The mundane parallel is, when a planet is at equal distances 
from any of the four angles ; thus a star in the ninth, and one 



G£N£THLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 153 

10 the eleventh^ are in parallel^ (if the same distance from the 

relative cnsps) and these are deemed of great efficacy. 
The J> strong by ncUure, in a sign where she is dignified, 

and free from evil aspects, is fortunate. The so situated, is 

the same, but the ]) is a more powerful significator of good 

fortune than the Q, 

The O or D angular, and free from evil configurations, even 
if not dignified, is a testimony of great prosperity. The lumi- 
naries with eminent ^/brecf stars, are also prosperous. 

The O ^o^ ^ in -X- or A aspect, is sure to produce great 
success in life ; as also the O or ]) in ^ or A to $ . 

In these cases, if the and }) are strong every way, both 
by nature, sign, and aspect, the native will become rich and 
extremely wealthy, at times to excess ; if the testimonies are 
of a mixed nature, he will have but a moderate share of good 
fortune, if either of the fortunes 7/ or $ be angular, and un- 
afflicted, the same results will ensue ; therefore all that is re- 
quisite in these cases, is for the student to pay a philosophical 
attention to sidereal causes, and judge accordingly, always 
remembering to leave prejudice and self entirely out of the 

question. 

I 

SIGNS OF POVERTY. 

Signs of poverty, and an unfortunate Horoscope, are the O 
and ]) in (^ semiquartile, D sesquiquadrate ^ or parallel of 
y^ or Igi. These are the worst positions ; bat even these are 
increased by being in angles. Q and }) in the same aspects 
to (J^ , is highly unfortunate ; but T^ is the true author of trou- 
ble, and the source (under Divine Providence) whence proceeds 
the " iron hand of griping poverty," and the perpetual mishaps 
of life, whereby the native is bom to trouble *' even as the 
sparks fly upwards." 

The O or D (but especially the ]) ) in D > semiquartile, ses- 
quiquadrate, OT ^ o( 11, causes misfortune through wasting, 
and squandering money. He who has this aspect unassisted, 
although possessed of thousands, will die poor. Imprisonment, 
as well as poverty, is caused by the planet $ being highly 
afflicted, such as his^^ semiquartile, Q , sesquiquadrate, or ^ to 



1^4 A MAKUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

i^ 1^ or <^. IjjL much afflicts ^ "by his expect; {>er80Di hating 
him 80 aspectedj will neTor be any way fortuoate or suecessfQl 
in writings^ books, basiness, or pablic opinion. 

T^ or (^ angular, is of itself evfl, censing perpetaal obstacles 
in the way of advancement ; bat T^ is fkr worse than g ; and 
should l;/! or f assist these by aspect, the native will advance 
himself in life " per pi, et via,'' by fighting, as it were, against 
his evil star; when the fortunes 1/ or $ are hurt by €ispect, 
the native never can be rich ; but in all cases, as before ob- 
served, let the majority of testimonies be carefully taken. It 
must also be observed, that wherever a nativity is unafflicted by 
aspect, the native will be negeUivety fortunate ;- that is to say, 
what he may procure, he will be aUe to retain. As also where 
the planets If. ^ Q and } , are strong by aspect, and not 
afflioted by position, the native will be positively fortunate, or 
bom to great wealth. But the best nativities are those wherein 
are found testimonies of saving, or thrift and economy, and at 
the same time, of fortune's favours. The real " favourite of for- 
tune," has the fortunate planets angular and unajffKcted, with 
the luminaries receiving their rays. The real " child of misfor- 
tune,'' has the evil planets in the same position ; and every 
planet is more or lesa vitiated by mal*coofigurations. Tfiat 
there is this fate in nature, the sad history of thousands, both 
of the past and present time, too plainly and sensibly proves. 

'< For fartime at lome hours to all is kind : 
The hicky have whole days, which stUl they choo«e ; 
The unlucky have but hours, and ihfm th€y /we.*' 

€:j^e dfortnnr of i£Umft. 

■ la some measure, this has been anticipated in our foregoing 
lemarks, but not entirely ; for some are notorious and infamous, 
at the same time; some notorious and splendid; some renowned; 
and some are subject to fame, and to *' live in histoiy ;" who 
are yet occasionally subject to pecuniary misfortunes. 
Testimonies of a public name, are whei) the superior planets, 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 1^5 

especially ^ ^ (? O MidT/'areaDgular^of course^althougk 
publicity and notoriety are denoted by Y^ IS^Of ^, beiag angu- 
lar, yet in the mid-heaven these stars, especially the two 
former, are yery malignant and mischievous, generally denoting 
some sad eatctatrophe to finish the portents of such a scheme of 
nativity. The more these planets are afflicted amongst them- 
selves, or afflict the luminariias, the worse it is ; as also when 
assisted by a good aspect, they are not so evil ; indeed, when 
the evil planets are fortunated by configurations, they produce 
good out of evil. 

Three planets or more in the same sign of the heavens, cause 
a public name at some particular period of life ; the time of 
which depends entirely on the operating directions. 

or ]) in the mid-heaven, near the cusp, are sure to pro- 
duce great success in life, with a name known both far and near, 
or if 11 and $ be conjoined with these they give an extensive 
fame, great honor, lasting credit, power, and eminence. The 
native is sure to eclipse and outdo all his contemporaries, as 
well as to be victorious in almost every controversy wherein 
he may be engaged. 

The sign n (done, is found to produce many persons of emi- 
nence, on account of the great number of fixed stars it pos- 
sesses. All the planets above the earth, (or the greater part 
of all) indicates fame ; and 11 or ^ near the mid-heaven, is 
another testimony of glory or renown ; and a name " that must 
live after death," yet it gives numerous petty rivals, who, to 
use the simile of an old author, like *' dogs haying the moon," 
are generally as presumptuous as they are imbecile and worth- 
less. 

1^ and $ conjoined, near the mid-heaven, or near the cusp 
of the ascendant ; ^ $ and ^ in the ascendant, or mid-hea- 
ven ; $ angular in n ^ t;:::^ or ti]^ ; the ]) in a watery, and the 
in 9l fiery sign ; as also in mundane -X- or A to the mid-heaven, 
or in mundane •^ or a to the ascendant, (in which instances 
the planets must be on, or close to the cusp of the twelfth, 
ninth, second, eighth, fifth, or sixth houses)all these are typical 
of a moderate eminence ; but the most powerful of those aspects 
is the mundane ^ to the mid-heaven, from the cusp of the 
twelfth house ; next to this is the mundane A to the mid-hea- 



156 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

. ven, from the sixth house. Q ^ H or ^ , being' thus' posited 
in ^ to the M. C. are sure to produce effects worthy of envy^ 
(if any thing can justify that passion.) 

Planets in the fourth house, although angular, are by no 
means so powerful as in any of the other angles ; and although 
they foreshow an eminent name, late in life, it is by no means 
durable, but liable to strange interruptions ; while they who 
have the fortunate planets, especially ^ or ^ in the tenth 
house, have a durable celebrity. The cause for this may be 
probably owing to the natural strength of the mid-heaven, 
since every thing in the creation, s'eems to point to the zenith ; 
and indeed were it not for the fructifying- and genial beams of 
the Sun, in his diurnal approach to that part of the heavens, not 
only would all vegetation be annihilated, but all the earth 
would become barren, bleak, and desolate. The mid-heaven 
is therefore justly accounted by Astrologers, the most powerful 
angle in the whole celestial circle of the heavenly houses. 

The general significator of marriage, or that which is common 
to both sexes, is the seventh house, or west angle. Invariably 
the student will observe that when I2 ^ or ^ is therein, a 
discordance in marriage will occur. If they are aflSicted, a fatal 
and unhappy union takes place, ending in misery or hate, or 
mutual dislike ; if they are assisted by a fortunate aspect of H 
or $ , the marriage, though not prosperous, may not be un- 
happy ; but the native will bury his or her, wedded partner. 
As unhappiness in marriage is thus caused, so happiness therein, 
is the result o( If. or ^ being found unafflicted in the seventh 
house. 

The particular significators of wedlock are different; thus 
the Moon is the particular significator of marriage to the man, 
so far as the marriage contract is concerned ; and to marry /or- 
tunate, the }) should be (in the man's horoscope) assisted by 
the good aspects of 7/ or $ . To marry happy, the ]) in a to 
the O may suffice ; but that would not ensure good fortune. 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 15? 

If the D is in (^ semiquartile, O sesquiqoadrate, g or parallel 
of ^ (J" or ^^ the native is unfortunate in his choice ; if the ]) 
be in semiqaartile> O sesquiquadrate or ^ to ^ Q or $ , he is 
by no means fortanate therein ; if in (^ , parallel, semisextile 
^, qnintile, A or bi-quintile to 1^ or $ , the native will be 
eminently fortanate therein, provided the seventh house is not 
afflicted by the presence of evil stars. The planet either posited 
in the seventh house, or to whom the ]) applies by aspect, will 
describe the person of the wife, and her conditions. 

In a female horoscope, the O is the prime sig-nificator, and 
must be judged in every respect as the ]) in the male horos- 
cope. In both sexes, $ afflicted, shows an unhappiness in love ; 
but in a female nativity, g has great share therein, and many 
females have late marriages solely through having ^ weak and 
afflicted in their horoscope. 

In a female nativity, if the ]) be in semiquartile D ^ (f or ses- 
quiquadrate to ^ , unchastity is greatly to be feared, unless % 
or $ assist to avert the noxious configuration. Plurality of 
husbands or wives is denoted by the significators being in bi- 
corporeal signs, andi having many configurations. 

To determine as minutely as the science will allow, of frait- 
fulness or barrenness, (for it is absurdity itself, to attempt at 
predicting the precise number, and none but a silly person would 
attempt it) it must be observed, above all other things, what 
sign the J> is in ; for if in ^ itj^ £i or rs:, a moderate family 
may be expected ; if the ])isinns'n\.^}(,a large family 
is the general result of marriage ; (in this instance the author 
has always found n and f fruitful) ; if the )) is in T Q Yf , 
she is less fruitful than in the other signs ; if the D is in these 
angular, in the tenth, first, or seventh houses, she increases 
the probability of children. A fruitful sign on the cusp of the 
tenth or eleventh houses, denotes offspring ; but the ]) in t 
St Yf in n * or evil aspect to Tj (J or ^, denotes barrenness 
in both parties. Yet to be correct in these cases, the horos- 



158 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

copes of both husband and wife should be inspected carefally, 
and the majority of testimosies taken. 

The contingencies relative to the/ortune in l^e or death, of 
children are taken from the good or ill aspects of the ]) , for if 
the D be afflicted by the d or 411 aspects of ^ T? <? or Of 
the children will either die in youth, or be nnfortnnate, and a 
great trouble to their parents, in these cases, 7/^ or $ assisting 
in the conflgoration, will nullify the evil effects. The parti- 
cular destiny of children can otdy be deduced from their own 
individual horoscopes. 



The Oriental and European Astrologers disagree in many 
particulars relative to travelling and voyages ; but they all agree 
in giving great power in these matters to the third and ninth 
houses. The most approved testimonies of travellings accord- 
ing to the authoi's experience, are these : — 

Many planets in moveable signs, as t ^2: s Vf.^ especially 
T7 fj and ^ (above all others) the D in the ascendant, in tro- 
pical, equinoctial, or common signs; such asTnsin)^:^^ f yf 
or ){ , (but especially the two former) causes incessant jour- 
neying by sea and land ; generally, those persons who visit dis- 
tant countries, and naval persons in general have such positions. 
The }) in the tenth house, or in any angle, is also conducive of 
travelling ; but in the ninth house, she is almost as sure U> 
cause these peregrinations, as when in the aseetidant. The 
Moon in any part of the figure, in n t ^> causes frequent 
changes of residence, but usually these changes happen very 
unexpectedly, or in a strange and extraordinary way. 

The late Queen Caroline, who visited so many strange coun- 
tries, was born with the }) in the first bouse or ascendant, in 
quartile to Mars, but in trine to Jupiter, which denoted infinite 
restlessness of mind, that produced a love for travelling and 
variety ; and Sir Robert Kerr Fortet, a great traveller, well 
known to the world for the elegant and systematic account he 
has given of his peregrinations ; who travelled over £gypt> 
Persia, and various other regions, and married a Russian 



GENETHLIAGAL ASTROLOGY. 159 

princess ; was bom Mrith the J> in the middle of the sign f in 
the angle of fhe foorth house, and both F^ ^^ S ^^ moveable 
signs. Numerons other instances might be given, as proof of 
the author's system, but these will suffice. 

Again, ^ angular in moveable or bicorporeal signs, is ano- 
ther source of travelling ; also planets, especially ^ § and 
the D descending in the seventh house of the nativity ; and 
for the most part, the significators in watery signs s lit K > 
cause voyages ; or after travelling, long residences near the 
water. 

The good or ill fortune attendant upon these* pursuits is de- 
rived from the good or bad aspects which the significators form 
with each other ; as, for instance, the ]) being a significator of 
travelling in rf D <P or ill aspect with ^ <f (ft or in n or 
^ to 11 causes misfortune therein ; to T2 c? $ danger by wa- 
ter ; to ^ danger by piracy or imprisonment : to ^ unpleasant 
travelling ; and so of the rest. But a good aspect to 7^ or $ 
as the parallel, ^^ , semisextile, •)(-, qaintile, trine, or bi-quintiie 
on the contrary, produces riches or good fortune by means of 
journeys and voyages,and render these' peregrinations free front 
danger. 

In every horoscope it must be well observed in the first 
place, whether the places of the O > and ^ are powerful, an<{ 
free from evil or discordant aspects ; for should the nativity be in 
itself, in a manner, /ree from obnoxious rays of Tj (J or ^ , the 
native will have but few enemies capable of doing him injury^ 
although his greatness or eminence in life will naturally cause 
rivals. This, the author has invariably observed. 

If the places of the O D or ^ be afflicted by the (^, parallel 
semiquartile Q, sesquiquadrate or ^ of T^ (J^ or^, the native 
will have a rough, turbulent, and quarrelsome life, and many 
private enemies as well as public adversaries. 

In these cases ^ has great power, for wherever he is afflicted 
by aspect or position, the native is liable to much scandal, re-« 
piroach, and vituperative abuse. The unfortunate Keats the 



160 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

poet, yfho fell a victim to the malicious spleen of ill-timed cri- 
ticism, was born with $ in his horoscope, in' Q to ip and T; . 
Public writers of every description, to attain emineiMe by their 
writings, should have $ unaflSicted by aspect, and aided by 
the fortunes (11 and $ ) or they strive in vain to gain the public 
esteem. 

An extensive circle of acquaintance (generally however but 
few reed friends) is the result of several planets being in the 
same sign, or house of heaven ; the native who has but few 
friends or few acquaintances has on the contrary scarcely any 
fortunate aspect or configuration in his horoscope, from which, 
obscurity in life may naturally be expected. 

In order to* be correct in this particular, the student must 
well observe the Mid-heaven, Ascendant, and places of the lu- 
minaries (the O and ]) .) For according to the quality of the 
stars either in those angles, or aspecting the luminaries, so will 
be the profession or occupation the native is destined to follow. 

In these particulars, T^ denotes all trades or professions re- 
lating to ancient matters ; also those relating to buildings, all 
heavy, dirty, mean, or laborious occupations, and those wherein 
money is obtained with great difficulty. 

11 denotes offices of place of trust, and honorable as well as 
lucrative occupations ; he particularly denotes preferment either 
in the law or the church, and favour of the great 

^ denotes all trades or occupations wherein fire, metals, or 
sharp instruments are used ; the army, and military affairs rela- 
tive to the navy ; also all ingenious and mechanical trades* 

$ denotes all elegant occupations, whether relating to dress, 
decoration, ornament, music, or such like, peculiar to the fair 
sex, or the luxuries of the great. 

^ is the author herein of all literary occupations ; and those 
of a scientific nature, or connected with writing, books, mes- 
sages, papers: or nimble, active, but ingenious and light or 
easy occupations. 

]) denotes various professions accordiog to the sign she 19 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 1^1 

in; of her own natare, she denotes trades or professions where 
great chang'es or frequent alterations are necessary. In watery 
signs s'Ttl o^ K> she denotes those relating to the sea or na- 
val occupations, dealing in fluids and liquids ; in other sig-ns 
her nature is altered accordingly. 

The above are the singular qualities of the chief signifi ca- 
ter^, to which the O may be added as denoting a love of rule 
and dominion, and honorable employments either under the 
state or under some public body of men. ^ denotes occupa- 
tions out of the common, or ordinary, sphere of life, whence he 
so generally conduces to the study of Astrology and Astrono- 
mical speculations. Conjoined, the planets .have other effects, 
which nothing but a minute and close attention to the foregoing 
" elementary principles of the science" can be expected to de- 
velope : but in these cases — 

$ and $ conjoined denotes poets, musicians, musical instru- 
ment makers, actors, dancers, singers, artists, painters, and 
eminent sculptors. 

$ and ^ conjoined denotes statuaries, surgeons, engravers^ 
and workers in ingenious mechanical employments. 
- ? and (J denotes perfumers, dyers, tinmen, plumbers, gold 
and silver smiths, apothecaries, physicians, and hair-dressers. 

Tj and 5 give lawyers, counsellors, stationers, dealers in 
antiquities, and those employed in the lower offices of the state. 
$ in D , ^ semisquare,'or sesquiquadrate to Tj , denotes pro- 
fessed thieves born to inherit the galhtcs for their portion. T^ ^ 
and $ conjoined evilly, denotes genteel swindlers who seldom 
escape punishment, unless when % assists in his aspects at the 
same time, when they may do so. Tj ^ and ^ in evil aspect 
denotes murderers as well as thieves, which is far worse if $ at 
the same time assist in the malignancy of the configuration. 

n f K denote of themselves a variety of occupations, sig- 
nificators therein are judged accordingly ; Q IT}. Q rs: denotes 
but one occupation ; s ^ .T Vf denotes inventions and conse- 
quent changes in the profession or employment ; ti|^ is a pecu- 
liar sign for giving a love of chymistry,and chymical operations. 

Planets strong in angles, more especially in the angles of the 
first and tenth house, denotes eminence in the profession, let that 

L 



lea A MANUAL. OF ASTROLOGY. 

pi!ofet9ioB be vhat it will. EM planets in the tenih or fint 
or in ^ to the cusp of these hoqses^ denote at best bat a me- 
diocrity in the occupation the native follows : bi^t v^d ^ot 
A of V or ? will much assist herein Jn warding^ oCcvil. The 
greater or less proportions of good ox eyiV will b^ readily dis- 
covered by attention to the differeAt coofigyratiops, of the 
operating stars. 

AND THOSE NEARLY RELATED.. 

• 

In treating of the . differeat effects of the twelve houses of 
heaven, we have mentioned, that the north and south angles of 
the figure or nativity, are given as the significatoxs of the. na« 
tive's parent^. Tp tbesi^. must be joined the Q for the princi- 
pal significator of the /eU^er. and paternal kindred, and the D 
for the mother and all maternal relatives, and as these are situ- 
ated so will be th^ir fatet* Ptolemy, in his system, also observes 
\l and $ , but tKese the authipr rejects as incongruous to reason. 

Independent of these, the angles signify ott relatives in a ge- 
neral way ; for when a celestial direction of death, or of any 
particular trouble takes place ia any horoscope, the student will 
observe that the effects^ will extend themselves in distant rami-^ 
fications, both ip good and evil (as *' ope evil seldom comes 
alone''), to a remarkable distance which time and experience 
alone can decypher. In these cases Saturn and Mars act most 
powerfully according to their periodical circuits ; especially 
when either of these planets are. found posited in common 
signs H '^ ^ or H ; in the radical horpscopei, — and, in every 
instance, the nativity of the first-born is to be preferred in this 
mode of judgment. 



CBNETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 1(S3 

^0 Calculate tbt Zimt^ of ^tnt^. 

In calculating the peculiar times when good or ill fortune 
will occur, the ancient and modern Astrologers have made use 
of various different methods ; thus the followers of Ptolemy, 
still make use of the system of zodiacal directions, which is the 
art of computing the length or shortness of the celestial are or 
sptxce of the-heavens intercepted between two signifleators ; 
thus for instance, were a star in four degrees of t> and another 
in eight degrees of Q , the celestial arc intercepted between 
these (or the distance between each) would be what is termed 
an ''arc of direction/' which measured either by right or oblique 
ascension according as the star should be posited, ascendant, or 
vertical, would give a certain number of years and months, 
when the event signified by the meeting of these stars might 
be expected to happen. 

The Arabian and Persian Astrologers make use of another 
method, which is by giving for every day after the birth, a whole 
year in time, and for every two hours motion of the Moon one 
month ; thus were a native born at noon-day, (on the Ist of June 
for instance) the positions of the various stars and planets that 
took place precisely one day, or twenty-four hours succeeding 
the birth, would give events corresponding to a whole year in 
time ; this has been by modern Astrologers termed " secondary 
directions'' 

A third set of Astrologers use the Placidian system, wliich 
in addition to the " zodiacal directions" of Ptolemy, compre- 
hends another complete system of direction, termed mundane, 
being formed entirely by the motion of the Earth* around its 
own axis ; thus, supposing a star to be on the cusp of the mid- 
heaven or zenith, and another within twelve degrees of the 
horizon or ascendant, these stars are virtually approaching a mun- 
dane n > ^^^ the arc or space intercepted between these, when 
measured by the ratio of the stars proportional progress to either 
angle, constitutes another number, which equated by certain 
rales, distinguishes the exact time when the expected (or pre** 
dieted) event will happen. Each of these methods are not only 



1«4 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

oorrect^ and approved by long tried practice^ but may be said 
to defy the least contradiction, from those who will but take 
the pains to examine them, — (and no one else should deli ver an 
opinion upon the subject.) Although each of the above me- 
thods are different, yet they by no means contradict each other, 
but each lead to true results, and in many instances they each 
lead to the foreknowledge of the same event ; in which respect 
they may be compared to the ascent of a mountain by diffe- 
rent paths, where although some paths are longer and more 
difficult than others, they notwithstanding all lead to the same 
object. 

The foregoing considerations, and the almost universal dis- 
like which persons express towards calculations where many 
figures are requisite, first led the author of this work to bend 
his most serious attention to the subject, of discovering (if pos- 
sible) a more concise method of acquiring the exact period 
when the most marked or important events of life would hap- 
pen. In this, he trusts he has' succeeded, (even beyond his 
first wishes) and therefore he now introduces, for the first time 
in the memory of man, his system of ascertaining the time of 
events, by 

®l^e etMtUA mtUnii^ of m $lanet£f. 

The " wise man" has declared that '' there is nothing new 
under the Sun," and hence it is almost certain that the ancient 
Astrologers were well acquainted with the author's discovery; 
although it is pot onl;^ absolutely unknown to the present ge- 
neration, but has never been divulged in any manuscript or 
printed book whatever. Ptolemy in his Centiloquium (apho- 
rism LXXXI) has these remarkable words : " Times are reck- 
oned in seven ways ; viz. by the space between swo significa- 
tors,by the space between their mutual aspects, by the approach 
of one to the other, by the space between either of them and 
the place appropriated to the proposed event, by the descension 
of a star with its addition and diminution, by the changing of a 
signifleator, and by the approach of a planet to its place." 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



]6Ar 



' It is the latter, "changing of a significator/' to which the 
author claims the reader's attention, «since he has found that in 
addition to the art of '' directions/' each of the wandering stars 
or planets has a complete period of its own, entirely distinct from 
every other motion which it may acquire either in the zodiac or 
the world. The "changing" of these planets from sign to sign, 
and thus forming various configurations YfiXh their actual places 
at birth, or with the luminaries, produce events in many instances 
of equal magnitude with " directions ;" and in some instances 
producing the most powerful good or evil fortune as the testi- 
monials may warrant, nay, they fjrequently increase, accelerate 
or retard the time of primary directions. To this cause may be 
also assigned that seeming power of transits over the places of 
the luminaries or other significators ; which a modern student 
in the art in a recent publication was so enraptured with, as to 
write himself down for an apparent simpleton, by exclaiming 
against every thing else but the object of his adoration. The 
foregoing observations will be best exhibited to the readers 
view bv 

A TABLE OF THE 

eelei^ttal ^ertoKd of tat^ ^Xmtt^ 

As solely applicable to Nativities. 



Planets 


Celestial 
Period. 


Motion 
per year. 


Motion 
per month. 


Time, each Planet, by direction, takes in fomiinc 
a Periodical Aspect, either ivith its own place, 
or any other Star, accounted from Birth. 


»? 


years. 

30 


o 1 

12.. .0 


o 1 
1... 


yrs. ms- 

^ 5...0 


yrs. ms- 

D 7.. .6 


yrs. ms. 

A10...0 


yrs. ms. 

^?16..:0 


11 


12 


1 sign 


2.. .30 


.X.2...0 


D 3...0 


A 4...0 j^ 6...0 


<? 


19 


19. ..0 


1...35 


^ 3...2 


D 4.. .9 


A 6...4^^ 9...6 


O 


19 


19.. .0 


1...35 


-X- 3...2 


D 4.. .9 


A 6...4^> 9.. .6 


? 


8 


45.. .0 


3. ..45 


-X-J...4 


D 2...0 


A 2...8 c^ 4...0 


$ 


10 


36... tf 


3... 


A^ 1...8 


D 2...6 


A 3...4 


c> 5...0 


D 


4 


3 signs 


7.. .30 :^ 0...8 


a 1...0A i...4<f 2..0| 


IfT 


Igi's celestial period at present not fully discovered, but 




suppo 


sed to b 


e 84 ye 


ars, and 


7 degree 


s per year. 



166 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

it is presomed that the stiident or attentive rtader will ftbd 
no difficulty in underttandingp thi^ foregoing: Table ; the first 
column has the character of eacft plAtaiet whose celestial period 
in vears, and months, is Ao'ted in the succeeding columns; and 
for the sake of facilitating- Ibe calculation the time each planet 
takes in forming en aspect tdtk its piaoe at birth is also set 
down. By these means the process of using: the above is coin- 
paratively simple and eaVy. 

The ^eets ^ the periodical direction of Tj . 

T2 being thus directed to the radical pljace ,(6r place at birth) 
of the ^, is <)ecidedly evil, knd that period of life unfortunate, 
causing discredit, loss of honor, losses in trade, and if the be 
Hyleg, severe Illness ; to the }) the evils are incre^ed, and io 
addition to them, many deaths and troubles amongst relatives, 
are certain ; to $ great trouble through women, disappoint- 
ment through love ai8ailrs> &c. ; to $ trouMes in business, 
through writings, youthful persons, &c. ; to <J accidents ; and 
to It losses of money. 

The effects ^ ^ hy periodical direction, 

$ produces a variety of evils, at the time as evil as T2 , but 
wh^eas those of T; Are frequently anticipated and prolonged, 
for nearly six months before and after the actual state of the di- 
rection, so those of i soon cease. The nature of his effects 
is similar to the above, except in nativities he causes love in- 
trigues, or marriage when aspecting S(. , and quarrels when as- 
specting $ in his periodical circuit. Tt is a singular and unde- 
niable fact, that whosoever has ^ and $ in aspect at birth, is 
involved in a love affair in his nineteenth year. This is solely 
caused by ^ returning to his own place every nineteen years. 

The effects of 71, by periodical direction. 

% is, of course^ as benevolent as the others are evil ; over 
the 0, which is once every twelve years, he produces eminent 
friends, prosperity, and honorable acquaintance ; over the D 
inarriage or gain by a woman ; over $ the same, over ^ gain 
in business ; over ^^ > in a ma^le nativity friends, in ^female ho> 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 167 

roscope, courtship or manlage ; over 1^ renewal of oldacquaibU 
ance. His effeicts are palpabte^ and is the cause why every 
twelfth year of life is fodnd greatly to resemble each ^ther in' 
beneficial eCTects. 

* 

The effects of the by periodical direction, 

is an ctcHve sigfifficator in every horoscope, hatiirally, the 
significator of honor and credit, and accidentally, of life and 
tiealth. His bein^ directed to fhe d seniiquartile Q sesqui* 
quadrate or <? of ^ or J by his |)eriod of nineteen years, is 
decidedly dang-erous. His ^^ sefmisextile, •)(• quintile, ^ and 
bi-quintile to 11 or $ is fortunate. Of course every one wha 
hais the afflicted at birth, every nineteen years has a serious 
'illness or peculiar trouble, as he then returns to hU radical 
pikce. 

The effects of % by periodical direction, 

$ is benevolent, but in a slighter nature than 11 ; her as- 
.peots are worthy of notice, but are rather transitory. 

The effects of ^ by periodical direction. 

5 over the places or d or <? of Tj or ^ is decidedly evil, 
and his passing the place of the D generally causes journeys. 
In other respects the nature of the planet he passes must be 
judged. 

The effects of the J by periodical direction. 

The ]) is a powerful significator, and by her quick motion, 
going through three whole signs per year, she produces those 
numerous inferior events of life both in good or evil ; which^ 
however light they may appear to be, do not fail to cause much 
passing annoyance or transitory benefit; her effects are fre- 
quently anticipated nearly three weeks, but seldom prolonged. 
This is difficult to account for, except by a rather abstruse strain 
of reasoning, but this very anticipation is a proof of her real 
effects by her periodical circuit. 

To calculate these periodical aspects the student needs 
.nothing more than to take their distance between their places 



168 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

at birth, and tbeir CLspects or conjunctions with the opposingr 
or benefitting stars ; thus were a Native to have the Q in 16^vf. 
and \i in 16® Vf at birth. At fifteen years old, T^ would be in ^ to 
the O ; and at the age of thirty years, he would pass over the 
place of that luminary, each of these would be decidedly evil. 

These directions have usually been termed '' secondary" by 
modern Astrologers; for what reason does not appear plain, 
since it may rather be said that they merit the name of primary, 
on account of their palpable effects over the life and fortune of 
every native. If any error has arisen in observing their effects, 
it must have been through failing to take in, in the scale of 
reasoning, the natural state of the planetary places at birth ; for 
it must be well observed, that if the O &t birth be in good as- 
pect to 7/ or $ , the effects of any, and every evil direction, are 
proportionally weak, and should Q or }) be very weak or 
afflicted at birth, the good aspects by direction of a planet or 
star will have but a trifling effect either way. For want of 
observing these preliminaries, and blindly judging by certain 
(so deemed) infallible rules, the science has met with that 
blame which should only have been attributed to its injudicious 
professors. 

Julius Firmicus, a celebrated old author, speaks highly of 
these directions, which he calls primary, wherein he says " that 
the ]) being in SI > and full of light, was carried towards the 
beams of the O." The expert Astrologers of the east use no 
other method but this, for calculating nativities. The author 
thinks fit, however, to term them progressive, as they certainly 
exhibit the true diurnal progress of the heavenly bodies. 

The true method of calculating these important arcs is ex- 
ceedingly simple, and consists in nothing more than taking out 
from the Ephemeris at birth, the places of each planet for every 
succeeding day, accounting a day's motion of the heavenly 
bodies for one whole year, and two hours motion for every month. 

Thus in the scheme of nativity already given, page 13 1 , the ]) 
on the 17tb day, twenty-two hours after birth, formed the com- 



GENETHLIACAL ASTR0L06T. 1^9 

plete D pt.^ , which caused a most violent iollainmation of the 
chest and lungs, requiring, surgical aid, and attended with im- 
minent danger, at eleven months after the birth — and it is 
also worthy of notice, that during the first six months of the 
infant's life it was continually afflicted. The student will ob- 
serve, that the J by period met the Q of c?* "^ weeks after 
birth, the d of ^ at four months old, the D of at five 
months and three quarters old ; and that the D was applying 
uninterruptedly to the D of (J by progressive direction during 
g'reater part of the first II months, which were certainly 
sufficiently powerful to produce so many months illness.—Again, 
the student must not only observe what aspects the luminaries, 
form with each other, or with the good or evil stars at birth, 
bat the aspects they form with the actual places in the radix ; 
and in this respect even the change of the superior planets must 
be accounted, which no former author has yet mentioned. Thus 
for instance, in the nativity of a certain person ; the Q at birth 
was in t22® 51', and when ? by progressive motion, came to 
that degree of the zodiac, at so many years after the birth as 
there were days, the native married ; and in the child's nati- 
vity, page 131. at eight days and nine hours after the birth day, 
the ]) will be in ^f to (J , which answers to eight years and 
four months and a half of the child's life, when he will be in 
danger of a violent scald or burn ; and in his sixteenth day 
after birth, corresponding to the sixteenth year, the ]) will be 
in ^ with 1/ in ffi , which will be productive of amazing friends, 
happiness, and good fortune, in various w.ays. 

Another occurrence which has already taken place in the 
aforesaid child's horoscope, was occasioned solely by the perio- 
dical direction of Tj , (and will serve to show the excellence 
of this method) for by accounting the distance between the 
place of Tj at birth, and the place of the }) 's J* , in 16® II' of n » 
it is found to be nearly 22®, which denotes twenty-two months, 
Tj 's moition being 1° per month, at which time the infant re- 
ceived a violent fall, which caused a fracture of the os humeri 
(or collar bone) for observe the aspect took place in n » which 
rules the shoulders, but which was not dangerous, as 11/ by the 
same method was in 0. 0' 15? within orbs of the A of the © 



170 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



(Hylegr) and ^ by her periodical aspect was exactly in 2^<* 
4(y of n, in close ^ to the Hyleg ; the ]) by her motion, ib 
0^ 11' of , in ^ to ^ , another preservative ; but ^ had pro- 
ceeded to 1° 38' rrt in ^f to the place of 5 > in q , the sig*ft 
which rules the extremity of the neck, another testimbny that 
an accident was likely. 

The attentive student will, fVom the above examples, be ez-^ 
pert in his calculations by this process ; but in order to give 
every possible clue to the method of these predictions, we shall 
insert several remarkable horoscopes, as proofs of our theory ; 
in all of which the time of birth may be relied on, as ^hey are 
obtained from undeniable sources of veracity. 

The first example is 

®t>e 0mi>its of W late iWaleiStp* 





January 29th, 1820. 

Calculated by the Astronomer 
Royal. 



0£N£THLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



171 



The only remarkable positions which we shall notice in thii 
illustrious geniture, are, first, the almost perfect Q of the }) l^ 
and ^, which subjected the native to those frequent attempts 
on his life, which the ^ of tiie © and 1/ , and the ^ of 11 ^ 
$ and ^ frustrated; next, the sing^ular position of <^ \n T , 
and 11 in the same sig-n, ang:ular, in the house of honor ; and 
lastly, the configurations of four planets in n , the sign remark- 
able for producing insanity, when thus afflicted. These alone 
are sufficient to stamp the mark of truth on the Astral science. 

By progressive direction, on the 2dth of August 1738, four 
boors before noon, which answers to eighty-one years, eight 
months of the native's life ; being eighty-one days twenty hours 
after birth (allowing a day for each year). 

The planets were thus posited : 



trp 
l2o 27' 



}) 
2<» 



n 

45' 



8» 



8' 



1/^ r 

29*> 65' 



(? n 

7® 90' 



? :0. 

2l«>28' 



7^ 28' 



In which the O hyleg is in Q to his own place, in sesqui- 
qaadrate to the radical place of 11 , and in a to the place of 
^ by direction. The ]) is in ({ with ^ , and n to the © by 
direction, and in semiquartile to the radical place of 11 , and 
approaching the radical place of the ©. — ^ is in Q to f; by 
direction, and in ^ to the place of ^ in the radix, with not a 
single benefit fay to arrest the fatal congress. 

In the periodical directions, the aphetical and anaretical pla- 
nets were posited as under, viz. 




It is certainly remarkable that in both (the progres&ive a!;d 
ilie periodical direction) the }) should be ported in ii> but in 
tbeiolfer her position is more curious and striking, since &be 
ai^liet to (within a fortnight's motion of) the ©'s body, while 
the O is in perfect Q to 1^ . Bat the most powerful ray of the 
whole, is the planet \i in 17^K , lately separated from the a 



17*i 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



of the ; and if we suppose the Dative (which was we beliere 
the case) to have been first seized with his last fatal illness four 
months />rertou« to his death, the a of the Q ^^^ ^ would be 
perfect by f^ 's aspect ; and the Q would at the same time have 
been also by his aspect in exact a to the samo anaretical star. 



€^z i^ata)it|^ of tl)e late (Siueen 



&wctUm* 




We have inserted this nativity, chiefly for the purpose of 
evincing the singular power and truth of the celestial iqflnences. 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



173 



iks they relate to travelling and voyages ; for in this horoscope 
the student will observe the }) posited in the e^eendant, in a 
to (f , and in the bicorporeal, active, and volatile sign n- No 
wonder then that the native should have had such a peculiar 
propensity to visit the remotest regions. 

The progressive directions at the time of death were 






s 


]) 





^ 


S 


^ 


.n. 


(? 


r 


? 


s 


5 


a\ 


170 


32' 


170 


0' 


8^ 


50' 


14^ 


20' 


13® 


30' 8° 


O'l4o 


o'l 



The T) being in semiquartile to Tj , and n to J , and an ^ 

of It^ and (J . 

In the periodical directions, the principal planets were po- 
sited as underneath. 



^2 r 

no 6' 



<n^ 7' 



K 
15<> 64' 



0«> 48' 



^ being in exact semiquartile to the ©'s place at birth, and 
the ]) in almost perfect d to that of Tj , which certainly affords 
a luminous proof of the Astral science 

It is worthy of remark, that the very day of the death of 
Queen Carolina was predicted in the " Prophetic almanack for 
1821," twelve months before it happened ! What will the dis- 
believers in the art say to this ? 



^ ^rimarp ^oWatal ©ivettiottjf. 

Although the student may certainly discover the chief events 
of his life by the foregoing methods ; yet as some persons may 
deem this work incomplete without it, we will give the pro- 
blems for calculating these celestial arcs. 

Directions termed zodiaccd, are nothing more than the inter- 
cepted arcs between certain significators, as before observed ; 
and are easily calculated by a skilful arithmetician. 

Problem 1 . To find the right ascension of a star, withmt 
latitude. 



174 A MANUAi. OF ASTROLQGY. 

Rule.— *ilflM the co-^ne of its longitudinal distance from the 
nearest equinoctial point, to the arithnpetical comple^ient of the 
eo-aine of its declination, the ^nim will be the co^sine of its right 
ascension from that point whence the distance was tajken. 

If the star be in r or n » the arc thu^ found will be the R. A. 
But if it be in s SI or tt]^, it must be subtracted from 180^. If 
in £i: TH, or / , it must be added to 180°. If in Vf ^ or K, the 
arc thus found must be subtracted from 360°. 

Problem 2. — Tq find the R. A. of a star, with latitude. 

Rule. — As the co-sine of the star's declination is to the co- 
sine of its longitudinal distance, so is the cosine of its latitude 
to the cosine of the right ascension required. 

The R. A. may also be easily found by Astronomical taUes^ 
which are easily procured. In those, it is already calculated. 

Problem 3. — To find the Ascensional Difference. 

Rule. — Add the tangent of the latitude of the birth-place, 
to the tangent of the declination, the sum will be the sine of 
the Ascensional Difference. 

Problem 4. — ^To find the Semi-diurnal arc of a star. 

Rule. — If the star have north declination, add the ascen- 
sional difference to 90o. If south, subtract it from 90° ; the 
remainder is the required arc. 

Problem 5. — To find the Semi-nocturnal arc of a star. 

Rule. — Subtract the Semi-diurnal arc from 180°, it will giv6 
the Semi-nocturnal arc required. 

Problem 6. — To find the Oblique Ascension or Oblique De* 
sceiision of a star. 

Rule. — If the star have north declination, subtract the As- 
censional Difference from the R. A. ; the remainder is the Oblique 
Ascenrion. If south declination, add it instead qf subtracting. 

If the star have north declination, add the Ascensional Dif- 
ference to the R. A. ; and if south subtract it ; the remainder 
is the true Oblique Descension required. 

Problen^ 7- — To find the pole of a star, or celestial house, in 
any figure. 

Rule I. — As the semi-arc is to 90°, so is its distance in R. A. 
from the meridian or fourth house, to the difference between its 
circle of position, and that of the meridian ; which difference 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 17^ 

aubtracted from its rigpht distance, will g^ive its true Ascen- 
sional Difference under its oum pole. 

RuLS 2.— tTo the sine of this ascensional difference, add the 
co-tang^eni of i(s. declination ; the sum will be the tangent of 

its pole. 

Problem S.—l^o direct a significator to any part of the hea- 
vens, or any star, CQ^junctiob^ or aspect, without latitude. 

Rule. — Find the true Oblique Ascension or Descension of the 
star, under its otm celestic^ pole, and subtract this from the true 
Oblique Ascension or Oblique Descension of the conjunction or 
aspect, taken under the same pole ; the remainder is the true 

celestial arc of direction. 

Troblem 9. — ^To direct a significator with latitude. 

From the true Obli<][ue Ascension or Descension of the aspect, 
taken as before ; under the pole of the sig'nificator, subtract that 
significator's true Qblique Ascension or Oblique Descension 
under its own pole. The remainder is the arc of direction. 

m i^unHatie ilrimari? 99iretttomf. 

To the Angles. 

A diagram has been already given, page 140, of these direc- 
tions, to which we refer the reader. Further explanation is 
therefore unnecessary, since the author will now give the facile 
and ready method of calculating every celestial arc of direction 
to the twelve houses, by rii^ht ascension only. 

Problems. — ^To bring.a star to the cusp of any celestial house. 

Rule.— i/'(^e star he above the earth, to bring it to the cusp 
of the ascendant, subtract its semi'-diurnal arc from its right 
ascension. If to the cusp of the twelfth, subtract two-thirds 
of its semi-diurnal arc. If to the cusp of the eleventh, subtract 
one-third. If to the cusp of the tenth, neither add nor sub- 
tract. If to the cusp of the ninth, add one-third of the naid 
semi-arc. If to the cusp of the eighth, add two-thirds. If to 
Ihe cusp of the seventh, arid the whole scmi-<Jiurnal nrv.. 

Universally /\W9\\ the above problems, subtract from thi^ 



176 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

sum or remainder the Right Ascension of the mid-heaven, the 
remainder will be the arc of direction sought. 

Rules. Jf the star he below the Earth. If it is to be brought 
to the cusp of the sixth, subtract two-thirds of its semi-noctur- 
nal arc from its right ascension ; if to the fifth subtrabt one- 
third ; if to the fourth neither add nor subtract ; if to the third 
add one-third ; and if to the second add two-thirds of its semi- 
nocturnal arc. 

Universally. Subtract from this sum, or remainder, the R. A. 
of the Imum Coeli, or fourth house ; the remainder will be the* 
true celestial arc of direction. 

Every direction to the angles may be calculated by those rules. 

^'^t £¥l\xt(timt BivttiionS, 

Which the Stars form amongst themselves. 

Placidus de Titus (mathematician to the archduke Leopold 
of Austria,) was the first writer on this system ; and there can 
be lio doubt of their efficacy, when we relQect that daily expe- 
rience confirms the wonderful power which the planets have 
over all sublunary affairs ; by their mundane rising, setting, and 
culminating ; this no one in their senses we think can deny. 
The proofs of these directions are open to the reader by the fol- 
lowing problems : 

Problem 1 . To direct a significator conversely (or contrary 
to the order of the signs) to the conjunction of a star, is the 
exact reverse of problem 9. For instead of taking the oblique 
asiiension, or oblique deseension of the aspect under the pole of 
the significator, we take the oblique ascension or descensioa 
of the significator under the pole of the conjunctive aspect. 
However, we will here give a general rule which will answer 
in all cases whatever, for calculating mundane directions. 

GENERAL PROBLEM for all MUNDANE DIRECTIONS. 

Rule 1. Observe that the planet which forms the aspect by 
moving conversely must always be directed, whether it be sig^ 
nificator or promittor. 



G£N£THLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 177 

2. Observe tha star to whose plaa or aspgeit the difectioD U 
to be made, and take tto distance from the cusp, either of the 
preceding or succeeding house: find also the dbtaace of the 
star to be directed, from the cusp of that house that forms the 
required configurator with the cusp of the other house^from 
wheate. the fitst distance was taken, mnd eM thm U»t the fri' 
mary distance, 

3. TheiQ say, as the horary time (one^ixth of the semi-arc) 
of the planet to whose configuration the other is to be directed, 
is to its distance from the cusp of the house whence its distance 
is taken, so is the horary time of the planet to be directed to its 
secondary distance 

If this secondary distance be on the same side of the cusp from 
whence the primary was taken, subtract the one froni the 
other ; otherwise, if on different sides, add them ; thenr sum or 
difference will be the true celestial arc required. 

A GENERAL PROBLEM TO CALCULATE RAPT 

PARALLELS. 

Rapt parallela are the joint appreaeh of two sters conversely 
to the angte of the 1 0th or 4th, an arc of extraordinary strength 
and power, even where life and deatl^ are eoncemed. 
RuiKA 1« Add their semi-arcs together. 

2* Find the difference between their right ascenuons. 
3. Find the distance of the star that applies to the an- 
gle when the parallel is complete, which it the prinuiry dis- 
tance. 

4. Say, as the sum of their arcs is to the semi-ate of the pla- 
Bet applying to the angle, so is the difference of their right as- 
eensions to the secondary distance. 

5. If both distances are on the same side of the angle, sab«- 
tract the one from the other, if otherwise, add them ; the sum 
or remainder will be the true arc of direction. 

The author rejects all rapt parallels formed on the Eatt or 
West angles as void of any foundation in truth, althou^ former 
writers say much of their eflScacy. The foregoing problems 
are soflSeient to calculate any primary direction whatever^ 

M 



17B 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGT. 



either in zodiac or mundo ; the student should therefore be- 
come well acquainted with their rudiments, or he will not be 
perfect in celestial philosophy. 



^ eaMt tut t^t 0itKiwct of Zixatf 

FOR ALL CELESTIAL ARCS OF DIRECTION. 



MBASUEB OF TIME IN DEGREES. 


MEASURE OF TIME IN MINUTES. 


Degs. 


Trt. Dayi. 


.Ikgt. 


In, 


Days. 


• 

Min. 


Days. 


bn. 


Mio. 


Days. bn. 


1 


1 


5' 


31 


31 


166 


1 


6 


4 


31 


191 11 


2 


2 


10 32 


32 


170 


2 


12 


8 


32 


197 16 


3 


3 


\Q 33 


33 


177 


3 


18 


13 


33 


203 20 


4 


4 


21 


34 


34 


181 


4 


24 


17 


34 


209 


5 


5 


26 


35 


35 


186 


5 


30 


21 


35 


216 4 


6 


6 


32 


36 


36 


192 


6 


37 


1 


36 


222 9 


7 


7 


37 


37 


37 


197 


7 


43 


6 


37 


228 13 


8 


8 


43 


38 


38 


202 


8 


49 


10 


38 


234 17 


9 


9 


48 


39 


39 


208 


9 


55 


14 


39 


240 21 


10 


10 


53 


40 


40 


213 


10 


61 


18 


40 


247 2 


11 


11 


59 


41 


41 


218 


11 


68 


23 


41 


253 6 


12 


12 


64 


42 


42 


224 


12 


74 


3 


42 


259 10 


13 


13 


69 


43 


43 


229 


13 


80 


7 


43 


265 14 


14 


14 


74 


44 


44 


234 


14 


86 


11 


44 


271 18 


15 


15 


80 


45 


45 


240 


15 


92 


16 


45 


277 23 


16 


16 


85 


46 


46 


245 


16 


98 


20 


46 


284 3 


17 


17 


90 


47 


47 


250 


17 


105 





47 


290 7 


18 


18 


96 


48 


48 


257 


18 |lli 


4. 48 


296 11 


19 


19 


101 


49 


49 


261 


19 


117 


9 


49 


302 16 


20 


20 


106 


50 


50 


266 


20 


123 


13 


50 


308 20 


21 


21 


112 


51 


51 


272 


21 


!29 


17 


51 


314 ~ 


22 


22 


117 


52 


52 


277 


22 


135 


21 


52 


321 4 


23 


23 


122 


53 


53 


282 


23 


142 


1 


53 


327 9 


24 


24 


128 


54 


54 


288 


24 


148 


6 


54 


333 13 


25 


25 


133 


55 


55 


293 


25 


J 54 


10 


55 


339 17 


26 


26 


138 


56 


56 


298 


26 


160 


14 


56 


345 21 


27 


27 


144 


5^ 


57 


304 


27 


166 


18 


57 


351 2 


28 


28 


149 


58 


58 


309 


28 


172 


23 


58 


358 6 


29 29 
30|30 


154 


59 


59 


314 


29 


179 


3 


59 364 10 

60 365 — 


160 


60 


60 


320 


30 


1^ 


7 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOOV. 



^atfuas ot Jp. JS. ©. ^rimtss ©Dmlottt. 



i 19. ^3 s . ^ i;j. 



180 A MANUAL OF ASTROIaOQT. 

We live in an envioas world ; and therefore it is perhaps ne- 
cessary to state that the above time of birth was taken from the 
journals of the day, and has been twice published, once by a 
writer in a monthly publication, and latterly in the " Astrolo- 
gical Dictionary.'' — But eack of Ike foragoing' writers were 
either not AstrooooMurs eiiooght to kaow, or wilfully. forgot, to 
make the necessary equatkm of tioie, or the diflbreace between 
the and the clock, whkk on the day ol the luiented prin- 
cesVs birth wom fM;fhe miwiUu tmJ^mM,9& the EphemenA for 
Xh» year piavea. — The above equation in setting thi^ tlgore 
(whiek iq ^very case the student must well observe, as every 

i AMrvnevicr is aware of,) is all the alteration we have made in 
tke rjme of her horpscope^and. which is virtually no altetatioa 

^ at all, bat merely a necessary oorrectioci ; so that the author oC 
tkia work cannot be charged with aught of fallacy, in briagiag^ 
tkb saaguilar horoscope as a most amazing proof of celestial 

, pkilosophy, which it is not in the power of all the sceptics ia 
the aaivevse to invalidate. 

The ) being in the tmnth house is the true Hyleg, wbick 
the atodent will readily. perceive by the rales before laid dowo. 
and her extreme affliction by her application to the zodicLcai 
parallel of T^ , (being within 8' of tkft aspect,)^ is a powerfal 
testimony of a «Aor^ 2t/e, which nothing but the interception of 
$'s parallel could have preserved over the infai^t state; bat 

' which wa^ doomed to fail a prey to the first an^retic conju- 
ration that the Hyleg formed, which we will in this instance 
^calatdal full length,. h&.3.praxi3 for the attentive reader. 



fl^aUttlatton of t^t SInamtc ^vt. 

Of the D to the Rapt parallel of $ . 

Tangentof 51^ 32' - . - 10.09991 

Tangent of J 's decl. 24® 31' S - 9 . 65904 



Sine of the asc. diff. of J 36? 2f = 9 . 75895 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



]«l 



Prom 

Subtract asc. diiT. ^ 



90« 0* 
35 2 

54 • 58 tfae semi-arc of ^ . 



Tangent of 5 1<> 32' 
Tangent of ]) 's decl S. 

Stne of the asc. diff. of 5 26« 49' 

From - - 90® C 

Subtract the asc. diff. J> 26 49 



10 . 00091 
- . 55434 

r= 9 . 65425 



Add the semi-arc of $ 
To the semi-arc of ]) 



63 1 1 the semi-arc of the D 



Sam 



540 58/ 
63 11 

118 9 



K. A. of § 
R. A. of ]) 

Difference between 
the R. A. 



o / 

282 . 47 
254 . 22 



28. 25 



R. A. of g 
R. A. of M. C. 

Distance of the ap- 7 



O f 

282 . 47 
248. 3 



34.44 



plying planet 

As 118^ 9' the sum of the semi-arcs, is to 54^ 58' the semi- 
arc of ^ , sois their difference in R. A. 28^ 25' to the secondary 
distance required : viz. 13^ 13'. 

Distance of the applying star ^ 34^ 44' Primary 
Subtract the secondary distance 13 13 



Arc of direction 



21 31 



Wbich turned into time by the foregoing Table, answer* to 
the exact period of her dissolution. 

Sitmmarp of t|)e mxtttUm of Scat^. 



The D to the Rapt Parallel of ^ 
The D to the Rapt Parallel of 



Trt. mth«. 



182 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



By progreantve direction the planets were thus posited 



O S2 D £: 

9^ 8' 9® 16' 



70 i2'R 



^ n 

6«48'R 



11 « 
17® 19' 



20® 54' 



5 
I80 



21' 



? K 
4^ 21/ 



In which it is worthy of remark, that the T> applied to the 
radical a of $ . — The same planet which in the primary direc- 
tion was endued with such noxious influence ; a sing^ular agree- 
ment between the celestial agency of cause and effect, that is 
probably unanswerable by the enemies of the 'science. 

We will now refer to the doctrine of periodical direction ; 
and first, with respect to the time when the illustrious na- 
tive entered the pale of wedlock. The marriage took place 
on the 2nd of May, 1816, or twenty years and nearly four 
months of her age. Now we have before observed, that in a 
female horoscope the O is invariably the cAte/* significator of 
marriage. By referring to the Table of Periods, we find the Q 
returna to his own place at nineteen years old, to which if we 
«dd 25^ 18' the space of the zodiac he moves in sixteen months 
(deducting a few days,) it brings his true place by period to 
12^ 12^::: the exact place of 11 at birth! Frohsbly nothing 
could better depicture the truth of the science, or the excel- 
lence of .this discovery relative to these celestial periods than 
the above instance. 

The celestial directions (by periods) at the time of death, were 
as follows : 



O K 
10<> 54' 



]) n 

0® 25' 



29® 34' 



70 52' 



c? vr 

2© 26' 



? ^ 
29® 89' 



9 K 
T" 37' 



Here we have the Q in H in a to the radical \^ ; Saturn 
)>y period nearly in semiquartile to the radical Q.-— $ in exact 
D to T2 at birth; and lastly the ]) justentering the sign Hf 
the opposite sign to her place in the horoscope, and within a 
week's celestial motion of the violent and malignant conjunc- 
tion of ^2 > the samaevil planet who at the instant of birth by 
his anaretical rays forbade the duration of that inestimable 
life, which was so highly prized by the generality of the Eng- 
lish nation. 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



183 




This nativity is remarkable on account of the sing'ular satel- 
litioin of stars in the sign vji in mundane A to the ascendant; 
the native is the son of a fortunate and respectable citizen (a 
student in Astrology). — From the configurations of 7/ ¥ and 
^ , there can be no doubt but the child is bom to be very famous 
and noted in life for his talents in music or elegant scientific 
acquirements. — He will however have a dangerous accident in 
his eleventh year, from the ascendant to the f T? ; but in his 
nineteenth and twentieth years will rise to great eminence, and 
be remarkably prosperous, in whatever sphere of life he may 
be placed, from the excellent nature of the operating directions, 
and other celestial causes, at that period of his life. The very 
remarkable configurations in the above horoscope are worthy 
of the student's attention. 



184 



A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 



0amit9 9S u jmp^em ^uttrital ipoet. 




• The recent produetioD of this " alodera Juvenalist" (as some 
have teraied him) hayiog excited much curiosity in the literary 
world, is the author's chief reason for inserting his horoaeope. 
The stndient will readily perceive the close zodiacal A of the 
]) with ^ , and the planet $ arising in ttg in parallel to ^ , 
as the cause of his being a pdet ; but the desire for the««fra-^ 
ordinary f which his satirical talent evinces, is solely produced 
by the almost perfect semiquartile of the D and ](^« which never 
fails to give originality of genius, as we have previously ob- 
served in a former part of the work, we predict that " the ea- 
thor of the age reviewed" is destined to great telBhriiy m ike 
twenty-s^econd year <if his Itfe, probably by some eminent 
ejection of his poetical genius ! 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGT. 



185 



i^attDtt^ of a evtat ^raDeUer. 

AND CLEVER LINGUIST. 




The above horoscope is that of a gentleman, who has tra- 
velled over the greater part of Europe, Asia, and Africa — who 
by his exertions, aided by good fortune alone, has arisen (from 
humble origin) to occupy many distinguished stations, and to 
have many eminent friends. The student will perceive the 
fortunate position of the O in ^ the sign of his greatest forti- 
tude, with ip and ^ also angular, near to the zenith ^ being 
in close '^ to ^ ; this latter position has caused him to excel 
in the study of the languages, whereby he became k self- taught 
interpreter to the Duke of Devonshire and Sir George Nayler 
at the late coronation in Moscow. — The T> in the moveable 
sign s in the ninth house is a noted sign of travelling and 
voyages. — This nativity predicts both titular and lasting honors. 



186 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

0tAi!ii>ttp tit a 0Hi>ui iBtntltmm 




The nativity of the above gentleman is inserted^ on account 
of the strange eventfulne89 of his life. — He was born to all 
appearance dead; once nearly drowned; (being brought up 
senseless) he has fought two duels, and been shot through 
both thighs, with many other narrow escapes from death. — He 
is a gentleman of fortune ; but singularly unhappy in marriage. 
The Astrological causes of this strange variety of incidents are 
plainly perceptible, when we look at the circumstance of T^ 
O $ and ^ , being in the angle of the west, opposed to the 
} and ^ ; and from the hurtful signs n and f , which as we 
have before observed, give danger through gun-shot wounds, 
and imminent danger of a violent death in whatever horoscope 
they may occur. 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



L87 



0Atimp ota^tvsion ta^o Bitrt Sn^ant^ 




The above nativity is inserted chiefly to prove the truth 
of the directions by Celestial Periods. At 22 years 228 days 
after birth F? arrives at 13^ 51' n> the exact place of the 
O ; and the ]) in 10^ of 15?, within 4*> of Tj • The nativity 
was cast by a pupil of the author's (when the native was well 
in health, and to all appearance long-lived) who under his 
guidance calculated the directum of death, the ascendant to the 
a of T2 being the fatal arc ; with the above periodical rays, 
and predicted her approaching dissolution. — ^The signs of insa- 
nity are the (f of ]) ^ and D of each to J^, from s ^ and 
Vf^and the U o( Q ^ from irj and n. These never fail to 
produce such unfortunate catastrophes. The above horoscope 
exhibits a singular and luminous instance of Astral agency. 



)88 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGYi 



THE NATIVITY OF THE ILLUSTRIOUS WARRIOR, 

Z^t muHt of WltUinston. 

From the Author's " Prophetic Messenger for 1828." 




'< There was a sound of rev«lry by night. 

And Belgium^s capital had gather'd then 
Her beauty and her chivahry, and bright 

The lamps shone o*er fair women and brave men ; 
A thousand hearts beat happily ; and when 

Music atose with its vokiptaotts swell. 
Soft eyes looked love to eyes wkicfa spake again, 

And all WetH merry as a marriage bell ; . 
But hush ! Jtark ! a deep sound strikes like a in&m^knelL 



GENETHLIACAL ASTJIOLOGY. 189 

Did ye not hear it ?— "JVb ; 'twas but the wind, 

Or tlie car rattling o'er the stony street ; 
On with the dance ! let joj be unconfined ; 

No sleep tiU morn> when youth and pleasure meet 
To chase the glowing hours with flying feet — 

But hark I that heavy sound breaks in, once more, 
As if the clouds its echo would repeat; 

And nearer, nearer, deadlier than before ! 
Arm ! arm ! it is — it is*T-the cannon's opening soar. 

Ah ! then and there, was hunying to and fro, 

And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress ; 
And cheeks all pale ; which but an hour ago 

Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness ! 
And there were sudden partings, such as press 

The life from out young hearts, and choking sighs 
Which ne*er might be repeated ; who could guess 

If ever more should meet those mutual eyes. 
Since upon nights so sweet, such awful mom could rise. 

And there was mounting in hot haste ; the steed, 

The mustering squadron j and the dattering car. 
Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, 

And swiftly forming in the ranks of war ; 
And the deep thunder peal on peal afar ; 

And near the beat of the alarming drum, 
Housed up the soldier, 'ere the morning star, 

While thronged the citizens, with terror dumb, 
,Or whispering with white lips — the foe ! they come ! they come ! 

Last noon beheld them full of lusty life ! 

Last eve in beauty's circle proudly gay ! 
The midnight brought the signal sound of strife, 

The mom the marshalling in arms — the day 
Battle's magnifidently stem array ! 

The thunder clouds close over it ; which when rent 
The earth is cover*d thick witli other day, 

Which her own day shall cover, heaped and pent^ 

Rider and horse— friend— foe — tfi one red burial blent V' 

Btrov. 



190 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. ' 

" Such were the extraordinary positions of the heavenly bodies 
at the birth of the noble Dake of Wellington ; born under the 
cardinal sign Capricorn, with Saturn the lord of his ascendant, 
both cardinally and angularly posited in the house of war and 
battle, born also under the exaltation of the 6ery Mars ; with 
Jupiter, the author of greatness and renown, riches and ho- 
nors, strong in the mid-heaven, in a zodiacal trine to Mars, the 
Moon and Saturn, with the Sun on the very cusp of the lower 
heaven, in sextile to the natal stars, and closely parallel to Ju- 
piter, in fixed signs, with ^\q planets in the principal angles of 
the celestial horoscope, at the same time that the bright star 
Sirius, of the first magnitude, was setting in the west.— What 
wonder that his nanae should demand so proud a place in the 
annals of history, for his most fortunate warlike achievments ? 

The time of his birth was obtained from his nearest relative, 
some few years since, by a gentleman of eminence in the arts, 
and is here inserted without the least alteration. The correct- 
ness of the time the following celestial arcs of direction will 
prove. 

Vrs. months. 

The Ascendant to the (^ ]) 37 Marriage. 

]) lo ^ (^ in the zodiac 38 9 7 Campaigns in PortugaU 

O to (^ $ in the zodiac 39 7 J Battle of Yimiera. 

The Mid-heaven to the A <? 41 Battle of Buzaco. 

r Battle of Ciudad Ilodrigo 
}) to •)(- T2 in the zodiac 43 l) Badajos 

C Salamanca. 

^ o . , ,. ( Battles of Vittoria, 

G to ^ § in the zodmc 44 1 gebastian. &c. 

* 

]) to her own •}(- in the zodiac 46 r Battle of Toulouse, and 
The Ascendant to the A ^ 46 ( Triumph at Waterloo. 

The foregoing arcs will sufficiently evince the surprising ve- 
rity and singular accuracy of Astrological calculations) when 
founded on the correct time of birth, and mathematically eluci- 
dated. I have chosen the nativity of this illustrious native, in 
preference to others, as the subject thereof is now living, and, 
consequently, all possibility of making up any fictitious horos- 
cope is at once set aside ; thus affording me a most ' powerful 



GENETHLIACAL ASTROLOGY. 



191 



shield against the insidious representations of the envious and 
ignorant traducer of this sublime science. 

I shall finish my observations^ by remarking that there is a 
singular agreement between the nativities of our most sacred 
Majesty and the noble duke. The Tang of England having 
both the Moon and Jupiter nearly on the actual place of the Sun 
in the duke's horoscope. Another extraordinary proofs if any 
were wanting (to the unprejudiced) that the heavenly bodies 
most certainly govern the destinies of the most powerful^ as well 
as of the meanest individuals. I conclude by wishing (as a 
lover of splendid warlike achievements) " all health and hap- 
piness to the Hero of Waterloo \" 

Prophetic Messenger, page 40. 

In addition to the above, it may be considered as a singular 
fact, that although Napoleon and Wellington were each born 
in the same year, yet there existed the greatest discordance in 
their horoscopes.— In Napoleon Buonaparte's nativity, the pla-r 
Xiets were thus posited : 



a 

22© 4' 



29° 18' 



S 



25^ 47' 



12*» 8' 



15® 9' 



7^ 



s 









The student will readily perceive the powerful disagreement 
between the two nativities, when compared together ; upon 
which we need not descant any farther at present : yet it may 
be certainly adduced as another proof of the celestial science^ 
and a proof defying all contradiction, since the premises on 
which it is founded must be granted, even by the most stubborn 
incredulist ; and when those are granted, the conclusion is as 
self-evident as a syllogistic proposition in logic. 



192 



A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 



THE NATIVITY OF 



et^e f^ounu ''mmof^tmt. 



yf 




'* When the hiow of the w8rrior lies dironcled in gloom. 
And the sage has gone down to the depths of the tomb, 
And the tongue of the poet is silent and coId» 
And the statesman has pass'd ' like a tale that is told,' 
Yet their deeds the proud record of memory saves, . 
And the radiance of glory shines bright on their graves ! 
The meed of the mighty is blazon*d on high. 
It is not the doom of the famous to die.'* 



GENKTHLIACAL ASTROLOGT. 193 

Napoleoh , the late nii^htj and pidssant hot Mien eapeior 
of the French nation, whose wishes were the mandate and laws 
of half the wwld (England excepted) hong- in secret a pro- 
found helieTO* in the Sidereal science ; and even in pnhlic ** an 
obserrer of times and seasons/' it is said, was paiticolarlY 
anxioos to obtain the exact moment of his beloved son's nati- 
vity. Omseqnently^ the stndent will presmne opon the avlAai- 
ftctf jf of the horoscope, which the following* celestial ares will 
proye, as they are calculated with all possible correctness. 

Yn. Hths. 

O in exact mundane sesqoiqaadrate to cf at birth. 

} to the a S in mundo, direct.. •••• 15 5 

T; to the <f D by celestial periods • • • • 1 7 li 

O to the D l2 in mundo, converse.. •• 18 

Ascendant to the ^ T2 • • ^^ ' 

O to the -}(- )^ in mnndo, converse • • . • 20 4 

Mid-heaven to the ^ 1/ ;... 28 3 

The O in Astrology is known to every stndent to be a parti- 
cular significator of the father, and being in this horoscope 
so highly afflicted, both by the zodiacal D of Tj , and the mun- 
dane sesquiquadrate of (^ , is an astonishing instance of Astral 
agency, and proves how far the influence of the heavenly bodies 
extends over all sublunary affairs ; which may be seen in every 
case, where the correct time of birth can be obtained. 

At first sight it may be presumed, that as the native is bom 
with $ near the cusp of the mid-heaven, he is fated to honors 
of an extensive nature. — This is however by no means the case, 
for $ is highly vitiated by a semiquartile aspect of T^ , and the 
O ; and a a of 1^ ; while § is in n to (J, from bicorporeal 
signs, which increases the mischief. Hence, we cannot hesitate 
to predict, that had the native been even the lawful heir to the 
throne of France, he would never have inherited it ; for al- 
though he certainly possesses a great share of acuteness, and is 
even bom (from the ^ of the J to ^J , and the a of (J and J ) 
with strong military propensities, yet he is not destined to act 

any conspicuous part in the great mundane drama of Europe ; 

N 



194 A MANUAt OP ASTROLOGY. 

ftnd the O being so highly Titiated> with T^ angular^ implies 
but few opportunities of obtaining glory or honor. The ^ 
of O c^nd V imdoabtedly assists powerfully in warding off per- 
sonal dangers ; but in noTespect is the nativity illustrions. — The 
Bourbon government^ therefore, have no cause to fear any in- 
surrection in his favour ; were there any such, it would but 
involve the leaders thereof in a host of diflScnlties. Indeed, it 
was quite easy to see Arom the moment of his birth, that a most 
extraordinary downfal awaited his family. In private life, the 
native will be much esteemed, as he undoubtedly is a youth of 
considerable talent and genius ; yet liable to rashness, and ex- 
tremely prepense to anger, (which arises from the D of (^ and 
^ ). The configurations in hi$ horoscope, when near eighteen 
years old, may be expected to give the death of a near relation, 
with indisposition or accidents to himself.-^Also, in his twenty- 
first year, the ascendant to the opposition of Saturn, denotes an 
accident probably by a fell from a horse, or by fire-arms ; and 
likewise ill health, with mortality among his relations. — But if 
he survives these, the remaining directions are far more pros- 
perous ; as far as his happiness and cdmfort in private life are 
concerned. — The M. C. to the •)(- of V ^^ ^he twenty-ninth 
year of his life> is one of the best configurations he could pos- 
sibly have» and will doubtless produce very beneficial effects. 



Zt^ 0<umitp Qf f^t irtng of 6nglatUir. 

As aJUegieficaffiy depictured hy the descent of Mercury* (his rtdingpkmetj 
from the etherial regions j thus beautifiUfy described by MiUon. 

« So spake the eternia Father, find fulfiU'd 
All justice : nor delayed the winged saint 
After his charge received ; but from among 
Thousand celestial ardors, where he stood 
VeilM with his gorgeous wings, up springing light. 



* Vide, the illustrated horoscope, fronting page 141. 



GEKETHLIACAL ASTRQLOGT. ^^ 

nemiknrikewuiaicfHiiKtn: tiK a^-dic cbmR, 

€kk ach hud ptttmg,to his speed gave vay 

Thioagli aU die emp jxcel raed ; till»at the fftie 

Of Hem'D amvd, ihe gMt adf optned vide 

On golden hingei timing, as by vark 

JXvine the sovereign ardiilect had fiamM* 

Down thither prone in fljgjht 

He qweds, and through the vast edmial tky 

Sails between worlds and woild$» with steady wing 

Now on the Polar winds, dien with quidt ftn 

Winnows the buxom air : till, within soar 

Of towering ca^es, to aH the fowls he stems 

A Phoenix, gaz'd by aH : at length, 

He lights, and to his proper AiKpt retunis 

A seraph wingM ; six wings he wore to shai)e 

His lineaments divine : the pair that dad 

£adi shoulder broad, came mantling o*er his bitast 

With regal ornament : the middle pair 

Cirt like a starry zone his waist, and round 

Skirted his loins and thighs with downy gold. 

And colours dipt in heaven : the third his feet 

Shadow'd^from either hed with feather'd mail, 

Sky tinctur'd grain. Like Malays son he stood, 

And shook hii plumes, that heavenly ftagranoe tiU'd 

The circuit wide. Straight knew him all the bands 

Of angels under watch : and to his stale > 

And to his message high, in honor rise : 

For on some message high they gueM*d him bound.** 

As we have already given our opinion of this illuitrioui anti 
regal nativity " in the Astrologer of the nineteenth century," (to 
which we refer the reader) repetition ii superfluous, save to 
again remark, that the horoscope is replete with wonderful 
verifications of planetery influence.— ilnd England canrwt but 
prosper, while she is blessed with the mild and beneficent $wa\i 
vf this potent monarch. 



IM A MANUAL O.F ASTROLOGY. 



fl^orar^ fH^tvtAnQp } 



OR THE ART OP 



RESOLVING PARTICULAR QUESTIONS 



UPON THE MOST IMPORTANT AFFAIRS 



OP HUMAN LIFE. 



jBy a Theme of Heaven. 



^^ Wt mutt ky uidtt that laiy and Mtmkm method of eenmiiig by Ae faunp^ 
and miMl bring thingi dose to the tot of tme or ftlw." 

Bu«jrBTT*8 Theobt. 

** QM^ poner, aoft hmoty, miii ^oils and 
InoiNii UM WQndi and naie «he akk to 
Few ftftufy Heaven, unnindfbl ef Abk 
Vain triftii« man ! bat CAitHself «&!»!* 



The lort of resoWii^ honrj qoestioiis, is fomded m the 
jMilAftiit propetties irhich ue fbimil to exist, aoie or less 
thfo^jjrlKMt nutwe^ It tenuslies the stadmt u stuir scioiee, 
>9ritK tW iicIimI nesuK of S9iti:^iE^ tiiose do«bts to wluch tiie 
wiuiib of Ul M^ttm s«ib|eH« brui s|)ipueiithr suB|>leaBd eesj, 
Vnt K^nliM tkeoijr^ whieli p«««nMes tint tliesaaespBinlb^ic 
I^YCi^r wKkli t«^is<s tW iioii sand as^vet to attnci sad e^^ 
^cK olWr-^wKkli <msE«$» di^t»cked pcntioa of cMrtli «» lemn 
t\^>iciui^ tW coaMM>« c««U^ : tke waleB oC tlie ocesas to ap- 
|Niv>gK^ tW hwMi\mnpieiT> ; t^K^i^^MHstoieTohvtme^kHiinlcacla 



HORARY ASTROLOGY. '^7 

• • • . 

towards the pole ; which causes the turbalence of wine at the 
time of vintage — which by occolt sympathy iofloencei the no- 

• • • 

born foetus in the womb, and produces correspondent marks' 
with the mother's wants or fears ; the same sympathetic instinct 
which induces the child to approach the nipple ; the mother to 
feel the draught flow into her breasts some seconds before the 
infont awakes for its destined food — ^which causes the husband 
to feel the pain of gestation alternately with his wife ; which 
induces animals to feel the approach of changes in the atmos- 
phere, and thus to foretel rain ; which induces rats to forsake a 
foiling house ; ants to quit their nests, and remove their yoong 
before an inundation; dogs to foretel mortality by strange 
barkings and winnings. — ^The same occolt influence whidi 
drives the frantic herd aboot the pastores ; which provokes the 
gad-fly to vex the steed ; which goads and rooses the hoge 
ork, slombering in the lowest gnlpbs of the great deep ; caosing 
him to rise and toss vast foontains to the cloods — ^which fetches 
troops of frogs from the muddy bottom of the oozy lake, and 
compels them to take land joameys — ^which caoses the annoal 
migration of iHrds — ^which leads the slow creeping snail to on- 
warp its oneooth body, and proudly throst forth its long boms ; 
which is the toscin of alarm that odls forth the sleeping beetle 
from its deep loridng hole — which seizes with fits of temporary 
madness, the owl and the raven ; which affects the brains of the 
maniac, or whidk dreuitUimg through all Iwimg nature, perva^ 
ding all, ditquieting all, even to the minotest swarms that foil 
in honey dews : when the sky means to lower, this mmiversal 
0fmpaihjf or instinct (for all instinct s» sympathy) is oettber 
more n<Mr less than the secret bot poweifol infloeoees of the 
heavenly bodies: and is the Jbrsi prevailing caose of every 
anjrums and ardent doobt to which the mind is ^object, or open 
which the mind dwells with eagerness, and a desire, if possible, 
to know the result — ^Natore, in this case, will be foond to ae- 
commodate henelf to every emeigeocy, and by a theme of 
Heaven, cast to the moment when the desire is most aideat, or 
when the querent feels WMt amarwrns (and irritable) on the 
subject. — From that position of the heavenly bodies, whea 
judged by the rules of art, may a true answer undoubtedly be 



td8 A MANUAL OF ASTEOLOGT. 

obtained ^ and the Tarioiis coBtiiig;eiides^ relative thereto, may 
also be laithfally diieovemL 

It is possible that the medioa throog^h whidi this infloence 
operates, and which caoses distant portions of matter to operate 
OB each other, may in aQ probability consist of a very line elastic 
and subtle fluid, whidi emanates thioog^h ininite sp^ee, being* 
wholly imperceptible, except by its efl'ecti ; and thos apparently 
vnaeeoufUaUe, were it not attribnted to celestial agency ; bbt 
which, to a belicTer in Astrology, appears nothings more than 
the ordinary but unerring^ laws of nature. — ^Thos this species 
of divination (if any thing which has certain demonstrable 
rules for its basis may be so termed) notwithstanding the silly, 
oommon^plaoe, jeering, and the foolish ndicnle of self-conceited 
witlings, is really fonnded on the same immntable laws to which 
the universe, at lai^gej is subject 

In Older to be perfect in this part of Jadicial Astrology, it is 
absolotely necessary to be master of the following' technical 
terms, which the author has rendered as concise as possible ; 
but at the same time he has given every requisite explanation. 

APPLICATION. 

Applieaium is when two planets apply or go to each other's 
aspect, where, according as we have before described, it must 
be well observed, that the lig^ht planets apply only to the more 
ponderous: the following are the 

Orbs of Applieation. 

^ 9 degrees. 

11 12 degrees. 

(J 7 degrees. 

O 17 degrees. 

S 8 degrees. 

5 7 degrees. 

J 12 degrees. 



HORARY ASTROLOGT. 199- 

In practice, these degrees are said to denote the distance at 
which a planet may operate, from a partile aspect^ before it 
quite loses its effects. 

Direct application, is when two planets are direct, or move 
according to the order of the zodiacal signs, and one applies to 
the other. Retrograde application, is when both planets are 
retrograde, and move contrary to the order of the signs of the 
aodiac, applying to each other. Mixed application, is when 
one planet being direct, and the other retrograde, they yet mu- 
taally apply by aspect. 

The two first of these applications are deemed the best ; but 
in all cases it must be seriously considered, whether the aspect 
is approaching or receding, which leads us to treat next of 

SEPARATION. 

Sepctration is when two signifieators have lately been in as- 
pect, and the aspect is just over; thus were 71 posited in l^;:s , 
and Tj in 6^ t , they are applying by aspect ; but if 11 instead 
of this were in 8^cs, and V^ still in 6ot, the aspect is over ; 
7/ having separated from the configuration of T; » which in all 
cases is of great importance to know ; as application is the sign 
whereby events are denoted to take place, and separation de- 
notes what has passed or taken place, whether in good or evil.. 

DIRECT AND RETROGRADE MOTION. 

Direct as applied to planets, denotes their moving in the 
true order of the celestial signs, as from T to ^ , and the like. 
Retrograde^ is when they move backwards, or reverse to this 
order, as from T to ){ , which is easily known by the Ephe- 
meris. 

PROHIBITION. 

Prohibition, i$ so called, when two planets are applying by 
aspect to each other ; but before the aspect can possibly be 
formed, a third planet interposes his aspect, and thus hinders 
or prohibits the matter in hand : thus, were $ in 4^ of , 1/ 
in 6® of s, and g in 5^ of irp. Here ? applies to a ^ of 



200 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

11 ; but before she can complete the aspect, $ being swifter 
in motioQvOUtstrips $ , and by forming the ^ himself, joroAt- 
bita the affair, which to the matter in hand, would caose a com- 
plete cessation ; and that person signified. by ^ , would describe 
^the party through .whose interference the matter .would be 
nullified. 

REFRANATION. 

■ 

Refranati(m,is when two planets are applying to an aspect ; 
but before the aspect can be completed, one of them turns 
retrograde, which in practice^ is fatal to the success .of the 
4]uestion. 

RECEPTION. 

Reception is when two planets are mutually posited in each 
other's essential dignities, as ^^ in T ^ and the in s > where 
7/ being in the exaltation of the Q, and the Q in the exalta- 
tion of 11 , both are in mutucd reception ; or the O i>^ T^ s^nd 
1/ in Q , are in reception, one by house, the other by triplicity. 
This is accounted an aspect of singular amity and agreement. 

PEREGRINE. 

Peregrine, is when a planet is void of any essential dignity ; 
and thus is rendered weak and unfortunate. 

■ 

VOID OF COURSE. 

Void of Course, is when a planet forms no aspect whatever 
with any other planet, during his stay in th^ sign Wherein he 
is posited. This is particularly evil in certain cases, as it ren- 
ders the conclusion of the affair extremely uncertain. 

COMBUSTION. 

' Combustion, is when a planet is posited within 8° SO' of the 
O, either before or after theO's body. In horary questions, 
unless the O he a chief significator, this is deemed unfortunate. 
The J is singularly weak when so elongated. 



HORAKT ASTSOLOGT. 301 

In Horary Qiteatuma, 

This Heasnre of Time the following Diagnm will kt odc« 
clearly exhibit 





V SUCCEIDENTI. ^/\ CaDBNTS. /^ 

\ Mo«mbk.igni,»«*i./ \ MoM«bl».Uo..«»(*... / 
"X commuQ cig»l. / Anqles. X commOD ii«ni.|i«r»j / 
■g a\ mvnlhi: &!.- / MoTMbl«tigni\fi»«' "«'»■ «■"/ J 
S E i\ ed "iKOi, / giTt doy. : common \ iw"'"*. / H j „ 
e5%3 \lr«"/.i,n^„„*.,.fi,«|.ig„.\ / ailc 


111 

*/ Mo«.b 

/iiio»«*i,con 

/ reari; fixed li 


A DIAGRAM 

To measure the Arcs of the 
Si^DificatoT, 

In Horary 7%emea 
Of Hearen. 


If 

ilfirX 

my 

■ •if HI, X.-- 

mon ligni. X. 
•ign», gtari. X 




X. MoTMble tigni gifi / 
X <''l"' tommon / 

'ni.tmHnJMii. \ / mcnllu, fi»d 




1 



To understand the foregoing diagram, the student most ob- 
serre that a significator posited in moveable signs and angular, 
gives for every degree in loDgitude one day ; in a common sign 
angular, one week ,- and in a fixed sign, one month ,• thus, for 
instance, were 11 in the ascendant in 14° of r in application 
to a A of ^ in the fifth house in 1 Q° of s . his dratance (tho 
intercepted arc) between the aspect being 2°, would denote 



202 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

two days 'ere the event, denoted by his application to T^ > would 
be likely to take place ;^ and Were he in the ninth house^ in the 
same aspect, the time* would be two mopths. The remainder 
of the diagram is on the same principles ; and by a reference 
thereto, on any particular occasion, considerable facility \^ill 
be afforded to the practitioner, or amateur, in the horary part of 
the science,.and the memory will be thus far less liable to those 
mistakes which are found usually to happen when it is over- 
charged. 

BESIEGED. 

Besieged is when a planet, fortunate by nature, is situated 
between two malevolent stars, as $ in 12^ of s , 1^ in 15^, and 
^in 10^ of the same sign ; where she is in a state of *' siege,'' 
as the old Astrologers term it, and highly unfortunate. He 
whose significator it was, would be denoted thereby to be in 
'^ a great straight," and particularly *' hemmed in" or surrounded 
with ill fortune. 

SIGNIFICATOR. 

The significator of any party is that planet which rules, or 
has dominion by celestial home, over that part of the figure or 
scheme, peculiar to the business in hand. Thus were the ques^ 
tion about money, the lord of the second house of heaven is the 
chief significator of the matter ; and his good or evil aspects 
must be well observed, ere the answer can be faithfully given. 

QUERENT AND QUESITEP. 

The Querent is the party who proposes the question, the 
Quesiied the party of whom the enquiry is made. In horary 
questions, as before observed, the ascendant is invariably given 
to him who asks the question, if un-elated ; but if related, the 
lord of that house which has signification of the relationship. 
Its various contingencies are shewn as before. 



HORARY ASTROLOGY. 209 



DRAGON'S HEAD. 

The Q is used by most authors in the symbols relating^ to 
horary questions. It is accounted of the nature of the fortunes ; 
11 and f being* supposed to increase the good, when found 
with good planets ; and with evil planets^ the contrary. 

DRAGON'S TAIL. 

The 8 is the reverse, being esteemed by the Arabian and 
Persian Astrologers as astonishingly " evil, noxious, and hate- 
ful in influence," in all questions. 

THE PART OF FORTUNE. 

The in horary questions, is said to denote the personal 
money of the querent ; and is calculated, by adding the sign, 
degree, and minute, the ]) is in, to the sign, degree, and minute 
of the horoscope, or first house. — From which must be suh^ 
traeted the true place of the Q, taken in the same manner ; 
the remainder will be the true place of the 0. 

ExAHPLE.-«-Suppose the cusp of the horoscope to be 10^ 
40'Vf, the J in 8® I2'r, and the © in 2^4'r, what is the 
place of the ? 

Signs o ' 

Place of the ]) 8 12 
Place of the Horoscope +9 10 40 



Sum 9 18 52 
Place of the O 2 4 



Place of the © 9 16 48 or 16«> 48' of yf . 

When subtraction cannot be made without^ twelve signs 
must be added, or if more than twelve signs remain, twolv^ 
signs must be subtracted, to give the true result. 



204 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



PARTICULAR SIGNIFICATIONS 



OP THE 



%oxn^ of t|)e ^tmit^. 



ACCORDING TO THE ORIENTAL ASTROLOGERS. 



In the Different Celestial Houses. 

Id the 1st. A fortunate life, and power over enemies. 

2Dd. Riches, by his personal industry. 

3rd. Voluntary short journeys. 

4th. Good fortune in lands and inheritances. 

5th. A propensity to gaming, and a large family. 

6th. A sickly life. 

7th. The querent is his own adversary. 

8th. Legacies, or money by the wife. 

9th. Long voyages and journeys. 
lOth. Great honor and preferment. 
11th. A great number of friends. 
12th. Secret unhappiness and fear of imprbonment. 

ei^e itotti of t^t ^nonn fB^ousfe* 

In the 1st. Riches and good fortune. 
2nd. Wealth and Prosperity. 
3rd. Gain by travelling or neighbours. 
4th. Legacies and riches by the father. 
6th. Naturally denotes riches by gaming, and youth- 
ful persons. 



THE LORDS OP THE MOUSES. "^Ctt 

6th. Bj riches, infenor pefsons, or sanJl beftsls. 

7th. By ridies, marriage, or public bosiness. 

8th. Riches by legacies, or by the dead. 

9th. Wealth by religion or long jootneya, and science. 
10th. Wealth by trade or merchandise, or the govenn 

ment. 
11th. Money by friends. 
12th. Gain by great cat|le» and secret arts. 

et^e %ntn of tj^e Z'^itn f^un^t. 

In the 1st. Many journeys and remoTals. 
2nd. Riches by the same. 
3rd. Gain by brethren and peregrinations. 
4th. Travelling for possessions or estates. 
5th. Pleasant joarneys. 
6th. Sickness through joarneys. 
7th. Denotes marriage by travelling. 
8th. Death while travelling. 
9th. Extensive joarneys. 
10th. Mercantile or professional journeys. 
11th. Good friends while absent. 
12th, Danger of enemies^ and imprisonment while tra* 
veiling ; and denotes his brethren or kindred to 
be deceitful. 

€^t %ttif of t^t ifourtj^ H^ott^e. 

In the 1st. A fortunate inheritance. 

2nd. Purchase of estates. 

3rd. Estates or money through brethren. 

4th. Estates through the father, or entailed property. 

5th. Denotes his estate to descend to his offspring. 

6tb. Loss of money, or an estate, by servants or sick- 
ness ; but is very gainful for a physician or 
medical man. 

7th. Estates by marriage. 



206 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

8th. Legacies or estate^s by wedlock^ or by an absent 
person* 

9th. Estates by science^ religion, or voyages. 
10th. Estates obtained by trade or profession. 
1 1th. Estates by gifts of friends. 
12th. By dealings in beasts, or oYerooming enemies* 

In the 1st. A propensity to gaming, and many children. 
2nd. Riches by speculations of all kinds. 
3rd. Journeys with, or through, young persons. 
4th. Estates by some discovery or gaming. 
5th. Fortunate in children and speculations. 
0th. Sickness amongst his family. 
7th. Family discord and loss by theft 
8th. In a question denotes death of children. 
9th. His children are born to travel. 
10th. Honorable children, and renown in speculations. 
11th. Friends by means of his family, and pleasant 
friends, or by means of speculations or gaming. 
12th. Unhappiness and enmity by children, and ruin 
through gaming or play. 

etie Eottr of t^t ^i^ ^tm^t. 

In the 1st. Sickness through himself. 

2nd. Loss of money by servants or sickness* 

9rd. Sickness in his shoH journeys. 

4th. Loss of inheritances, and wasteful domestics. 

5th. Sickness by intemperance, and sickly children. 

6th. Good servants or domestics. 

7th. Public law-suits with servants, and sickness. 

8th. Dangerous illness. Death of servants, or small 
beasts. 

9th. Sickness while travelling. 
10th, Sickness through some disgrace. 
11th. Sickness amongst friends, or in his family. 
12th. Imprisonment, or private enemies, by servants. 



THE LORDS OF THE HOUSES. SO? 

In the 1st. Pablic eoemies at hand or mairiage. 

2nd. Gain by marriage. 

3rd. Pablicopponentsamongst brethren orneigfaboars. 

4th. An estate by marriage. 

5th. A qoarrelsome family, or loss by speealations. 

6th. A sickly wife and evil disposed servants. 

7th. He is fortunate in law-suits. 

8th. Money by marriage, but he will lose his wife. 

9th. A marriage with a female from a far distant land, 
and contentions with religious persons. 
10th. An honorable wife. — ^Bnt rivals in his profession. 
11th, Public opponents amongst his friends. 
12th. An unhappy marriage, jealousy and vexation. 

9t^ SotiK tut ti^e ^ifi^i^ ^m^t* 

In the 1st Danger of death by suicide^ or by the querent's 

own irregularity. 
y 2nd. Riches by the dead. 

3rd. Short journeys are dangerous. 
4th. Danger of death by ruinous buildings or falls. 
5th. Unfortunate children, and danger of death by in- 
temperance. 
6th. In a question of sickness it is incurable, 
7th. Death of the wife, or of a public enemy. 
8th. A natural death. — Gain by the dead. 
9th. Death in a distant land. 

10th. In a question denotes death amongst relatives. 
11th. Legacies amongst friends, but also mortality. 
12th. A private enemy will die/ and himself be in some 
excessive fear or anxiety concerning a death. 

Zf^t %Qtii of i^t 0intb f^Ottsle. 

In the 1st. He is likely to travel. 

2nd. Riches by sea, or some particular science^ or thd 
church. 



208 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

3rd. The querent will soon travel or remove* 

4th. Denotes ecclesiastical inheritances. 

5th. Denotes a person given to free living. 

6th. Sickness through travelling. 

7th. Public enemies amongst religious or 'sea-faring 
persons. 

8th. Persecution concerning religion. — Death of the 
wife's kindred. 

9th. The querent will be a traveller. 
10th. Distant preferment by means of his merit. 
11th. He will be fortunate in voyages and journeys. 
12th. Infinite vexation while travelling. 

Zf^t %0vn of t^t ^tnt^^m^t* 

In the Ist. Denotes eminent honor or preferment at hand. 

2nd. Riches by industry or trade. 

3rd. Respect amongst kindred or neighbours. 

4th. Denotes honor and good estate. 

5th. Honor through speculations, and children bom 
to great respectability in life. 

6th. Loss of credit and sickness. 

7th. Honorable connexions by 'marriage. 

8th. Gain by legacies or law-suits. 

9th. Honorable voyages, 
loth. Eminent glory and renown. 
11th. Noble or eminent friends. 
12th. Secret vexation or loss of honor. 



ete Horn ot t^t mtfizn^ ^m^f. 

In the 1st. Friends and supporters are to be expected. 
2nd. By friends he will increase his estate. , 

3rd. In short journeys he will meet friends. 
4th. Inheritances through friends. 
5th. Dutiful children, and gain by speculations. 
6th. Servants are faithful. 



THi; LORDS OF THE HOUSES. 209 

7th A wife whose friendships and connexions are 

desirable. 
8th. Denotes death of friends as near at hand. 
9th. Friends by learning, science or travelling. 
lOth. Honorable friends among the great, 
nth. Valuable disinterest^ed friends. 
12th. Pretended friends who are in reality private 
enemies. 

€f)t %m of t^t zmittif fl^oude. 

In the 1st. Danger of arrest, or imprisonment, is near at hand. 

2nd. Enemies will cause loss of money. 

3rd. Deceitful kindred — vexatious letters or epistles. 

4th. Loss of estate through enemies. 

5th. Vexatious children, and loss by gaming. 

6th« Dishonest servants. 

7th. Law-suits and family discords. 

8th. Death of enemies. 

9th. Vexation concerning voyages or religious persons 
10th. Enemies affecting the credit, 
nth. Deceitful or pretended friends. 
12th. The querent will overcome his enemies. 



By a careful reference to the foregoing positions of the diffe- 
rent rulers in the scheme under consideration, the student will 
be in a short time expert at the solution of any important ques- 
tion ; the houses to which the question belongs are already 
given in another part of this work, to which he must refer, and 
become acquainted with their different denotations in every 
important particular ; by which means he will need no other 
instruction than that which a patient and attentive investigation 
will afford him. — Thus, in a comparatively brief space of time, 
he will be able to resolve almost every anxious question, rela- 
tive to his own destiny, or that of any other person, in a manner 
which the enemies of science have scarcely any conception of, 

O 



il6 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



but which IS notwithstanding founded on sterling truth, and 
which will amply repay the learner thereof for the pains he 
may take in acquiring it. 

To make the matter more plain we will insert the following 
diagram, and afterwards point out the method of giving judg- 
ments. 




]) ab quinUlo % ad g Q), and each to a ^ ^. 



In.the foregoing diagram, the sign Vf ascending, is the sign given 
to the querent or enquirer, and as T^ rules that sign, he is under 
the influence of that planet at the time he proposes the question. 
In a general way the lord of the ascendant being retrograde in 
s , the sign of his detriment in the sixth house, denotes indis- 
positipn, sickness, and great anxiety respecting servants ; l/. 
and (S denotes his pecuniary resources, as ruling the second 



HORARY ASTROLOGY. 211 

house; 11, the former of these planets being in the ninth 
house free from any evil configuration, would denote a respect^ 
able person, and one whose resooroes were sufficient to meet 
his wants ; but ^ , the latter significator, being in the eighth 
house opposite to the second, and disposed of by $ lady of the 
third house, who is found in the twelfth, portends anxiety 
and temporary vexation concerning the money, or well being of 
his kindred, with expenditure in short journeys, but gain in 
merchandise as 11 ruler of the tenth house is found in the ninth, 
and bears rule in the house of wealth. — ^The d of the O and ]> 
in the eleventh house denotes trouble and vexation by means 
of a public opponent, or a law-suit ; wherein, as these planets 
are each disposed of by 11 the lord of the eleventh house, and he 
in the ninth, it promises a fair stout person from a great dis- 
tance (and a religious generous person) will become an active 
friend ; while l^ ruling the twelfth house, denotes his private 
enemies to be in his own power ; and 11 ruling the second, in- 
dicates the means why, namely by means of his large pecuniary 
resources. — $ , lord of the fourth house in the tenths separating 
from a sesquiquadrate ray of Y; and applying to his bi-qnintile, 
indicates some transaction relating to the purchase of lands or 
houses, and a change of residence as naturally to be expected. 
9 in the twelfth house and ruling the eighth, denotes the death 
of a female relative as approaching, and by the measure of time 
already given, it may take place in about Jive months, account- 
ing from the time for which the figure is calculated. (The 
same thing is shewn by the 8 in the third to those who believe 
in its efficacy.) In the accidental significations (see page 109) 
^2 in the sixth house denotes the death of a friend ; and the 
planet H in the ascendant foreshows many strange unexpected 
occurrences, rather vexatious, as about speedily to happen. — in 
particular questions — 

Were the query concerning money generally y it is favourable. 
Were it concerning the expected receipt of money, it is against 
it, as 11 forms no aspects but the A of 1; 9 ^^ before he 
meets the A» ? interposes her <f to fj and thereby proAtW* 
the affair, or at least hinders it for a very long space of time. 
The <f of Tj and $ also denotes a cessation of friendship be- 



212 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

tween a near relation and the party enquiring) with evil intelli- 
gence by letters ; and spiteful neighbours. 

Were the query respecting the obtaining trade or profession, 
&c$ angular, in semisextile to If. denotes money to be requisite 
in the affair, and by such means it might be obtained ; as ^ is 
in bi-quintile to T^ f^^^ % ^^^^ ^^^ eleventh house. 

Were the query concerning the probable success in a lotr- 
6ut7> the querent would tose the day, or have to pay money, as 
^ the lord of the second house is in the house of his opponent's 
wealth, and $ ruling that house fs in his twelfth house.'— But 
the adversary would alfio be near ruin, owing to the position 
of the luminaries in the eleventh house, and ^ accidentally in 
the opponent's second. 

Were it concerning a duel, the challenging party would be 
killed, as the <^ of and D would be fatal, added to ^ in the 
sixth and $ in the eighth house, or house of mortality. 

Were it concerning marriage, no marriage would take place, 
as sickness or death would prevent it. — T^ ralingT the ascen- 
dant, being in the house of sickness and the ]) combust, which 
signifies infinite vexation and defection of friends, from the 
houses these planets rule. 

Were it concernifig children, ^ angular in ^ a bi-corporeal 
sign and 1/ in ti). a fruitful sign, denotes a large family of both 
sexes ; several of whom would be great travellers, but deaths 
and sickness in such a femily would be probable. 

Were the question concerning short journeys, $ going to the 
^ of T2 , denotes all possible misfortune therein, and sickness 
to the wife (if married) while absent. 

If of /ong journeys partial gain would accrue, as ^ is in the 
ninth house, but a death would cause the querent to speedily 
return, bs T^ is retrograde and S ruling the ninth in the house 
of death. 

Were the question of the general state of life, Tj in the sixth 
house denotes sickness by violent colds, danger by water, but 
long life in the end ; as % and \i meet by A aspect before they 
quit the sign — this is seen by the Ephemeris ; yet $ meeting 
the ^ an evil aspect first, denotes great and lasting troubles, 
and fear of imprisonment or great scandal through a female 



HORARY ASTROLOGY. 2^3- 

neighbour ; but $ angular^is a testimony of his being led to 
expect an active, public life, yet but few real friends. 

In this symbolical system of judgment, where events are tii- 
dicated (not caused strictly speaking,) ^/le lords of ectck house 
being directed longitudinally, or by their motion in the zodiac, 
void of latitude and the arcs equated by the measure of time, 
which the diagram, page 201 > exhibits, will also show the va- 
rious events that will happen : thus for instance, ^ , lord of the 
second house, is going in the next sign to a (^ of ^ , a fortu- 
nate star ; this aspect being about 7} degrees distant, denotes 
some particular gainful event, (unexpected at the time of the 
figure being set) in about 7|- weeks time, and partly by means 
of a friend. — 1^ approaching a retrograde A of 7/ being nearly 
eleven degrees distant, denotes the same thing in about eleven 
months reckoned from the time the figure was cast ; but pror 
yious to this his J^ to $ as before said, acts powerfully in evil. 

In all cases, the student will bear this in mind ; that the ho- 
rary system of judicial Astrology presumes the end or final issue 
of every contingency may be foreseen, either by a figure erected 
for the occasion by one whose mind is interested and anxious 
therein, or by casting a figure for the exact time of its com^ 
mencement ; and this rule holds good in every undertaking ; 
as a few examples which we shall give will illustrate. The 
first possible beginning, of course, is in these cases absolutely 
necessary to be known, such as in aquatic or other buildings when 
the first pile or stone is laid, to that time must the theme of 
heaven be erected. — And in journeys, the instant of time the 
party sets out ; or in sea voyages, the exact time the vessel is 
unmoored and floats freely in her wonted element. 

The first figure we shall give is the horoscope of a grei^t 
national undertaking : 



'' On each side an imperial dty stood 
With towers and temples proudly elevate.'* 



214 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



THE 



Wftxtiiitm of m 0m EoniKon astmge 



./ 



a This ancient city, 

How wanton sits she 'midst nature^s smiles; 
Nor from her highest turret has to view, 
But golden landscapes and luxuriant scenes, 
A waste of wealth, the storehouse of the world." 



Young. 



h 19. 44 



<^^ 

^w ^ 



: ^' 



^CT^kO 



C6> 



FIRST PILE DROVE, 

Of the New Loodon Bridge, 

March IStli, 1894, 

9h. 21m. A. M. 

Mean Solar Time, 

Taken from the Public Journals 
of the Metropolis. 



,.%• Xx? 



^o<^ 



n. 



"f \ ■'«? ^' V' / V 






s 



5 ab <f O ad-»ac. 
$? Lord of the Ascendant ab A V «"i bi-quintile of <? 
^ jj ? .— □ 1^ ^ .— Sesquiquadrate of Tj cj . 




HORARY ASTROLOGY. ^^5 

As the horoscope of the new London bridge exhibits a most 
remarkable proof of the certain priociples on which the science 
of Judicial Asirdogif is founded, (a science which is built on 
a foundation as certain as ** the firm pillars of the earth/') we 
must first beg* the reader's attention to the following extract 
from that clever old Astrologer, the celebrated William LiUy. 
In his almanack for 1666, he says, " The nineteenth degree of 
n is London's horoscope, and at the foundation of the city the 
O was in twenty-five degrees of the same sign. This is cer- 
tainly true, that when any notable event happens to concern 
that city, the planets are io those degrees, or thoae signs and 
degrees are affected/' &c. &c. 

Now, although, the engineers and architects of the present 
day do not order their buildings '* by the courses of the stars," 
as they did of old, yet it is worthy of observation^ that had 
they employed the most skilful Astrologer to erect an horoscope 
for the occasion, they oould not haye chosen a point of time for 
their great national undertaking, more strictly agreeing with the 
rales of the sidereal art, than the foregoing horoscope evinces ! 
Incredulists and sophists may ridicule this assertion, but such is 
nevertheless the case : for observe, as if to verify the rules given 
by every author who has written on the science ; that Gemini 
is the ascendant of London^ we find, that not only that very 
sign arose at the commencement of the work, but when the first 
pile was driven, the identical degree, assigned as the horoscope 
of the metropolis, also ctscended in the eastern horizon. — Next, 
to the above singular fact, the student will be led to notice the 
excellent position of 1/ in s his exaltation, and in the sign 
of the second house. — The lord of the ascendant is posited in 
a watery sign, separating from.the A of l/[ and applying to a 
bi-quintile aspect of ^J ; ? in the mid-heaven— and more sin- 
grular still ; the work was commenced upon a full Moon, which 
(as the D at that period is increasing in light and thus rendered 
fortunate) in Astrology is generally chosen as an excellent tes- 
timony where circumstances will permit it. 

Independent of the singular fact, which the foregoing proves, 
that every important undertaking, connected with the welfare 
of the British metropolis, has the sign n ascendant, at the time 



210 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

it begins: the stadent will perceive the astonishing number of 
eminent fixed stars^ of the first magpnitade rising within the limits 
of London's Ascendant ; which also proves that the old Astro- 
logers had justifiable grounds for attributing that sign, and those 
degrees thereof, to such a purpose : and as England is justly 
stiled the greatest and bravest nation in the world, and also the 
roost renowned for her maritime power, so London being the 
capital, the head of Albion, is the fountain and grand reposi- 
tory of her almost boundless wealth — Kudjually did the expert 
and renowned sages of former times behold these particulars, 
when they presaged her future grandeur by the discovery of 
that celestial influence, and that peculiar ewistelkUion to which 
she (next under Divine Providence) owes all her greatness ! 

It is both amusing and instructive, to reflect on the changes 
and revolutions which are effected by short-lived man, or rather 
by that grand march of improvement, which is the proudest 
characteristic of social prosperity. All is made subservient to 
his spirit ; he hews down forests, which become spread over 
seas in countless fleets — plains, once barren and deserted, become 
peopled — the hut leads to a cottage —the cottage to a village — 
and villages to splendid cities. Such is civilisation in embryo, 

^* Thames the most lovM of aU the oceans sops 
By his old sire, to his embraces runs, 
Hasting to pay his tribute to the sea 
Like mortal life to meet eternity. 
Though with tliose streams he no resemblance hold 
Whose foam is amber, and their gravel gold. 
His genuine and less guUty wealth t'explore, 
Search not the bottom but survey his shore ; 
O'er which he kindly spreads his spacious wing, 
And hatches plenty for th* ensuing spring. 
Nor are his blessings to his banks confin*d. 
But free and common as the sea or wind. 
When he ta boast or to disperse his stores 
FuU of the tributes of his grateful shores. 
Visits the world and makes both Indies ours ; 
3o that to us no thing, no place is strange. 
While his fair bosom is the world* $ exchange!** 

Drnham. 



HORARY ASTROLOGY. 



217 



®t)e ^ovoHtopz of tj^e ^xt^mt tmovfi 




Whilst we are treating* of horoscopes^ that of the present 
volume must not be neglected ; since its verification will here- 
after tend to strengthen our theory. — In the Author's last work 
he foretold therein of its great success, which it is well known 
has been the case. Indeed the presage has not only been ve- 
rified by its extensive circulation at home, but *' The Astrologer 
of the Nineteenth Century*' has traversed many parts, both of 
India, America, and other remote regions; where the more 
brilliant and costly, but less successful, volumes of its contem- 
poraries have scarcely been heard of — From the above horo- 
scope and the reigning stars, the student will perceive that the 
present book is fated to enjoy celebrity, when probably some of 
the most popular works of the present day will be sunk in th^ 
lethe of public oblivion, and no more remembered in the circle 
of literature. — Sidus adsit amicum» 



^18 A MANUAL OF ASTEOLOGT. 

THE 

®f)eori^ of S)tate gli$trolo8t> ; 

COMPBISING THAT PART OF TH£ 

CELESTIAL SCIENCE 

WHICH RELATES TO THE DESTINIES 

Of Kingdoms, Thrones , arid Empires. 

*< Canst thoa the flky*8 bcDeroIence restraiii* 
And cante the FIdades to sliine in vain ? 
Or, when Orion qiarkks from his sphere. 
Thaw the cold season, and unbind the year? 
Bid Mazzaxoth his destin'd station know, 
And teach the bz^t Aictonis where to glow ?** 

Urania. 

**• The links of the chain of prophecy, to a well informed mind, seem disposed 
in such a mode and succesnon, as to form a rq;nlar system ; all whose parts har- 
monize in one amazing and consistent plan, fuinishing a perfect moral demon- 



stration. 



Dk. Apthorp. 



The theory of that part of judicial Astrology, which more 
immediately refers the grand and magnificent machinery of 
" the heavenly host" to the destinies of nations, rather than to 
the fate of individaals, is well deserving the student's most se- 
rious attention. By means of the light, which this part of the 
suhlimest of all sciences will throw upon the page of future 
history, he may not only develope the causes of those extraor- 
dinary passing events, which are found to occupy the entire 
attention of the political world ; hut he may alike read in the 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 219 

heavens the future fate> either of the mightiest moDarchy, or 
of the humblest principality. Neither will this be diflScult, 
provided he take but the requisite trouble in erecting^ his fig^ures 
or celestial themes, and observing* the etherial revolutions of 
the heavenly bodies, which are the ground work whereon his 
predictions are founded ; and which foundation (without strain- 
ing any part of the metaphor) will be to him as a rock of ada- 
mant, that through ages has lifted its almost eternal head, above 
the dark and troubled waters of bewildered fanaticism and 
gloomy incredulity. 

In the foregoing parts of this work, the author has laid down 
the systematic theory of the general effects universally found by 
Astrologers of all ages, and in every clime, to have operation 
over the earth and its inhabitants ; to which he must refer the 
reader for his data, or first principles. In those, he will find 
recorded the celestial signs and constellations ; which, by long 
experience, are found to govern peculiar countries ; as well as 
the different parts of the great etherial circle, that being di- 
vided into equal proportions, and termed accordingly *' the 
houses of heaven,'' bear symbolical rule in determining the 
particular effects, deduced from Astral agency. — And lest the 
light and frivolous of the present generation, may here be in- 
clined to laugh at, or condemn our theory, it may be mentioned, 
as undeniable facts, well worthy the reader's most serious and 
candid attention, that if we look back to those periods in his- 
tory, when the moral and political state of the nations of the 
earth have been most subject to the horrors of war, the ravages 
of pestilence, or the convulsions of anarchy ; or other impor- 
tant revolutions, attended with direful results— we shall uni- 
versally find that those disastrous events have been immediately 
preceded, or attended, by some extraordinary phenomena, or 
strange appearance in the heavens, as well as by (the natural 
effects of these celestial omens) some extraordinary convulsion 
in the elements of the globe ! 

The ancient philosophers, who were destitute of these means 
of scientific information, which Providence has condescended to ' 
place within (mr reach, were accustomed to consider the visible 
universe as exhibiting ample evidence of the existence of an in- 



2-20 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

visible Almig^hty power: thas Socrates, (in his dialogue with 
Euthedemus) according to Xenephon, has these sablime re- 
marks : "Me who raised this whole universe, and still upholds the 
mighty frame ; who perfected every part of it in beauty and in 
goodness ; suffering none of these parts to decay through age, 
but renewing them daily with unfading vigor, whereby they 
are able to execute whatever he ordains, with that readiness 
and precision which surpasses man's imagination ;— even he — 
the supreme God, who performeth all these wonders, still holds 
himself invisible ; and it is only in his works that we are ca- 
pable of admiring him, 

Ptolemy, "the prince of Astrologers and philosophers/' as he 
is usually termed, (and whose works translated by the Abb6 
Halma, the French government have lately patronized) had 
likewise the same elevated views of the beauty and order of the 
" heavenly host,'' for as he justly observes, " It is manifest to all, 
that a certain power is distributed and passeth through all things 
that are near the earth, from the nature of the firmament ; first 
on the sublunary elements, the fire and air, which are encom- 
passed by and changed with the motion of the firmament, and 
these again encompass the rest, which are also varied according 
to the mutations of the other, the earth and water, with the 
planets and living creatures in them : for the Sun with that 
which doth environ (meaning the starry heavens) governs all 
things that are about the earth, not only by changing the sea"- 
sons, and bringing to perfection the produce of animals, and 
the fruitfulness of plants, the flowing of waters, and the muta- 
tions of bodies — but also causing changes of the day, of heat and 
cold, dryness and moisture, as it hath respect to our meridian. — 
The Moon also, who is the nearest to the earth, distils down 
much influence; by which things animate and inanimate are 
affected and changed, rivers are augmented and diminished ac- 
cording to her light, the tides vary as she rises and sets, while 
planets and animals in whole, or in part, increase and decrease 
with her." 

" In the same manner the stars, fixed and erratic, as they 
keep on their course, cause many appearances about us ; for 
they are producers of heat, and winds, and storms, by which 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 221 

also things on earth are suitably governed ; and their mutual 
configurations (their influence being thereby mixed) produce 
various mutations. But the power of the Sun is; more preva- 
lent^ inasmuch as it is more universal ; the rest (according to 
the variety of their aspects to Sol (do co-operate, or oppose in 
some measure. The Moon doth this more frequently and mani- 
festly, at the syzyges and quadratures ; other stars in longer 
time, and more obscurely ; as they either appear, disappear, 
or decline. — Since these things are so, not only conjoined bo- 
dies are subject to the motion of the stars, but also the buddings 
and perfection of seeds, are framed and formed according to the 
quality with which the ambient is endued. — Now the more ob- 
servant husbandmen and shepherds, conjecturing from the 
winds which happen at the seasons of seed sowing, and gene- 
ration of animals, foreknow the quality of succeeding accidents. 
And in a word, the more universal, and whatsoever comes to 
pass by the more apparent configurations of the Sun, Moon, 
and Stars ; even they who are not skilled in nature foreknow 
by observation alone : for we see, that even they who are igno- 
rant, from observation alone, guess at those things which are 
produced by a greater power: such as that of the Sun and 
more uncom pounded order, and which have each variation by 
the configurations of the stars, and the Moon to the Sun. — 
Yea, some irrational animals have a foreknowledge, as may be 
seen in the mutations of the seasons of the year, of the Spring, 
Summer, and the others ; and moreover in the change of the 
winds. For the most part the Sun is the cause of these, but 
what are not alike simple, but have some small mixture, these 
men do foreknow by accustoming themselves to observe them ; 
as mariners do foresee the coming of storms and blasts of wind, 
which are caused by the rays of the Moon, or the configurations 
of the erratic stars. But these are often deceived, for by rea- 
son of their want of experience, they do not know the times, 
nor the places, nor the courses of the wandering stars — all 
which to be exactly known, conduce to a certain prescience of 
these things." 

In another part of his matchless writings, after deducing the 
exisjtence of the Supreme Being, from the harmony of the uni- 
verse, and the wonderful and beautiful order of its established 



222 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

motions, he remarks with sing^ular sublimity, (andjor a heathen 
philosopher, with sing'ular piety,) " from the conformity which 
is foand in divine things, and the fine order of these propor- 
tions, those who study them will be in love with this divine 
beauty ; and accustom themselves to take it for the model of 
their conduct, by a sort of influence which assimilates to the 
faculties of the soul ; and we thus instructed by the labors of 
those who have applied themselves to this science, strive to 
increase this taste for eternal truths." 

These are sentiments worthy of so profound a genius ; for 
why should not the grandeur and regularity of the work, lead 
also to the reverence and deep admiration of the Almighty and 
alUwise Architect ? Since the matchless and divine order,and 
omnipotent skill displayed throughout " the vast whole," when 
seriously considered, cannot fail to impart a beneficial influence 
to moral order, even amongst mankind in general ; and thus 
the science of Astrology possesses the advantages of combining 
both philosophy and theology together. — ^Who then can deny 
the fact of its conducing, in a most eminent degree, to render 
mankind wiser, happier, and better? 

Another poet of eminence in the remoter ages, who wrote 
on the theory of celestial agency, has the following remarkable 
lines relative to Providence : 



M 



A most convincmg reasoa drawn from sense. 

That this vast fiame is moved by Prmndemee* 

Which like the soul doth eveiy whirl advaiice; 

It must be God^ nor w&s it made by chance, 

As Epicurus dreamt, he madly thought 

This beauteous frame of heedless atoms wrought. 

That seas and earth, the stars and spacious air 

Wbidi fbxms new worids, or doth the old repair, 

fast nseiiom these, and still supplied remain. 

And all must be (when chance shall break the chain) 

DissolvM to these wild principles again ! 

Ahsoxd, and noasense ! Atkeid ust thine eyes. 

And baring Tiew'd the order ofthe skies, 

Tliink (if thou canst) that matter Umdly hurl'd, 

Widioiit a gvide, dnnld fiame this woodrous wodd !** 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 223 

Tempora nrntimiur «io», et mtUamur te ifiif . 

It was by means of this part of Jadicial Astrology, (which 
the ancients contemplated and studied, more than any other 
part of the science,) that the Babylonians, Chaldeans, Syrians, 
Egyptians, Lacedemonians, Persians, and Arabians, ascended 
to the summits of monarchical power, and whereby their names 
and renown became famous and glorious " upon the face of the 
earth." Indeed it is certain that David, the sacred Psalmist, 
was profoundly skilled in these celestial arts; for when re- 
flecting upon the admirable frame of the Divine system, he 
says, " the hearens declare the glory of God, and the firmament 
the work of his hands. — Day unto day uttereth speech, and 
Bight unto night sheweth knowledge. — ^There is no speech 
nor language where their voice is not heard," &c. And also 
Solomon his son, the gifted of heaven, whom we read of in • the 
sacred volume, where it is said that ** God gave him wisdom 
and understanding exceeding much ;" and that '^ Solomon's 
wisdom excelled the wisdom of all the children of the east 
country, and all the wisdom of Egypt," (which last was the 
country where Astrology reached to great perfection.) And in 
the 7th chapter of his Book of Wisdom, he declares that he 
knew ''the circuits of years, and the positions of the stars, the 
beginning and ending and midst of the times ; the alterations, 
and the change of seasons,' ' &c . In fact there still exists a beau- 
tiful monument of Solomon's superior knowledge of the science 
of the stars, in the finely sculptor'd zodiac which is still to be 
seen on the remains of an ancient palace at BcUbec, (of which 
Mr. Wood has given a faithful description) which the author of 
this Work has historical grounds for supposing to be the scite 
of the ancient Lebanon, in consequence of the sculptor'd orna- 
ments of flower-work, pomegranates, lions, oxen, cherubim, &c. 
which were, according to the sacred scriptures, amongst the chief 
decorations of the Jewish temple — (all of which are a^ authentic 
grounds, as an antiquarian would naturally wish, for the esta- 
blishment of any disputed point in historical research) — and 
hence, it may be presumed, that if the most wise and virtuous 
of the ancient worthies, as deduced from the united records of 
both sacred and profane history, have studied and labored in 



224 



A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



this celestial wisdom, it is sufficiently interesting to arrest the 
attention even of the present refined yet somewhat incredalous 
age* — The system of StcUe Astrology shall now be given ; in 
which we observe, in the first place, the path of the San 
through the twelve celestial signs^or zodiacal constellations, to 
each of which a theme of heaven should be cast ; but the more 
eminent practitioners in this science, observe only the quadra- 
tures of the seasons, hence we will treat first of 

OR THE ENTRANCE OF SOL INTO ARIES. 

In the Ephemeris, the day, hour, and minute of the ingress 
of the O in t (which is about the 20th or 21 st of March in 
every year) is correctly noted; and to that precise time the 
theme of heaven must be cast ; in which the following diagram 
will be found eminently usefuL 



5 § ® 8 
o aw, 



The wealth, bank, or excheqaer of 
the goTemmeiit, the fnepdi, 
ri|chta, mMiyna ehmrtm,'— 
and counsellor! of the y THK KINO; 
commoiu or ^ ur the chief macfi- 

Of the nation, alio the 
ariitocncjr. 



The eecletiastical power, and 

the courts of dmioeitf or 

equity, also the turn 

mtreUa power %]£ 

the nation. 



« ■ 



«« n, V 



9 •* >0 



est fill 



BI 



y ** ii *i 
^ 9 Ji -i 
C 



A DIAGRAM 

of the Effects of the 

Twelve Houses of Heaven 

IN" 

STATE ASTROLOGY ; 

Illnstrating the various symbolical 
effects of the Planets, by celestial 
position, according to the 

Most Famous Authors, 



• sr c 



" =. ». ^ 

1 - - a ? 
Si 



O S. ' ~y4 S 

3 He 
£L :r 3" 3 — 
? toBt 



B.S He %a. 



5 - g-o a 



The Isndtd interest of the natioa, 

the public opponents of the 

-,. -v x*fal power, at home or /^ The 

n*i»Kiw».^.. ..»{ V abroad. Tlieiranci- y chief «l|{nifi« 
nelfhboanngnati. X „t,j.fct,o . / tor of the youthful 
ODi in amity whh the X *"* '*" * /or ritbia aenetation the 

people, the aerranu or do- N. *='^'"* / houJofSSU, exhibition. \ p 
mertic. of royalty, ererythuiR X »«•. x ^^ ^j,^ j^^^ ,„e««e 
eontucled with poau. and letten. \ X In the population and amuaements. 






STATE ASTROLOGY. 225 

Having erected the scheme to the ^Ten time of the solar 
ingress, the stadent most well and attentively collect the vari- 
ous testimonies of good and evil ; observing what planets are 
angular, (and consequently more powerful) what aspeeU they 
form, and the symbolical indication to which they are allotted, 
by the foregoing diagram ;— still bearing in mind, that as in the 
doctrine of nativities, the greater cause will still be found to 
overcome the lesser, and the more powerful aspect will neu- 
tralise the weaker; by which means he will read in the heavens 
the well or ill being of that nation or kingdom for whose lati- 
tude he erects his scheme, with all its various contingencies ; 
and will be able to answer positively of peace or war, health 
or sickness, dearth or plenty, either of the national population, 
or the particular subject denoted by that house of heaven from 
which he deduces his judgment. — ^We have a most famous ex* 
ample on record of the accuracy with which the ancient Astro- 
logers observed the heavens ; In the instance of nales, who 
was one of the celebrated wise men of ancient Greece ; Aris- 
totle relates of Thales, " that being upbraided by some foolish 
scoffers on account of his poverty, and with the unprofitableness 
of his studies in wisdom and philosophy, he had recourse to his 
Astrological skill, whereby foreseeing that in the year follow- 
ing, olives would be unusually plentiful ; to show his reproach- 
ers the vanity of their ill-timed scoffing, the winter before that 
year he hired all the shops and depositaries (both at Chios and 
MUeium) that were reserved for the making of oil, and having 
got them into his hands for a very small sum, because no man 
would give more at that season of the year — After he had thus 
forestalled their use, the next year, when the time of gathering 
olives came on, every man being suddenly destitute of rooms 
and offices, answerable to the great plenty of olives, with which 
they were glutted, were driven to resort to Tkales for his sup- 
ply thereof ; who taking advantage of that necessity, did turn 
them over at what price himself listed : whereby he gathered 
together on a sudden, a great mass of money ; and afterwards 
(to show his contempt of riches) gave it to the poor. — Thus 
letting the world understand that it was no hard matter for an 
Astrologer to enrich himself, if wealth were the thing that he 

P 



226 A MANUAL OJP ASTROLOGY. 

esteemed ; and although at the present day, '' the precioas me- 
tals'' are more difficalt to acquire^ yet it mray be still retorted 
upon the adversaries of Astrology, that as in the days of Thales, 
the wise observer of nature^ by the coarses of the itafs, might, 
yrere he so iqolinedi dven in these days, as certainly d&rich him- 
self by his skill in celestial wisdom, as did those of old. The 
foreknowledge of the rise and fall of certain commodities, con*^ 
nQct^d with the commercial pursaits, or the daily fluctaations in 
the monied interest, and the various secrets ^lative to th& 
finaooes of tbd country ; which none but an A$trologet could 
possibly foresee or aocouni for, afford the mbans of almost 
boandless wealth, and without the hasard usually attendant 
upon such cDotiHgent speculations. Probably tome illiberal 
persons, or inveterate critics, may condemn these assertions, as 
destitute of truth ; but Ibd believer in the att, or the true phr* 
losophic observer of nature, will readily perceive that it is no 
vain or empty boast of fallacious skill, but merely the effects of 
a judicious application of certain principles, which antiquity 
has bequeathed us, and experience ratified ; in certain peculiar 
cases, by v^ieh the student in starry science is enabled to foresee 
the good or iU fortune qf every ttfider^oMng.— Thus also the 
sacred writers "Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and 
the man that getteth understandings— she is more precious than 
rubies ; and all the things thou canst delire, are not to be com- 
pared unto her,— -length of days is in her right hand, and in 
her left hand riches and honor !" 

The ingress of iSW in Aries, is the horoscope, radix, or ground 
work of the Astrological year, which commences therewith, 
and continues with the solar circuit throughout the whole of 
the twelve celestial signs.— Hence all predictions in almanacks, 
and annual publications, have, or are presumed to have, the them e 
of heaven erected to the vernal ingress for their primary data ; 
but in addition to this, it is also necessary to pay great attention 
to the Neomenia, or 

THE NEW MOON OP THE YEAR. 
In every annual revolution of the Sun, the first New Moon 



STATE ASTROLOGT. 22? 

of the infant year, is to be considered as of particolar and es- 
sential force in Astrological knowledge. In former times, this 
lonation was witii much pomp and solemnity obsenred as a fes- 
tival, especially in the remoter ages, and by the ancient na- 
tions.-^lt was oelebfated by the Israelites, as well as by the 
Pagans (which is evident from the 20th chapter of the first 
book of Samnel) and kept once in a year with eztraordinaiy 
ceremonies. Althongh these soperstitioos observances are hap- 
pily no more, yet the efficacy of the planetary motions at the 
New Moon, nearest to the vernal equinox, cannot be denied, 
and in all cases the student most well observe the horoscope 
for that lonation ; and by examining the various configurations 
formed by die active or passive stars, and Astral significators. 
Joined io Ae effects demoUd in the vernal tugress, he will be 
enabled to arrive at the most perfect eondosions, rdative to the 
destiny of that nation, for which his calenlations are made. 

M Look how the floor oflmTla 

Too thick inlaid with pittiiies ofbc^t gold ! 

There*s not the onalkst orb whkh thoa behoU*it 

But in bis notion like an anpl oi^ 

Still quinng to the joong-tjtd chanbinH ; 

Sudi harmony is in immortal soiJs. — 
But when the jlaaels, 

In enl mixture, to d i sorde r wander. 

What plagues ? and what portents? what mutinies ? 
. IVhat lining of |he sea? what shaking of the eartii? 

Commotion in the winds ? Frights, changes, honon. 

Divest «nd crack 

The unity and married calm of states, 

Qnite from their fixtaics !" 



228 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



THE INGRESS OF SOL INTO 

(a^amer, Stlira, an]i eapricorn. 

CONSTITUTING THE 

Summer, Autumn, and Winter Quarters. 

In like manner as we have given the precepts for judging the 
vernal equinox^ even so must the student proceed in forming 
his predictions from the remaining quadrants of the year, fram- 
ing his horoscope for the summer quarter, at the precise hour 
and minute vrhen the Sun enters the constellation Cancer; for 
the. autumnal quarter, when Sol enters the beginning of the 
sign Libra, and the hyemal, or winter quarter, when he in like 
manner touches the first star in the constellation Capricorn. 
The time token each of these takes place, the Ephemeris, as 
before said, will accurately show ; and, moreover, these ingresses 
are in the Ephemeris calculated to sdar ^tme, which requires 
no addition or subtraction whatever to be made, contrary to 
nativities where the time is accounted by clocks and watches, 
and consequently not correct, till regulated by the Sun.— Thus 
the method of predicting by the horoscopes of the year in State 
Astrology, is void of any difficulty in the process, and suffici- 
ently plain and easy to any one who will but pursue the sub- 
ject in a scientific way, as we have heretofore described. 

As a stimulus to such proceedings, it may not be deemed 
altogether irrelevant to the subject, by remarking that the most 
remarkable events in the fate of Europe and the surrounding 
nations, ha/ce been actually foretold, (through the simple but 
beautiful theory of Judicial Astrology). — Thus, in the Prophe- 
tic Almanack, the exact day on which the late Queen Caroline 
died was predicted twelve months before it took place, and at 
a time when the subject thereof was in the enjoyment of health, 
and to all appearance long-lived ; as also the war with the Bur- 
mese, and other special pralictions. — And to go no farther back 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 229> 

than the present year, in the Prophetic Messenger for 1827, the 
author of the work predicted the death of the late illustrious 
and lamented Duke of York ; the similar changes in the cabi- 
net ; the aggression in Portugal, &c. — Even as late as the last 
month, (November 1827) there is the following remarkable 
announcement of an event that even now continues to occupy 
almost undivided attention, namely, the battle of Navarino. 
The author's words are these ^' The Turk^ are going to open 
variance with a gigantic powers a dreadful shipwreck or dis- 
aster at sea is shoum by the signs of the month, which are re- 
markably replete with evil* kc" Therefore it necessarily fol- 
lows, if that the science, when closely studied, invests the dili- 
gent enquirer with these " prophetic powers," which we have 
given proofs that it does, it must be worthy of the patronage 
and support not only of the learned, but of the most dignified ; 
since many contingent events, which necessarily cause almost 
fatal errors in the system of foreign dominions, might by this 
means be rectified and partially prevented. 

Doubtless, great care and almost undivided attention to the 
courses of the stars and the " bright messengers of Heaven," 
coupled with a true philosophical and patient genius, entirely 
divested of prejudice, with a rigid observance of truth in every 
instance, are qualifications not easily found at the present day, 
when wealth and power are the idols most men worship ; but 
still it must be allowed, that ''patience and perseverance will 
perform wonders ;" and no one should rest satisfied with a bare 
superficial examination of any art or science, but according to 
that saying of the ancients, Veritas in Pieteo (or *' truth lies 
hid in a well") they should strive by all possible means to arrive 
at the possei^sion of sterling knowledge, which is the noblest 



• Vide 'Prophetic Messenger, page 38. As also the hieroglyphical en- 
graving for that year, which was issued as early as October 1826, and 
contained an actual picture of the grandest events of the ensuing year, 
namely, the firing of cannons, the march of armies, a naval fight, &c. &c. 
As singular an instance of Astrological foresight as could well be 
adduced ! 



230 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

attribute of mankind in every age. And the true observance 
6t nature in her most retired paths, will eminently condace to 
the attainment of this desired object. Thus MiUon : 

« Now HeaVn In all her glory dioiie sod foll'd 
Her motwDf, at the gnat fint mover*! hand 
First wfa^'d ihm oonne; earth in hor rich attire 
CflnmimiPff lordy annlM ; air, water, eartfai 
By Ibwl, iidi, beast, was flown, was swum, was walk'd 
Frequent ; and of thesixtfa day yet reiftain'd ; 
Then wanted yet the maMer-work, the end 
QfM tfetdcmi a cnatim whO| not pMne 
And brate, as other creatnies, but enduei^. 
With sanctity of reason, might elect 
His atatuze, and npright, wiA front sersne, 
Qoven the test, self knowing, sod ftom thence 
Magntudmoui to eor ret pond mM Kunen $ 
And worship God supreme, who made him chief 
OfoUhisworics.*' 

ParadUe Lotl. 

It has been a constant argument brought forward by the 
iUiberal adversaries of Judicial Astrology, that it is fallacious 
to attempt at predicting future events from the known and ne- 
cessary phenomena of nature, of which eclipses are a part. But 
observe the true force of the argument ; the Astrologer does 
not pretend to attribute the effects which follow eclipses, to 
the single circumstance of the luminaries being obscured, in a 
greater or lesser manner, (although the occurrence of a total 
eclipse happens so seldom, that even here the Astrologer who 
reverences the sacred volume, which speaks of the signs of 
Heaven, might be probably somewhat justified by attributing 
certain effects thereto). But it is the position of the whole 
Heavens, taken in his horoscope for the given time of the 
ecliptic darkness, which he observes, and the actual conjigura* 
turns of every planet, as well as those of the luminaries, which 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 231 

are active or passive agents in the eclipse.— The eclipse itself 
serving only as an epoch, or celestial date, whereby certain 
events are to be predicted from the heretofore known qualities 
of the reigning stars, or planetary orbs — 'This places, the matter 
in a new light, and consequently remwea the charges of super- 
stitien and absurdity, which are usually showei'ed down in 
plentiful epithets upon those who dare to be taise, by attempting 
to find a clue towards unravelling the mysterious laws of the 
universe. It is by a similar play upon letters, words, and argu- 
ments, that the shallow and groundless abuses of this most 
noble science is founded.— A fact, which we hope the critics 
who may be fated to oppose our humble endeavours in the cause 
of truth, will not suffer to pass by unnoticed. 

As a proof of the reality of pUnetary agency at the time of 
eclipses^ let the reader only refer to the remarkable events 
which succeeded the great solar eclipse of September 7» 1S20. 
In the latter part of that year, and in the early part of 1821, a 
general ferment was excited by the proceedings of the late 
Queen Caroline. It was in the month of May 1821, that the 
most mighty of earth's imperial conquerors, Napoleon Buona- 
parte, died.-^Next we have the extraordinary ceremony of his 
majesty's coronation, at which the ill-advised queen attempted 
to be present ; the death of the same ill-fated princess within 
a few days after ; the tumult at her funeral. ^The persecutions 
of the Grecian Christians by their Turkish taskmasters ; which 
became general just at the occultation of the great luminary > 
and which brought on a train of massacres and brutal violations, 
as horrible and revolting to human nature as any on record, by 
which the great cities of Turkey in Asia, were filled with fe- 
male victims, and children, the prey of the barbarian ; and cities 
of injured Greece with reprisals of Mahommedan blood !^— 
Neither must it be forgotten, that in our nation the most extra- 
ordinary distress prevailed among the agriculturists, which 
caused the ruin of thousi&nds, as well As the great depreciation 
of land, which in many districts, was left almost entirely on the 
hands of the proprietors ; and rents, id consequence, were re* 
duced throughout the country from 80 to 60 per cent ! These 



232 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGY. 

events were of too much magnitade to be indifferently passed 
over by the reflecting and philosophical Astrologer. 

Bat more recent still, and more fresh in the memories of our 
readers, are the no less remarkable events which have suc- 
ceeded the 9olar eelipse cf Nwember 29, 1826. Within a 
month of that celestial obscuration, arrived the news of the 
war in Portugal ; the embarkation of British troops for the 
scene of action, which was so totally unexpected, that millions 
of money were alternately gained and lost by the sudden de- 
preciation in our government securities.— Next, the nation was 
filled with one universal note of lamentation and poignant 
sorrow, by the death of the illustrious commander-in-chief, of 
the bravest troops in the world ; succeeding this, were the 
almost unprecedented distractions in the cabinet, through which 
the king was left without a responsible adviser, the army with- 
out a commander, and the government without a head. — Then 
succeeded the Whig promotions, and the total change in the 
cabinet thereby — the violent opposition in the parliamentary 
senate— the death of Mr. Canning, at a most critical juncture ; 
the arming of the Russian fleet — the death of the emperor of 
Saxony, and other no less remarkable events, which whatever 
may have been their cause, have produced the grandest actions 
on the great theatre of Europe ; and events which none but an 
Astrologer can possibly account for, but which, he contends, 
were produced entirely by the positions of the heavenly bodies, 
and their prevailing aspects, at the period of the eelipse ; to 
which the solar ingresses, as before described, bore testimony. 

In calculating eclipses, the Astrologer must draw forth his 
horoscope to the precise minute of time when the eclipse is said 
to be in the middle of its greatest obscuration. — This is also 
known by the Ephemeris, where the date thereof is set down ; 
l)ut otherwise it is easily calculated by the requisite tables, or 
by stereographic projection ; but the first of these is the most 
facile and easy in practice, and the horoscope when erected, 
most be judged by the aforesaid elementary principles, which 
we have clearly elucidated in various parts of this work, which 
if he wishes to excel in this pursuit, must be well remembered. 
Each aspect must be equated, and its various designation, either 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 

symbolical or natural, well and judidonsly observed; the qua- 
lity of the fixed and erratic stars : the nature of the aseendingr 
and culminating constellations ; the lord of each eelestial 
house ; its position and true Astrological meaning ; together 
with the time when these events will occur, which is hereafter 
elucidated ; by which means the portents of each celestial 
omen will be faithfully perceived, and its certain allosioD to 
that particular region or country over which it bears rule, most 
accurately known. — We shall here subjoin the horoscope for 
the late lunar ecltpae of November the 3rd, 1827- 




^* There ihaU be signs in the iS'Mn,and the JIf oon, and the Stars — upon the 
Earth, distress of nations, with perplexity, the sea, and the waves roaring ; and 
men's hearts failing them for fear, and for those things which are coming upon the 
Earth." Luke xxi. 26, 26. 



284 A ^lANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

The iHustrated Franiupieee which adoros this work, cop- 
taint as faithfal a picture as could well be formed of the true 
Astrological preflguratioiis of the foregoing^ ominous horoscope ! 
— and as the author had treated of the particular efTects of each 
celestial sign, relative to this eclipse in the Prophetic Messenger 
for 1828 in a copious manner^ he subjoins the predictions t?^* 
batim therefrom; merely premising that the student will at 
once perceive the singular positions of Hersd^el in the midst of 
heaven, in the verge of Capricorn ; a sign which has peculiar 
Astrological signification to certain countries and regions at 
the time we write ; — added to which, the Moon being eclipsed 
in the ominous degree of Taurus, heightens the presage in a 
most extraordinary manner. — Neither is the portentous scheme 
any way lessened by the angular position of Mercury in the 
house of war and battle ; nor by the position of the Moon 
with the Dragon's Tail : but on the contrary increased. — ^The 
testimonials of many strange and extraordinary occurrences 
are too plain and manifest to be passed over without comment, 
— they are allfaiihfuUy depictured in our hieroglyphic ! 

"PROPHETIC OBSERVATIONS- 

RELATIVE TO THE PORTENTOUS CONFIGURATIONS OF THE HEA- 
VENLY BODIES AT THE VISIBLE ECLIPSE OF THE MOON, 

On the 3rd of Not ember , 1827 / the effects of which will he in 
active influence over the greater part of Europe for a consi^ 
derable period ! 

That the stars are signs of future events, and that they have 
power over the inferior world, and over all terrestrial objects, is 
dearly demonstrated ; not only by the inspired writers, but 
also by the most celebrated fathers of the Christian church, in 
all ages.-»Luther, the great reformer, in his commentary on the 
book of Genesis, affirms, that Moses expressly declares, '' that 
the Moon, with the Sun and Stars, were placed in the firma- 
ment of heaven for tokens of that which should befall us, as 
experience teaches, in eclipses, great conjunctions, and the 
like." Melancthon also advises the reader to compare this 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 235 

With the prophet Jeremiah, who speaks of " the signs of hea^ 
verC' in a most emphatic manner. 

The records of antiquity assure us, that Astrology was for* 
meriy the favorite pursuit of the wisest, the mightiest, and the 
most exalted of mankind. Thus Berosus, the Chaldeai), was so 
famous in the art, that, after his death, his statue was erected 
^\ih a golden tongue, to denote his almost divine skill in pre- 
dictions. — 'It is recorded of the Roman emperor Adrian, that by 
his knowledge in the science, '' he was able to set down a 
diary of every accident that would befall him, to the very hour 
of his death V* — ^And the extraordinary skill of Severus, another 
Roman emperor, was such, that having cast his nativity, pre* 
vious to his expedition for the shores of Britain, he caused it to 
be inscribed on the walls of his judicial palace, with the pre- 
diction affixed, (as a monument of his knowledge,) " that he 
should never return again \" which accordingly happened, 
for he died at York, after ruling the empire eighteen years !-t 
And, as Sir Christopher Heydon justly observes, "so highly 
hath this divine knowledge ever been esteemed, by the ancient 
monarchs of the world, that grateful antiquity could not better 
eternize their memory to posterity^ than, as when they lived, 
they valued nothing so precious as the contemplating the hea- 
venly bodies ; so being dead, to make their names live for 
ever amongst the stars. From hence it is that the fairest con- 
stellations of heaven, as Arcturus, Orion, Hercules, Castor, Pol- 
lux, Perseus, Chiron, and the like, still do retain their names : 
whereby their renown now shines more durable, in these ce- 
lestial lamps, than it could by being engraven on the most 
sumptuous pyramid, mausoleum, triumphant arch, or other mo- 
nument, made of frail earthly matter, and subject to the ruins 
of time \" 

Amongst the celestial phenomena of the starry orbs, those of 
ECLIPSES rank in the first class. In the Prophetic Messenger 
of the former year« I have deduced an evidence of Christianity 
therefrom, and proved thereby, that Astrology and Theology 
are twin sciences ; each capable of making mankind happier 
and better. The ancient records, were they consulted, would 
also lead to convincing instances of these facts, had we time to 



236 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

descant thereon. And it has been remarked by every wise ob* 
server of nature, that important changes follow such configu- 
rations ; which extend not only over kingdoms, states, and in- 
dividuals, but also over the brute creation. A singular instance 
whereof is recorded by Peiteer, in his " Tractate of Astrological 
Predictions," where he. gives an authentic example of three 
dogs, " who were all whelped in the eclipse of the Moon," 
*' and which, after they were grown up, fulfilled the significa- 
tions of the eclipse by their miserable death — one of them being 
torn asunder by hounds, another falling off from a high place, 
first broke his thigh, and the next time his neck ; the third was 
burnt !" 

The eclipse, of which I now intend to decipher the omens, 
is that of the lesser luminary, thQ Moon, which takes place 
November drd, 1827, 5h. 7m. P. M. or afternoon, a correct view, 
of the theme of heaven, for which is given in the foregoing 
page. 

*' FuU orb'd, 
The Moon, rising in clouded majesty, 
Is now all over blood. 

A setting crimson stains her beauteous face ; 
A vast eclipse darkens the laboring planet'* 

.MULTON. 

In the horoscope of the hour, the 23rd degree of the celes- 
tial Bull is oriental ; and the mischievous fixed star. Caput Algol, 
or Medusa's Gorgon-Head, is unluckily located near the cusp 
of the House of Life. The Moon is just arising in Taurus, op- 
posed to Venus, from signs of a fixed nature, and singular 
power. The Sun and Venus being configurated in the coustel- 
lation of the Scorpion. — Supreme in the middle heaven, the 
Georgian planet Herschel, is gloomily beheld by a malicious 
aspect of Saturn, the lord of the ninth, tenth, and eleventh 
houses, who, by retrograde motion, approaches a radical trine of 
Venus, the reigning star, and ruler of the ascendant. Jupiter 
and Mars are each found in the sixth mansion, in the Autumnal 
Equinox ; the latter in amicable reception with his dispositor, 
from swift and moveable constellations, containing particular 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 237 

groups of eminent fixed stars ; Mercury, '' the swift messenger 
of heaven/' being angular, and beholding Mars by amicable 
rays, while no less than five planets are under the earth ! 

'•^ Behold 1 the daj of the Lord cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce anger, 
to lay the land deiolate ; and he shaU destroy the sinners thereof out of it. 

** For the stars of heaven, and the constellation thereof, shall not giye their 
light : the Sun shall be darkened in his going forth, and the Moon shall not cause 
ha li^t to shine.'* — Isaiah, xiii. 9, 10. 

The Astral omens of this celestial horoscope are very porten- 
tous i^nd lasting in effect; they afford matter of serious contem>- 
plation to every " nation of the earth," especially as it takes 
place in a fixed and determined sign, and under baleful con- 
stellations. On the continent, and more particularly in those 
countries where the eclipse governs, the hostile rays of the 
warring orbs will be severely felt. Those are the Russian and 
Turkish empires ; great part of Persia, Germany, Holland, 
Rome, Italy, and the Netherlands ; the South American States, 
the American Republic, and also India or China. In some of 
these countries there will be fearful mortality, civil commotions, 
insurrections, decay of trade, and oppression of the common 
people, by tyrannical rulers; numerous outrages, or fearful 
murders, assassinations, and many unheard of crimes. The 
Austrian monarchy has a share of the evil, in various ways* 
The coffers of the continental governments are emptied and 
drained of wealth. The cities of Tunis, Algiers, Constanti- 
nople, Moscow, Petersburgh, Berlin, Madrid, Vienna, Mexico, 
New York, and Philadelphia, are subservient to the hostile de- 
crees of fate. Death seems busy with his dart, even in the 
imperial palaces ! An Empress, or princely matron, and an un- 
usual number of the fair sex, will stoop to fate.* The grim 
tyrant will make sad havoc among the high, and the warlike, 
and the mighty ; and many a splendid mansion, many a royal 
structure, will be turned into mourning. The configurations 



* These predictions were published in October 1827- 7^ Empreu o/Saxonif 
IS since dead! 



^S A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 

will caus^ malevolent effects in Spain /the country of anarchy ; 
and not even the Bourbon government can expect to escape 
fromharm. Even nearer home, both in our own country and 
in Ireland, will the shock of evil aspects be conspicuously per- 
ceived. The Catholic mitre, the Episcopal chair, the Dissenting' 
pulpit, each are warned of evil. A sudden event causes much 
alarm to a distinguished European state; an appeal will be 
made " to the Wooden walls of England ;" but the omens are 
singularly favourable for any enterprise in which the gallant 
naval heroes of Britain are concerned.* Crafty incendiaries in 
the '* Emerald isle/' are completely foiled in their endeavours 
to instigate the peasant, and urge him to deeds of revenge ; yet 
in that country some treacherous scheme is planned, or par- 
tially executed^ which will bring down vengeance on the head 
of the wicked designer ; priestly artifice meets also with its 
deserts. From the position of Herschel, I fear many failures 
will take place in public buildings, edifices, and national works 
of importance. Certainly the greatest genius in the knowa 
world will die under the effects of this eclipse, and one state 
in particular will, like a ftirnace boiling with wrath, become 
both the terror and warning of despotic nations. The winding 
sheet will also deck the banners of a great military hero ; ano- 
ther, high in rank, but not in prowess, descends theistepsof 
that mansion from which none return ; and not even the ele- 
gance of the bar, the senate, or the classic academical chair, 
can frustrate the powerful mandate of him who was never yet 
known to turn from his purpose. — I foresee extraordinary deceit 
and hypocrisy in religion ; atheism advancing rapidly, and 
crimes increasing fearftilly. I see kings but as dust, and the 
renowned as the chaff in the field. Great part of the conti- 
nent will suffer by storm and tempest, or inundations. The 
fruits of the earth will fail, and even the brute creation will 
suffer unconscious of the cause. In the new world, I perceive 
states as if rising and falling with the passing breeze ; in the 



The haUleof Navarino has been since announced ! 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 239 

old world, sickness, death, crimes, and commotions. Even on 

the shores of Britain, may the blast of preparation for war be 

sounded ; and on the continent, as well as the Turkish empire, 

some great crisis is at hand ! Let Europe beware; for there are 

few nations which will not feel, and that most bitterly, the 

effects of the Moon eclipsed in Taurus, afflicted by the evil rays 

of Caput Algol!" 

P. Messenger 1828. 

THE DURATION OF THE EFFECTS CAUSED BY 

ECLIPSES. 

In eclipses of the Moon, the effects are found uniformly to 
succeed the obscuration of that luminary almost immediately. 
But in those of. the /Sun, it is generally found that three months 
or more elapse, before the grandest effects are visible ; and as 
to the duration thereof, the student must well observe in what 
sign or constellation of heaven, the eclipse happens ; for the 
effects of an eclipse of either luminary in Q IT^ or nr^ will 
last for several years ; if in s t £i: or yp , the effects are over 
in a far more brief space of time ; but if in n ^ t ^^ K > 
they are found to commence much sooner, and to continue a 
long while in force, yet liable to occasional interruptions ; and 
in these latter signs, they are found also to afflict mankind far 
more powerfully, than when the eclipse falls in tropical or equi- 
noctial signs. — It must also be again remembered, that the 
greater or lesser effects of each eclipse, will be always in pro- 
portion to the number of digits eclipsed ; or in other words, 
the more toted is the eclipse, the more powerfully will it operate 
upon the earth and its {inhabitants, — Also, that eclipses which 
are invisible, are found to have no peculiar or perceptible influ- 
ence over that region, city, or country, to which they are invi- 
sible» — ^The united observations of Astrologiers, " in every age 
and every clime,'' confirms this opinion ; and the student him« 
self can soon prove it. 



240 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



OF COMETS, 



*' I consider d cornet^ or in the language of the vulgar, a blazing 8tar« as a sky* 
rocket, discharged b]^ an hand that is Almighty." 

Addisok's Guardian, 



' V Lo I from the dread immensity of space, 
Keturniog with accderated course, 
The rushing comet to the Sun descends ; 
And as he sinks below the shading earth, 
With awful train projected o*er the heavens, 
The guilty nations tremble." 

Thomson. 



On the appearance of a remarkable comet, a short time before* 
the death of the celebrated emperor Charlemagne, that nio^ 
narch became extremely anxious upon the sight of this terrific 
messenger/and interrogated his Astronon^ers as to what it fore- 
told ? — Eginardus, his secretary, a profound philosopher, with 
whom he then held a conference, answered him from the i^crip* 
tures — " Be not dismayed at the signs of heaven." To ^hich 
the emperor replied, that " he was not dismayed at such signs, 
but feared and reverenced the powerful cause, and Divine f^a- 
mer of them, who being incensed with anger against a people 
or a prince, is wont by these, to admonish them of his wrath, 
and to call them to repentance that they may avoid it. 

Modern philosophers have been at infinite pains to persuade 
us, that every part of the sacred volume, which is replete with 
intimation relative to the importance of the " heavenly signs," 



STATE ASTROLOGY. ?41 

is a mere jumble of words devoid of meaning; nay, tbey will 
not even allow that the most terrific, or blazing comet, has any 
thing to do with portending national calamities, or the fall of 
the mighty and tyrannical, in which light our ancestors inva- 
riably viewed them. — How far they have succeeded, and how 
far they have reaped the fruit of their labours, let the mon- 
strous growth of atheism, sophistry, irreligion, crimes and im- 
moralities, with the shocking contempt of *' all that is sacred 
on earth, or holy in heaven,'' bear lawful witness ! —Our fore- 
fathers were pious, were brave, were religious ; they fought, 
bled, and conquered for the land " of their altars," as well as 
their homes ; but they believed in Astrology, they reverenced the 
" signs of heaven ;" in a word, they were what is now called 
" superstitious," although, except in the dark ages of popery, 
(when the mitre and the crosier at times bore cruel sway,) we 
could challenge the whole of our modern sophists to affix 
aught like ''superstition" or credulity to the memory of our he- 
roic ancestors. 

It is fortunate for the celestial science, and proves the connec- 
tion between its truth, and the truth of the sacred volume, that 
in the minds of the great majority of mankind, there is, and for 
ever will be, an innate evidence in favour of the ancient and 
vulgar opinion ; for that opinion, whatever the pomposity of 
modem scepticism may say on the subject, is certainly the most 
pious. — Daniel (in his 6th chapter) says, that " He (God) 
worketh signs and wonders in heaven, and in the earth ;*' and 
Christ, speaking of the calamities which were to come upon 
Judea, declared> that " nation shall rise against nation, and 
kingdom against kingdom ; and great earthquakes shall be in 
divers places, and famines, ai^d pestilences, and fearful sights ; 
and great signs shall there be from heaven." — ^The history of 
Josephus (the Jewish historian) proves that cM these things 
were fully accomplished. 

Neither did these things escape the attention of the greatest 
and wisest men of ancient times. Cicero* writes, " that in the 
civil war between Octavius Augustus and Mark Antony, it 



* Gicero {ie not, dwr. L 2.) 

Q 



^2 A MANUAL OP ASTROLOGT. 

viBS obsehrefdihiit eitmetif were the harbingers ot the niiaeries 
that then HeM them." HeyfUe of opinioa^ " that stuA, appear'^ 
anees idere prenuncidtionis of grtat events ;" and whibh, he 
says, f' were confirmecl by vi»rioCfs insta&ces from all ahtiqaity." 
Of the same ophiiori was Pliny,* who writes, '' a fearful star 
this comet is, and not easily expiated; as it appeared by the late 
d vil troubles when OctaTins was eonsill ; as also a second time 
by the fntestine war of Pompey and Caesar ; ilnd in onr days, 
about the time that Clauditis Oesar was poisoned, and left the 
empire to Domitius NerO', iri the time of whose feign and gO" 
verhment there was a blading con^et, in a manner continually 
seen." — Another writer, no less celebrated among the ancient 
worthies, Seneca, exclaims, ''Some comets are very cruel, and 
threaten us with the Woi^st of mischiefs ; they bring with them, 
and leave behind them, the Seeds of blood and slaughter/'--^ 
Socrates, the historito, rec6rds this passsiget upon Gainas' be* 
sieging of Constantinople, '' So great was the danger which hung 
oyer the city, that t^ was presignified and portended by a huge 
blasting comet that rcfached from heaven to the earth, the like 
to which no man ever saW before-." — Cedrenfas,X another histo- 
rian, states, that a com^t appeared before the death of Johanlies 
Tziraicas, the emperor of the East. He says, " It fbreshewed 
the death of the emperor, and those immediate calamities which 
were to befal the Roman dominions, by reason of their civil 
wars." In another part of his writings he likewise states, that 
*' a wonderful comet was seen in (he reign of Constantine, 
which portended calamities that wer6 to befkl the world soon 
after." Anna Commena, the daughter of Aleieius, the Greek 
eteperor, (whose life she wrote) speaking of a most remark- 
able comet that appeared before the irruption of the Gau1s,§f 
remarks, '' This happened by the usual administration of Pro- 
vidence in such ca8es,/or t^ is not fit that so great and strange 
an alteration of things as was brought to pasS by that coming 
of theirs, should be without some previous denunciation and 
admonishment from heaven.' She further remarks, that all 



• Pliny (/. 2. e. 25.) f Socrates, & 6. c. 6. 

X Cedrcnus, «< fide his CompcDdiani of Hkary.** ' § Aleviad L 12. 



STATE ASTROLOGY. 24^ 

the enquiry of spectators, was, " What eviU doth this new 
light in the heavens come to warn us of? What strange tiding 
doth this messenger from above arrive with ?" 

Machiavel,* spefaking concerning comets, remarks ''however 
It cometd to pass, so it is, that we have it vouched by experi' 
ence, ihat some great commotions are the consequences of stick 
sighs as these." MilichittSff professor of mathematics in Mai- 
denbarg, observes, " there is good grounds for the usoal beha- 
viour of men as to comets ; for they have reason to gaze at them 
with so much terror and astonishment as they do, because it 
hath been proved, by a large induction of experience and obser^ 
vation, that they denounce great slaughter to the world, sack- 
ing of cities, subversion of kingdoms, and other public disasters/' 
The learned GrotiusX observes, that *' Comets and fiery 
swords, and such like signs, are wont to be the forerunners of 
great changes in the world," Thus also Josephus,§ who after 
commenting at large on the wonderful blindness and wilful ob- 
stinacy of his countrymen, (by which their ruin was preceded) 
remarks, that '' when they were at any time premonisbed from 
the lips of truth itself, by prodigies, and other premonitory 
signs of their approaching ruin, they had neither eyes, ears, or 
understanding, to make a right use of them, but passed them 
over without heeding, or so much as thinking of them : as for 
example, what shall we say of the Comet, in the form of a 
sword, that hung over Jerusalem for a whole year together ? 
: In addition to the foregoing, it may be mentioned that the 
most eminent mathematicians and philosophers of former times, 
held similar opinions of tlie prodigies portended by Comets. — 
Among whom may be named, as most conspicuous, Ptolemy, 
Tycho Brah^, Longomontanus, Clavius, Piso, &c. &c. ; and to 
deny their effects, even according to natural philosophy, is 
equally as a^ard as to deny the known effects of the Son and 
Moon, or of any other celestial body. Their appearance may. 



* ^lacfaiavel, D'up' Lie. 56. 

i* Vide his Cw iun e ntM y on the teeond book of Plmjr . 

X Grotiof, M Prop. Jod^ c iL r. SO. 

§ JoKpfaus " Wan oftU Jcvty* b. rii. c 12. 



:844 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGr. 

,on natural principles alone« be accounted as forerunning (and 
consequently presaging') evil, since their presence must certainly 
derange the system for a time ; and as a clever Astrologer ob- 
serves, ** The ancients, who though not so learned as the mo- 
dems, were more acute in their observations, considered them 
as the cause of every calamity that could afflict mankind ; and 
modern observations confirm this opinion." The great Comet 
in 16S0, follawed by another lesser one in 1682, was evidently 
the forerunner of all those remarkable and disastrous events 
that ended in the revolution in 1688. It also evidently presaged 
the revocation of the edict of Nantz; and the cruel persecution 
of the Protestants^ by the French king Louis XIY., and which 
was afterwards followed by those terrible wars, which with 
little intermission, continued to ravage the finest parts ofEu^ 
rope for nearly twenty-four years. 

Leybourn in his Mathematical Chariot,* gives a description 
of four Comets which appeared in 1618, the year before the 
commencement of the thirty years wax in Germany, which evi- 
dently prognosticated the devastation, blood, and slaughter, 
that ensued ; as one of them appears to have been particularly 
jemarkable. Ricciolus, Hevelius, and Dr. Cotton Mather, have 
given a catalogue of all the remarkable Comets that had ap- 
peared before their time, with a list of the real occurrences 
which took place soon afterwards. Indeed it is almost super- 
fluous to mention further examples of the kind, did we not bear 
in mind those recent instances, in which the appearances of 
these warning messengers have had ample verification, as to the 
events they foretold. Thus the Comet in 1807> which appeared 
towards the south in September, presaged the troubles in Spain, 
the dethroning of its king, and the subsequent usurpation of his 
son Ferdinand, with those remarkable events that almost imme- 
diately succeeded its appearance 

But the great Comet of 1811, which appeared near the con- 
stellation Ursa Mc^or, and whose orbit crossed the ecliptic, in 
the sixteenth degree of Leo and Aquaries,Yi2A the most remark- 



* Lejrbourne, Curnts Moihtm, p. 453. 



STAT£ ASTKOLOGT. Mft 

able that has appeared in modem times, when aboat the time 
of its greatest northern declination, and when its appearance 
was in consequence most conspicuous, it daily passed over the 
midst of Europe. Neither were the nightly changes, of which 
it was the forerunner, less conspicuous in their quick and n^id 
sncoesnon. — A few months afterwards, the late French empe- 
ror, guided by his evil star, commenced his unfortunate march 
against Russia. — The burning of Moscow, the destruction of 
armies, and the stupendous events which almost immedieUelff 
f Mowed the appearance (of that celestial omen J are sul^eets of 
history, never to he forgotten ! — ^And he would deny the possi- 
bility of Comets, being sent as special tokens, to forewarn man- 
kind, naturally considering after such facts as the above, offers 
a most pointed insult to the divine wisdom of the " Most High," 
the Almighty Ruler of the Universe. 

Astrologers, in general, have supposed comets to be of a 
fiery nature ; which seems likely to he the case, since their ap- 
pearance is usually succeeded by an unseasonable warmth in 
our atmosphere. Providence seems also to have wisely ordered* 
that they should move in angles, that do not interfere with the 
planetary orbs that revolve in the zodiac. — ^To which it may be 
further adduced in evidence of their being sent for " signs," 
that the greatest of them, and the most remarkable, have 
uniformly appeared in the northern hemisphere ; thus passing 
over those nations which have been the most convulsed by great 
political events. 

^ The kmw orriMd— and it becune 
A wandcnng man of diapelcw flame, 
A pathless comet ; and a cone, 
Tbfd menace of the uniTcrse.*' 

Brmoir. 



846 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY. 



ASTROLOGICAL PORTENTS 

FROM THE APPEARANCE OF 

METEORS, AND UNUSUAL CELESTIAL PHENOMENA, 

In Qeneral, 

The ancient Astrologers, in these particnlars> were accus- 
tomed to pay peculiar attention to that part or quarter of hea^ 
yen i|i which these celestial. appearances were first seen ; added 
to.whi.ch> they observed in what co^stellatioi^ of heaven, an^ 
near what fixed stars of epiinence, th&y were posited, in re* 
spect to their longitude, . They ^Iso deduced' a system of pre- 
sages from their color, shape, resemblance to swords, crowns, 
halo's, wands, flames of fire, &c. v But the most philo^sophical 
^nd also natural way, is avideptly to ca^t a theme of heavep^ 
to that hour in which they are, first seep : and from which the 
certain cause of their appearance is more likely to bjecp/na ma- 
nifest to the student, than in anj^ other manner. The figure of 
•the heavens at the appearance of the Georgium Sidus, or the 
pew planet discovered by Herschel, an^ since called by his 
name, evinces tl^e singular ^ruth of this corollary. — ^This planet 
was first discovered on March L3th 1781, lOh. P. M. ; and by 
casting the horoscope for that period, the student will perceive 
that the celpstial str^j^ger was in fhe ninfk house of heaven, 
and ScUum in the tipentieth degree of Sagittarius, in the se^ 
cond house or house of wealth, — ^The horpscppe of his appear- 
ance of course most plainly indicated, that t^e influence to be 
expected frpm this newly discovered star would be eminently 
evil — and such. Astrologers have ever found it to prove. — 
Therefore it readily follows, that the same rules must be ob- 
served in every case, where a new celestial appearance or un- 
usual phenomena is observed in the heavens. 

Astra regunt homines, sed regit astra Deus* 



THE MYSTIC glGJIATURES. 247 



OF THE SEVEN PLANETS; 

AN EXTRACT FROM AN HIGH^r PJIRIOVB AND ANCIENT 

ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT. 



Communicated by PhUculelphus, 

** The heaven, stars, and planets, cause no evil, neither were 
we corrupted and tempted by them, but by parents, from whom 
by a natural induction of blood and jpheritance, we all derive 
a corrupt will, which causeth in us many unlawful desires and 
their consequences ; the fountain and cause whereof is, a cor- 
rupt will, for every planet in its own property is good, and 
communicates nothing to us but what is good, but our will 
being corrupt, makes a bad use of that which is good in itself ; 
as for example x—fire is good, and so necessary, that we cannot 
live without it ; but he who is corrupt in his will, may set his 
neighbour's house on fire with it, and so it is of the planets, as 
it is manifested in their order.'' 

i2 in biA propejrty is contemplative, and conduceth to all 
secret wisdom and deep science, in w^ich respect he is ^pper- 
most, like the head over the body, for contemplation always 
goes before action ; wherelp^ Satup having the contemplativp 
property, is placed above the oth^r planets whose properties 
ere only active. The property of Saturn stirs up the contepi- 
plative faculty of n^an, apd kindles in him a desire ^ fcuQw th^ 
mysteries of God and nature, and this is done accordingly, if 
the soul be good ; but if the unlawful iqppetite of the fiery es- 
sence prevail, then it seeks pot the mysteries from God and na- 
ture, for it knoweth that a good life is ri^quired, and that wis- 



248 A MANUAL OF ASTROLOGY: 

dom Cometh from God, so that it despaireth to obtain the mys- 
teries from God ; and being unwilling to forsake sinful appe- 
tites^ it endeavours to obtain the knowledge of the mysteries by 
unlawful means^ ^nd so makes a bad use of the magical desire 
which was kindled in him by the saturnial property ; fo^ he 
runs to the devil, studies witchcraft, and all forbidden arts^ to 
gain thereby a familiarity with wicked spirits, and knowing 
that the devil will not call, upon him for amendment of life, 
but^will, as he hopeth, put him in possession of these myste- 
ries, and suffer .him to continue in his wicked and vain hopes, 
flying from God because he is good, seeking after the devil, 
who in the end will deceive him in his hopes, and destroy his 
soul. 

SJttjJttet* 

Jl among the planets hath a goodly splendor, and lively 
sprightly light ; a certain joy, for the contemplative melancholy 
of Saturn, breaks out in Jupiter into action, which causeth in 
him flashing rejoicing lights, with a quick brightness and shin- 
ing. This cannot be better expressed, than by a wise contem- 
plative person, who being desirous of wisdom and secret know- 
ledge, seeks it with a kind of melancholy contemplative look, 
if we consider only his outward appearance, for so far he is 
truly saturnine^ so as we judge hiiu sad, when indeed he is only 
serious ; and although his countenance be heavy, yet his heart 
is pleasant inwardly, and this is the right saturnine property. But 
when the wise man, after much melancholy and contemplation, 
hath found out the secret he sought for, then he falls with great 
joy from contemplation to action, and then the pleasure that 
was only inwardly, appears outwardly on his face; for the 
color T2 (tin) is bright and lively, though his o^tward appear- 
ance be dark and cloudy, so that Jupiter is nothing but the 
centre of I2 (lead) manifested ; for in Jupiter, which is the 
next planet under Saturn, the contemplative influence begins 
to be active, which causeth such a bright light, and such a 
lively stirring brightness in Jupiter, for he is the first, active 
planet wherein the joy of the contemplative faculty is manif* 



THE MYSTIC SIGNATURES. 249 

fested, which it sets forward for action^ and descends from Sa- 
turn to Jupiter, "y. then, as we have said> is the first active 
planet, for in him, that which first begins to break out into 
action was formerly conceived in Saturn, even as the thoughts 
which are silently concealed in the heart, are actually and au- 
dibly manifested in the mouth, where the very thought begins 
to break out into action, in the voice, in articulate formed sounds 
and words : not without reason, therefore, did the wise men 
attribute to Saturn all scholars and philosophers, as also all 
priests and hermits, all melancholy and reserved persons, who 
love a solitary and retired life, apd who are always full of 
thoughts, and are more disposed to contemplation than to ac- 
tion. On the contrary, to Jupiter all statesmen, magistrates^ 
and tradesmen, who use their heads more than their hearts, and 
who are always busied in outward mechanical actions, and not 
in the inward profound speculations of the mind ; and truly all 
professed mechanical arts were found out first by the speculation 
of the mind, for they are but the inventions of contemplative 
spirits, so that the statesman receives his politics from the phi- 
losopher, the one finding, and the other executing, so that con- 
templation still precedes action, as Saturn is before Jupiter in 
the heavens, even as thoughts are conceived in the mind prior 
to the action of speech. Again, who can see the leaves and 
flowers that are in the tree ; certainly no man, but when the 
tree hath put them forth, then they are manifest to all men ; 
even so our thoughts, while they are in the heart, appear to 
none but God and our own souls ; but when manifested by 
words or actions, they are known to all, the heart is the forge 
of the saturnine properties wherein the thoughts rise and are 
formed, and such as the thoughts are, such are the actions ; 
therefore if the saturnine properties be good, those of Jupiter 
must be the same, the saturnine being the source of all. There- 
fore, a wicked man being of the saturnine or melancholy nature, 
he is exceedingly wicked and dangerous. 

g signifies^the fleiy principle. This is worthy of our obser- 



9(K) A I^^^UAL OF ASTI^OlliQPY. 

vatioD> %hht among thfi plimets t^ Sim signiSos (he pure prin- 
ciple of light, iin4 Mars tb^ p^riociple of fire, vbence observe 
that Mai!$ i^ .e;c:aUed above the Sun in the great world, which 
shows to m the co^upjt fiompl^jion of nature at present and of 
man : also> tbe 4fe jn both being placed aboue the light, the 
principle of wratb being more predominant than the principle 
of love ; thns hath Qod portri^yed, as we maj say, the fall of 
man, in tbe great world out of which he was taken, and in 
which, as in a glass, he may see his present and future state. 

We ace ppw come to the noblest of alf tbe planets^ the ; 
Wj^ wiU begi];^ yfith the metal attributed t^ tbi^t pj^net, wbic}i 
is gpht> ^^ WPst perfect body und/ejr tfee 8nn, for jthere i^ po 
s^perQuiity in it; ftpr ai^y i^eqii^ity of eleP9^nta, for it cpn^i^ts 
of ^ipst piur^ .el^pien^^ equally pjrppQEti.oo/9.d by nature, apd by 
a lon^ cofl.coptjv^n of mai^y ye^Is ; ii iy m(^ perfectly fijced, and 
0igei^ll;ed intp th,e b^t jt^/nperat^jce ^at can be, in which respect 
it i^ imprrupfibhf for QeJitfeer life mr water ^n destroy it, nor 
.^a^ tepgJth pf day^. w&ste or alter it> nor can t^e earth ever rust 
it; b^t a.Da^t jalji tbf^e inferior elements, whicb corrupt all 
other bo4ie,$, gohf remains invinqibh far eper ; a wpndei^ul 
thing indeed, ih^)^ a body bojrn in a corruptible plfiQe in the 
e^rtb, sbonld ,be incorruptible, contrary to Jthe nature of the 
parents. This mad^ ^e wise men conclude> tbi^t l^ere was in 
tbe centre of the elea^^nt^^ » certain incorruptible hi4den sub- 
stance Of sped> out pf which gold wa« made ; and in the search 
or iuqui^tipn after >hv9, tbey labored ipn^^^ but tbey chiefly 

sought .it \n gold, feepausp in gold it ww most perfectly digested. 
It has been a$^ed, why aud wherefore all .the world have una- 
nimously admired gold, and made it the price of all other com- 
lupdities; bowc^mo tbPy to agree in this point, when they 
disagree in all others, pipre or less ? for my par]t> the scriptures 
have given me the amplest satisfaction on this head ; and since 
I have already entered into tliis discourse, I shall, in as few 
words as I can, lay down my judgment concerning it. We read, 
in Genesis, that the use pf metals wer^ |c»Oivc» to mw^ ey^p in 



XH£ MYOTIC SIGIJIATURES. 251 

the days of Adam, long* befpre the flof d^ and thoQgh the acrip- 
tores mention no metfils but brass and iro^, yet may we from 
thence condode, that g^old find silver ^ere not then known, 
bat rather infer tjie contrary, for g;old find silver are easily 
melted oat of their o^e, bqt iron and brass not withoijit ^i^calty 
and labor; wbejrefoxe, ;if they ^new t^^it which was most dif- 
ficult, consequently t^ey (Were no strfi,ngers to ^t 9f easy ac- 
cess. Now in the days of Adam a^id T^ubal .Cain, there were 
but few men v^ the world, so that t^ere ^,as /cnqi^ riches than 
they could possess ; jpo;: A^ed t^ey to Iui,ve jlpoked fo|r metals to 
exchange with, for ^11 was in common without purchf^e. It 
is plain Uien, thi^t fke first use {that opan mfide of gold was not 
to ;tn^c wit^ ; let u^ then enquire, whf^t it was jtbat made gold 
so precious, and §p much fid^red. Certainly Uie lyorld is in 
mosit gross ignoramce, inasmuch as there is mfpi^^ who can tell 
what gold is good for ; (jtid na,ture make it only to look at, and 
to pass froni one tiand to another ? Can it oi;ily be seen and felt, 
and is there no other use for it ? Moses took mo^e than prdinsgry 
notiice.of it, and k^ewits ^a^urp, ,^f^ wha^t it ^as good for ; 
otherwise be J|^ad pp^ bs^n so Qurious, fts so particularly lo men- 
tion and praise it, .as he hf^^ i,n Qene^is^ wherjB speaking of the 
four riven that, came pu,t of l^ien, sfiys ** the name of the first 
is Bison, and is that w^ich e^.c^jp^asses the land of Havilah, 
where there is gold, And the gold of thfit land is good." I asjc 
now those ignorant ppem^es of .4^vipe a^od natural magic, if 
Moses wa9 skilled in .metals or not ; if he was, and being so 
great and pious a man, bow {dare they condemn .tb^t which 
teaches .the knowledge of n^ejtal^ : if they say he was nqt ^killed, 
his own writings will condemn them, for in this text, he not 
only says that gold is jtherp, but that likewisie the gold of that 
land is good ; for my own part, I could yrish he had said wh^t 
it was good for, and wbei;ej^ th^ goodness consisted ; but surely 
as to the $kiU /of Moses, tjji^e scriptures bear him witness, that 
he 1009 skilled in all the leqrning of the Egyptians ; but if we 
will pffove the skill of *Mo^s p^l of his oyirn practice, ^e need 
go no further t|ian t}ie golden calf, which by his skill he cal- 
cined and burnt to powder, |uk1 sprinkling it with wate^, gav^ 
it the Israeliites to 4rin)^» and so made an aurum porfcAife. 



252 A MANUAL or ASTROLOGT. 

Saiely gold is good for health, and was first used for that pnr- 
p08e> which made it so precious, though that use is not known 
in our days, yet we have been so fortunate as to see gold dis- 
solved in certain water, and that water, togcfther with the gold 
in a long decoction, congealed into little red stones like rubies, 
which when re-dissolved, and exalted by several multiplica- 
tions, will show us what gold is good for, and why the first 
fathers of the world did so much esteem it, which eontinues to 
be highly valued to this day, though the principle cause why it 
was so esteemed originally, is not now known to the usurers. 
Gold by Ante-Diluvians was used for physic, and not for traflSc; 
and its use as a medicine made it much desired and sought after, 
inasmuch, as it was not only necessary for the prolongation, 
but also preservation of life ; for many learned and religious 
persons are of opinion, that Adam and the other patrtarchg 
who lived before the flood, did excel in this kind of knowledge, 
and prolonged their lives many hundred years, with the use of 
this medicine, whose virtues all men admire, and place more 
esteem on it than on any other thing ; and though the know- 
ledge of the us.e and virtues of gold was lost in process of time, 
yet the custom of admiring and valuing it has remained, so 
that gold came to be accounted the most precious of all sub- 
stances, and at last was appointed to be the price of all com- 
modities, and to pass in exchange for all necessaries whatso- 
ever. I shall not now forbear to lay down the reasons which 
made Adam seek for a medicine in gold ; though we have no 
books written by Adam out of which we may take these rea- 
sons, yet we have still the book of created nature, which was 
the only book Adam had to use, and therein is as much to be 
seen now as in the days of Adam, and those reasons which 
Adam therein saw, the same do we now see. Before the fall 
of Adam the elements of earth and water were much purer 
than they are now, and the influences that descended fronf 
Heaven were more abundant and more vigorous than they have 
been since; thus the fruits that were in paradise, and on which 
Adan fed, were without doubt of an heavenly complexion, 
there being in them such an abundance of light and brightness 
that they shone like the Sun and Moon, by whose influence 



THE MYSTIC SIGNATURES. 253 

they were produced ; yea, even the ancient poets in their alle- 
gories tell as of the golden age, &c., by which pictures they 
mean nothing* else but the great fertility before the fall, and 
without doubt the waters and dews then were considerably 
more luxurious and bright than they are now, from having much 
more of the heavenly influence and light in them, so that the . 
fruits of paradise being nourished, with those bright, luxurious, 
and shining dews, did glisten and sparkle like the stars of 
heaven ; for at that time man was not at variance with his 
God, wherefore God did most lovingly pour down his blessings 
in a much greater degree than the earth now does or would re- 
ceive. B|it when man transgressed, he became separated from 
his god, and immediately the earth was cursed, and as the rab- 
bins express it, the upper springs of heavenly fountains were 
stopped, so that the stars did not so abundantly shed down the 
spirit of life as they did before, for Adam was cast out of God's 
paradise (the Sun) to dwell (as a banished man) on the cursed 
earth, and to eat the cursed bitter fruits thereof, and we must 
naturally conceive that the remembrance of the paradise and 
the heavenly glittering fruits therein, was most fresh in Adam's 
memory, even as the remembrance of our country will remain 
to a banished man. When therefore, he was constrained to 
make use of the corruptible fruits of the accursed earth, he must 
needs see the difference between them and the fruits of para- 
dise, for the paradisiacal light and glory was not in them ; this 
recollection we may reasonably conclude made Adam and his 
posterity, who were instructed by him, to search diligently; if 
any amongst the fruits, and productions of the earth retained 
their primitive paradisiacal splendor ; but when they had done 
all they could, none such were to be found in all the vegetable 
kingdom ; colors there were, in flowers and fruits, but fading 
and corruptible, there was no durable light nor shining lustre 
in them ; at last they came to search the mineral kingdom, but 
God had removed that from their eyes, it was locked up like a 
treasure in the bowels of the earth, and they must dig for it, 
and with much labor they find it. Then saw they a resemblance 
to the first paradisiacal splendor, and that most durable and 
incorruptible, having in some measure the primitive glory of 



264 A i^Anual of astrology. 

paradise ; fair in gold Wiefire of heavenly compUction abound^ 
eth, avid in silver ih6 light, and (he like appearance is in M the 
inferior ikietals^ tbdng^li tot in the same purity. They iho saw 
it s^rklitog id precibas stones, as diamonds, ri!ibies, &c. which 
made them respect them as certain relics 6f paradise. But as 
gold and silver could be neither eat nor drank, they therefore 
labored mudh to extract the light and tincture out of them, 
that they might feed on them as on heavenly paradisiacal food 
6r essences. This transcendant art they received fi^om God, 
and not by«any human industry, God haviifig' revealed it to them 
as a means to prolong life, and by w&ich they lived many hun- 
dred years, through the wiM and providence of God. There- 
fore in the first and early times, gold was respected by wise 
men for its medicinal qualities (and it is for these ends all true 
alchemystical philosophers labor). I cannot pass by a tradition 
of Pliny, who mentions that the broth of a hen destroys gold, 
if it be boiled in it, and some j)hysiciand have affirmed the same 
on their own experience, whereupon they prescribe that decoc- 
tion as a prime restorative in physic. 

The scripture tells us, that God has placed his tabernacle in 
the Sun, [the original paradise of Adam^ and truly there is 
fhore of the power and majesty of God manifested in the Sun, 
tban in any other created body, it we consider only the parts of 
the great world ; for we see that when the Sun withdraws 
from us in the winter time, the life also withdraws witb it, and 
that mady living creatures, as well as the herbs, suffer for that 
tinie, a kind of death. Not in vain then did the magi affirm, 
that the anima mundi, or soul of the world, was principally 
resident in the Sun ; for if it be true that where there is life, 
there must be heat, which no man can deny, then the life of the 
world must needs be firom whence the heat arises, and ques- 
tionless all the heat of this world is derived from the Sun, and 
communicated to all other parts, especially to the inferior ele- 
ments ; and likewise in the heavens, where we observe the 
Moon suffer her monthly change, agony, and as it were death, 
by the absence of the Sun from her, for darkness totally pos- 
sesses her, and she quite loses her light, and so continues until 
the Sun again, who with his excellent brightness and abund- 



Tftt MTSTIO SlONATUflES. 255 

dance of light illiiminates the Mooii, filling her with new light f 
for, from conjunction with the Sun, she appears red and not 
unlike the color of heated iron, the Sun baviDgf penet^at^d her 
whole substance and infused his tincture into her. 

Th^ Sun then stirs up the sadness of T2 > cind causes aifk active 
pleasant complexion, which otherwise, without the mixture of 
the Sun would be a bla(?k me)ai!icholy, which U a dangerous 
complexion ; but where Sol and Saturn unite, then there Is the^ 
true philosophical genius. Sol therefore awakens the yital 
spirits, and in all his operationsi resembles God, for as God hath 
the keys of life and death in his hand, and by his sole power 
kills and restores; so likewise doth the Sun bear a resemblance ; 
for the Almighty does, as it were, look into this world through 
the Sun, [the local residence of the glorifled humanity of Jesus 
Christ and the original Paradise,] and coihmunicates his good- 
ness by the light that is measured and proportioned to our ca- 

■ 

pacities, who are not able to look on his inexhaustible light, 
for " no man can see him and live/' 

$ In the heavens is the next beneath the Sun, she is the day 
star and rises with him, and likewise she is the evening star 
and setteth with the Sun. Life is manifested in Sol and is shed 
into all parts of the world, as the life is diffused into all parts of 
the body. But the joy and pleasure which ariseth from the life 
is manifested in $ , which makes her light more cheerly and 
quick than any other stars or planets, for there is in her light 
such a freshness, and liveliness, as is beyond expression ; hence 
the Astrologers have acknowledged her the lady of love, and 
have made her supreme over all our pleasures. 

$ In the heavens representeth the subtile vital spirit, and is 
therefore seldom separated from the Sun any great distance, 
keeping always in his beams, even as the vital spirit aceom-' 
panieth the soul. 



256 A MANUAL OF ASTROLO«T. 

^ In the heavens aignifies the senaiml soul, for though the 
Moon puts on the image of the Sun and is full of light, and 
hath a true heavenly complexion, yet by and by she loses all 
her light, becomes dark^ and puts on the image of the Earth ; 
even so doth the animal soul, for one while she adheres to the 
image of God and is full of heavenly thoughts and desires, and 
in an instant she adheres to the flesh and is full of sinful affec- 
tions ; and thus she falls and rises, rises and falls again, in a 
perpetual course of revolution, so that the most righteous here 
on earth are subject to these failings, for they wax and wane, 
in evil and good dispositions ; though they are the children 
of the light, yet have they their spots and eclipses, which makes 
the Scriptures describe the church triumphant, a« a woman thtU 
hath the Moon under her feet, for, in that glorious church iu 
heaven, we shall be no more subject to such inconstancy ; but 
shall trample the Moon under our feet, and be like the Sun, pe- 
netrated through and through with light, splendor, glory, and 
majesty ; and consequently free from every degree of darkness. 



FINIS. 



J, itGinotm amdSon, Oreat Windmiii Strttt. 



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